Anthropology Ph.D.

Introduction

The anthropology doctoral program at UCSC consists of three tracks: cultural anthropology, anthropological archaeology, and biological anthropology.

Although applicants are accepted only for the doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) program, students may obtain a master of arts (M.A.) degree after fulfilling specific requirements during the first two years.

The theme of emerging worlds—culture and power after progress—unites the research interests of faculty in the cultural anthropology graduate program.

Our concