;

Critical Race and Ethnic Studies B.A.

Information and Policies

Introduction

Critical race and ethnic studies (CRES) majors develop a deep understanding of how race and other modalities of power have structured human life and have informed the imagination of social transformation and justice in the past and the present. They study the historical production of race and ethnicity both in the United States and across the globe, and learn how the contours of race and racism have changed over time. Students analyze systems of racial and colonial violence—for example, racial capitalism, white supremacy, settler colonialism and imperialist war. They examine historical racial/ethnic ideologies such multiculturalism, colorblindness, and postracialism as well as contemporary social phenomena such as changing working conditions, new migration patterns and emergent cultural expressions. Students also explore the ways that race and ethnicity have developed in concert with gender, sexuality, class, indigeneity, citizenship, and other modalities of power and lived identity.

CRES majors draw on methods and concepts from different academic disciplines in order to better understand historical and contemporary social phenomena and problems. By immersing themselves in interdisciplinary study, they learn to recognize both the limits and value of knowledge production practices. The major allows students flexibility at the upper-division level to design a course of study that enables a general overview of areas of interest or deep engagement with a key area of focus. Students can craft an elective distribution from multiple areas of specific research and career interests. Or, they may wish to take a number of elective courses in a particular area in order to develop expertise in it. For example, they may wish to focus on a social group (e.g., members of the African Diaspora), on a discipline (e.g., history), on a social phenomenon (e.g., social movements), or on a methodological or theoretical orientation (e.g., theories of race, gender and sexuality).

Through their immersion in a program of study that is multidisciplinary, comparative, and transnational in scope, CRES majors develop a critical, situated perspective on race, racial relations, and racial justice in the United States and beyond. CRES also helps students develop skills in critical thinking, comparative analysis, the application of social theory, research, communication, and writing so that they can act effectively in an ever-changing, complex, and culturally diverse world.

Academic Advising for the Program

Email: cres@ucsc.edu
Phone: (831) 459-2757

CRES advising is held in Humanities 1, room 416.  Drop in hours are posted on the CRES website.  Students can make an appointment by using the Slug Success application found under Resources in their student portal (MyUCSC). 

Transfer students should consult the Transfer Student Information and Policy section for specific requirements.

Getting Started in the Major

Students interested in the CRES major do not need preparation to start in the major, but must be enrolled in or have completed CRES 10 to declare the major. (Please see the section "How to Declare a Major" for details.) All requirements of the major can be completed within two years.

Program Learning Outcomes

Students who complete the CRES major should emerge with the following skills, competencies, and knowledge:

Critical Frameworks

  • Demonstrate deep knowledge of historical, contemporary, and intersectional perspectives on race and ethnicity.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with different disciplinary methods applied to race and ethnicity.
  • Demonstrate a critical perspective on institutional power and knowledge.

Communication

  • Demonstrate ability to account for other people’s arguments, to formulate one’s own arguments, and to locate both arguments in the larger context of the field.
  • Demonstrate ability to formulate an argument in alternative media, such as speech, audiovisual, digital, and other forms of non-written communication.
  • Demonstrate writing effectively in the interdisciplinary field.

Research

  • Demonstrate ability to design and implement a collaborative research project.
  • Demonstrate ability to design and implement an independent research project.

Community Collaboration, Engagement, and Activism

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the issues, ethics, and methods surrounding activist, collaborative, and community-based research projects.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of collaborative knowledge that effectively integrates theoretical and experiential thinking about social justice.

Major Qualification Policy and Declaration Process

Major Qualification

Students must be enrolled in or have completed CRES 10, with a C or better, in order to declare the major. Transfer students should consult the Transfer and Information Policy section below.

Appeal Process

A student may file an appeal with the CRES adviser within 15 days of the denial of major declaration. The CRES program will notify the student and the college of the decision within 15 days of the receipt of the appeal.

How to Declare a Major

Students may declare the major by submitting a proposed Petition for Major/Minor Declaration to the program adviser. The major declaration should include a plan to complete CRES 100 and CRES 101 at the next possible opportunity.

Per campus policy, students must submit their major declaration no later than the third quarter of their sophomore year or, in the case of transfer students, no later than the second quarter of their junior year. CRES welcomes students to declare after this time frame who are pursuing more than one major or who are transferring from another major.

Transfer Information and Policy

Transfer Admission Screening Policy

Students planning to apply in this major are not required to complete specific major preparation courses for consideration of admission to UC Santa Cruz.

Getting Started at UCSC as a Transfer Student

Students must be enrolled in or have completed CRES 10, with a C or better, in order to declare the major. Transfer students and students in exceptional circumstances may substitute an equivalent course with the program director’s or undergraduate director’s approval. 

Letter Grade Policy

This program does not have a letter grade policy.

Course Substitution Policy

CRES is an interdisciplinary major that includes courses taught by faculty in other departments (see the Electives section below for a list of approved courses). Students who wish to substitute a course not on the electives list should complete the Petition for Course Credit form available on the CRES website and submit the completed form to CRES advising.   

Double Majors and Major/Minor Combinations Policy

The CRES major works very well as a double major with numerous fields of study such as anthropology, community studies, creative writing, feminist studies, film and digital media, education, environmental studies, history, legal studies, literature, politics, sociology, and more.

Honors

CRES awards honors and highest honors in the major. Students are considered for honors and highest honors based on their cumulative GPA, calculated from grades earned in coursework and the senior exit requirement undertaken for completion of the major. For honors, students must earn a minimum GPA of 3.70 in the relevant courses, while for highest honors, the GPA must be 3.90 or higher. Writing a thesis is not a requirement for receiving honors or highest honors.

Requirements and Planners

Course Requirements

To graduate with a major in CRES, a student is required to complete 10 courses with the approval of the program.

Lower-Division Courses

One lower-division foundation course:

CRES 10Critical Race and Ethnic Studies: An Introduction

5

Upper-Division Courses

Two upper-division courses are required for the major:

CRES 100Comparative Theories of Race and Ethnicity

5

CRES 101Research Methods and Writing in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies

5

Electives

Students must complete at least six upper-division electives offered in critical race and ethnic studies (with the CRES designation) or from the lists below. For current offerings, please visit the CRES course page.

  • At least two electives must be from the list of designated courses focusing on phenomena outside of the U.S. or on transnational or hemispheric subjects.
  • At least two academic divisions must be represented in the elective coursework.

Students are encouraged to supplement their upper-division coursework with language study, internships, and individual or group independent studies. Students may petition to have up to 10 credits of such activities substituted for upper-division elective requirements, so long as these activities serve, or do not interfere with, the breadth requirements.

Arts
FILM 165BRace on Screen

5

FILM 165DAsian Americans and Media

5

FILM 165EChicana/o Cinema, Video

5

HAVC 140AAmerica in Art

5

HAVC 140BVictorian America

5

HAVC 140CRace and American Visual Arts

5

HAVC 140DChicano/Chicana Art: 1970-Present

5

HAVC 141BDeath, Desire, and Modernity

5

HAVC 141FThe Camera and the Body

5

HAVC 141KActivist Art Since 1960: Art, Technology, Activism

5

HAVC 142Contemporary Art and Ecology

5

HAVC 190JVisual Cultures of the Vietnam-American War

5

HAVC 191BThe Virgin of Guadalupe: Images and Symbolism in Spain, Mexico, and the U.S

5

HAVC 191CSubalternatives: Representing Others

5

HAVC 191EFeminist Theory and Art Production

5

HAVC 191KDecolonial Visual Culture

5

Humanities
CRES 111The Sounds of Struggle

5

CRES 114Race and Disability in American Drama

5

CRES 118Abolitionist Futures

5

CRES 150Race, Gender and Algorithms

5

CRES 181The Lynch Doctrine: From Rough Justice to Stand Your Ground

5

CRES 185ARace, Gender, and Science

5

FMST 123Feminism and Cultural Production

5

FMST 124Technology, Science, and Race Across the Americas

5

FMST 125Race, Sex, and Technology

5

FMST 126Images, Power, and Politics: Methods in Visual and Textual Analysis

5

FMST 131The Politics of Matter and the Matter of Politics

5

FMST 139African American Women's History

5

FMST 145Racial and Gender Formations in the U.S

5

HIS 104CCelluloid Natives: American Indian History on Film

5

HIS 104DMuseums and the Representation of Native American History, Memory, and Culture

5

HIS 106BAsian and Asian American History, 1941-Present

5

HIS 109ARace, Gender, and Power in the Antebellum South

5

HIS 110DThe Civil War Era

5

HIS 110HGreater Reconstruction: Race, Empire, and Citizenship in the Post-Civil War United States

5

HIS 111Popular Conceptions of Race in U.S. History, 1600-Present

5

HIS 116AUnchained Memory: Slavery and the Politics of the Past

5

HIS 120W.E.B. Du Bois

5

HIS 121AAfrican American History to 1877

5

HIS 121BAfrican American History: 1877 to the Present

5

HIS 122AJazz and United States Cultural History, 1900-1945

5

HIS 122BJazz and United States Cultural History, 1945 to the Present

5

HIS 123Immigrants and Immigration in U.S. History

5

HIS 128Chicana/Chicano History

5

HIS 145Gender, Colonialism, and Third-World Feminisms

5

HIS 151AMedicine and the Body in the Colonial World

5

HIS 158AThe Escapes of David George: Biographical Research on Slavery and Early America

5

HIS 190DAsian and Latino Immigration Since 1875

5

HIS 190YThe Atlantic Slave Trade

5

HIS 194IU.S. Bases and Social Movements in Asia

5

HISC 117
/CRES 117
Making the Refugee Century: Non-Citizens and Modernity

5

LIT 102Translation Theory

5

LIT 121LGreen Ache: Ecopoetics, Race, and Material

5

LIT 125HModern Arabic Novel

5

LIT 133HHaunted by the Forgotten War: Literature and Film of the Korean War

5

LIT 134ACaribbean Literature

5

LIT 135FEmpire and After in the Anglophone Novel

5

LIT 135GPostcolonial Writing

5

LIT 138BRegions in American Literature

5

LIT 145AColonial American Literatures

5

LIT 146DNineteenth-Century American Fiction

5

LIT 147ATwain, Slavery, and the Literary Imagination

5

LIT 149BContemporary American Literature

5

LIT 149EModern Fiction and Poetry

5

LIT 160ETheorizing Race and Comics

5

LIT 160KRace, Labor, and Migration

5

LIT 161AAfrican American Literature

5

LIT 161BAfrican American Women Writers

5

LIT 162AAsian American Literature

5

LIT 163AAmerican Indian Literature

5

LIT 164AJewish Travel Narratives

5

LIT 164DJewish Diaspora, Ethnicity, and Urban Life

5

LIT 164JJewish Writers and the American City

5

LIT 165BLatino Fictions of the Americas

5

LIT 169AWhite Flow(n): Race, Gender, and Material

5

LIT 182ILittérature d'expression française hors de France

5

LIT 183PFremdenangst: Ausländerfeindlichkeit in der deutschen Literatur und Kultur

5

LIT 189FLiteraturas Latinas en los Estados Unidos: en inglés, español y Spanglish

5

LIT 189UModernidad y literatura: El Boom de la novela latinoamericana

5

LIT 189VAndean Indigenismo

5

LIT 190YTopics in Jewish Literature and Culture

5

Social Sciences
ANTH 110Q
/CRES 110Q/FMST 110Q
Queer Sexuality in Black Popular Culture

5

ANTH 130ONative Feminisms, Gender, and Settler Colonialism

5

ANTH 131Gender in Cross-Cultural Context

5

ANTH 140
/CRES 140
The Body in Rain: Environmental and Medical Intersections

5

ANTH 149Anthropology of Activism

5

ANTH 158Feminist Ethnographies

5

ANTH 187Cultural Heritage in Colonial Contexts

5

ANTH 196JImagining America

5

CMMU 101Communities, Social Movements, and the Third Sector

5

CMMU 163Health Care Inequalities

5

ECON 128
/LGST 128
Poverty and Public Policy

5

EDUC 104Ethical Issues and Teaching

5

EDUC 125Multicultural Children's Literature for Elementary Classrooms

5

EDUC 128Immigrants and Education

5

EDUC 141Bilingualism and Schooling

5

EDUC 160Issues in Educational Reform

5

EDUC 164Urban Education

5

EDUC 173Seminar in Critical Pedagogy

5

EDUC 177Teaching Linguistically Diverse Students

5

EDUC 181Race, Class, and Culture in Education

5

LALS 112Immigration and Assimilation

5

LALS 128
/OAKS 128
Latino Media in the U.S

5

LALS 131Latino Literatures: Assimilation and Assimilability

5

LALS 143Race and Ethnicity

5

LALS 144Mexicana/Chicana Histories

5

LGST 111B
/POLI 111B
Civil Liberties

5

LGST 135Native Peoples Law

5

POLI 110
/LGST 110
Law and Social Issues

5

PSYC 153The Psychology of Poverty and Social Class

5

PSYC 155Social-Community Psychology in Practice

5

PSYC 159HCommunity-Based Interventions

5

PSYC 159IPsychology of Immigration

5

SOCY 120Gender, Race/Ethnicity, Sexuality and Cultural Politics

5

SOCY 121Sociology of Health and Medicine

5

SOCY 126Sex and Sexuality as Social Practice and Representation

5

SOCY 128C
/LGST 128C
Social History of Democracy, Anarchism, and Indigenism

5

SOCY 128I
/LGST 128I
Race and Law

5

SOCY 132Sociology of Science and Technology

5

SOCY 133Currents in African American Cultural Politics

5

SOCY 139TCommunity-Engaged Research Practicum

5

SOCY 145Sociology of Masculinities

5

SOCY 148Educational Inequality

5

SOCY 152Body and Society

5

SOCY 156U.S. Latinx Identities: Centers and Margins

5

SOCY 168Social Justice

5

SOCY 169Social Inequality

5

SOCY 170Ethnicity and Race

5

SOCY 170PThe Political Economy of Race

5

SOCY 171Exploring Global Inequality

5

SOCY 172Sociology of Social Movements

5

SOCY 173XWater and Sanitation Justice

5

Transnational Requirement

Students must select at least two electives focusing on phenomena outside of the U.S. or on transnational or hemispheric subjects.

Division of the Arts
HAVC 110Visual Cultures of West Africa

5

HAVC 111Visual Cultures of Central Africa

5

HAVC 115Gender in African Visual Culture

5

HAVC 116African Architecture

5

HAVC 117Contemporary Art of Africa

5

HAVC 118Art of the Contemporary African Diaspora

5

HAVC 119Arts and Politics of African Urban Space

5

HAVC 123AModernity and the Arts of India

5

HAVC 124BHistory of Photography in Southeast Asia

5

HAVC 162AAdvanced Studies in Early Indigenous American Visual Culture: The Ancient Maya

5

HAVC 163The Native in Colonial Spanish America

5

HAVC 170Art of the Body in Oceania

5

HAVC 172Textile Traditions of Oceania

5

HAVC 179Topics in Oceanic Visual Culture

5

HAVC 190OBerlin: History and the Built Environment

5

HAVC 190WArt and Culture Contact in Oceania

5

HAVC 190XArt and Identity in Oceania

5

Division of the Humanities
CRES 116Race and the Pacific: U.S. and Japanese Empires in Comparative Perspective

5

FMST 112
/POLI 112
Women and the Law

5

FMST 115Gender, Sexuality, and Transnational Migration Across the Americas

5

HIS 101COceans in World History

5

HIS 106AVietnam War Memories

5

HIS 110AColonial America, 1500-1750

5

HIS 116Slavery Across the Americas

5

HIS 130History of Modern Cuba

5

HIS 131Women in Colonial Latin America

5

HIS 134AColonial Mexico

5

HIS 134BHistory of Mexico, 1850 to Present

5

HIS 137AAfrica to 1800

5

HIS 137BAfrica from 1800 to the Present

5

HIS 137CAfrican Cinema

5

HIS 140DRecent Chinese History

5

HIS 150CInventing Modern Japan: The State and the People

5

HIS 150EHistory and Memory in the Okinawan Islands

5

HIS 154Post-Colonial North Africa

5

HIS 155History of Modern Israel

5

HIS 156Interrogating Politics in the Post-Colonial Middle East

5

HIS 157The Ottoman Empire

5

HIS 158C
/ANTH 179
Slavery in the Atlantic World: Historical and Archaeological Perspectives

5

HIS 166Northern Ireland: Communities in Conflict

5

HIS 170CFrom the Trenches to the Casbah: France and its Empire in the 20th Century

5

HIS 177ASlaves, Soldiers, and Scientists: History of the Tropics

5

HIS 178EModern Jewish Intellectual History

5

HIS 181BAfrica and Britain in an Imperial World

5

HIS 184BRacism and Antiracism in Europe: From 1870 to the Present

5

HIS 185ILatin American Jewish History in the Modern Period

5

HIS 185JThe Modern Jewish Experience

5

HIS 190ASlavery and Race in Latin America

5

HIS 190BRace and the Nation in Latin America

5

HIS 190NTopics in African History

5

HIS 190XHistory of the Atlantic World, 1492-1824

5

HIS 194TWorlds of Labor in Asia

5

HIS 194UThe Cold War and East Asia

5

HIS 196NEastern European Jewish Social History

5

LIT 131CWorldings

5

LIT 133FPacific Rim Discourse

5

LIT 133GThe Nuclear Pacific

5

LIT 133IGlobal Japan: Literatures of the Japanese Diaspora

5

LIT 135ATopics in African Literature

5

LIT 137AGlobal Cities

5

LIT 138ACulture and Nation

5

LIT 149FContemporary Mexican Narrative

5

LIT 155ACinema and Subjectivity

5

LIT 155ECinema and Social Change in Latin America

5

LIT 160IRace, Militarism, and Empire in Asia and the Pacific

5

LIT 160JExile, Diaspora, Migration

5

LIT 162BLiterature of the Asian Diaspora

5

LIT 164CGlobal Jewish Writing

5

LIT 164GLiterature and the Holocaust

5

LIT 164HJewish Writers and the European City

5

LIT 165AChicano/Mexicano Geographies

5

LIT 165CMesoamerican Indigenous/Indigenista Literature

5

LIT 168AThe Culture of Islamic Law

5

LIT 189ADe la conquista a Sor Juana

5

LIT 189ECuba

5

LIT 189HLa Globalizacion en/del Cine Latin/o Americano

5

LIT 189LPoesía latinoamericana

5

LIT 189MProsa contemporánea hispanoamericana

5

LIT 189NLatinoamericano testimonio

5

LIT 189OEl Cuento Hispanoamericano: Variedades esteticas de la literatura breve en America Latina

5

LIT 189PLas mujeres en la literatura latinoamericana

5

LIT 189QFicción y marginalidad

5

LIT 189SLa cultura popular en la narrativa latinoamericana

5

LIT 189THistoria de la lectura y los lectores: Recepcion y consumo cultural en el mundo Latino Americano

5

LIT 190OStudies in Slavery, Race, and Nation in the Americas

5

Division of the Social Sciences
ANTH 110O
/HIS 181A
Postcolonial Britain and France

5

ANTH 110PIndia and Indian Diaspora through Film

5

ANTH 129Beyond Borders: Other Globalizations and Histories of Interconnection

5

ANTH 130AAnthropology of Africa.

5

ANTH 130CPolitics and Culture in China

5

ANTH 130F
/CRES 130
Blackness In Motion: Anthology of the African Diasporas

5

ANTH 130ICultures of India

5

ANTH 130LEthnographies of Latin America

5

ANTH 130TReligion and Politics in the Muslim World

5

ANTH 159Race and Anthropology

5

ANTH 194XWomen in Politics: A Third World Perspective

5

CMMU 145Global Capitalism: a History of the Present

5

EDUC 170East Asian Schooling and Immigration

5

EDUC 171South and Southeast Asian Schooling and Immigration

5

LALS 100Concepts and Theories in Latin American and Latina/o Studies

5

LALS 115Mexico-United States Migration

5

LALS 127Genero, Nacion Y Modernidad En El Cine

5

LALS 145Grassroots Social Change in Latin America

5

LALS 150Afro-Latinos/as: Social, Cultural, and Political Dimensions

5

LALS 152Consumer Cultures Between the Americas

5

LALS 165Contemporary Peru

5

LALS 170Indigenous Struggles in the Americas

5

LALS 171Brazil in Black and White

5

LALS 172Visualizing Human Rights

5

LALS 175Migration, Gender, and Health

5

LALS 178Gender, Transnationalism, and Globalization

5

LALS 180Borders: Real and Imagined

5

LALS 194HCentral America and the United States

5

POLI 140CLatin American Politics

5

SOCY 128
/LGST 126
Law and Politics in Contemporary Japan and East Asian Societies

5

SOCY 128M
/LGST 128M
International Law and Global Justice

5

The Colleges
CLTE 135Apprenticeship in Community Engaged Research

5

CLTE 136Methodologies of Critical Praxis

5

Disciplinary Communication (DC) Requirement

Students of every major must satisfy that major’s upper-division disciplinary communication (DC) requirement. The DC requirement in CRES is satisfied by completing the Comprehensive Requirement (see below).

Comprehensive Requirement

The comprehensive requirement is fulfilled by completing a senior seminar from the CRES 190 series, or one of the other senior seminars listed below. CRES 190 series courses in the current General Catalog are also listed below; any CRES 190 series course that is listed in a subsequent General Catalog will also satisfy the comprehensive requirement.

Prerequisites for the CRES 190 series include CRES 10 and CRES 100 and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Senior seminars outside of CRES may have additional enrollment restrictions or prerequisites.

CRES 190A
/FMST 194S
Critical Race Feminisms

5

CRES 190BCritical Migration Studies

5

CRES 190PTrans of Color Movements in Media, Art and Performance

5

CRES 190SFrom Slavery to Precarity: Race, Logistics and Globalization

5

CRES 190TThe War on Terror: Imperialism Past and Present

5

FMST 194K
/CRES 190K
Black Diaspora

5

FMST 194L
/CRES 190L
Comparative Settler Colonial Studies

5

FMST 194M
/CRES 190M
Empire and Sexuality

5

FMST 194O
/CRES 190O
The Politics of Gender and Human Rights

5

FMST 194Q
/CRES 190Q
Queer Diasporas

5

FMST 194U
/CRES 190U
Touring War and Empire

5

FMST 194V
/CRES 190V
Marxism and Feminism

5

ANTH 196G
/CRES 190G
Queer Worlds: Sexuality, Intimacy and Power in Contemporary Ethnography

5

Planners

Four-Year Sample Academic Plan For CRES Major (Frosh)

Students must have satisfied the English language and writing requirement (ELWR) and have completed the C1 requirement in order to enroll in CRES 10. Students who place into C2 in their first fall quarter may enroll in CRES 10 in their first fall quarter.

  Fall Winter Spring
1st (frosh)      
     
     
2nd (soph) CRES 10 CRES 100 CRES 101
    CRES elective
     
3rd (junior) CRES elective CRES elective CRES elective
  CRES elective  
     
4th (senior) CRES elective CRES 190  
     
     

Students must also complete all general education requirements except for ER, which is satisfied by CRES 10

Two-Year Sample Academic Plan for CRES Major (Transfer Students)

Transfer students should complete their general education (GE) requirements or IGETC before enrolling at UCSC, but this is not a requirement to complete the major within two years of transferring. The CRES major consists of 10 courses, allowing transfer students to complete about two CRES courses per quarter along with additional units to complete the required 180 units for graduation.

Sample Transfer-Students Academic Planner for CRES Major – Fall Admission

  Fall Winter Spring
1st (junior) CRES 10 CRES 100 CRES 101
  CRES elective CRES elective
     
2nd (senior) CRES elective CRES elective CRES 190
CRES elective CRES elective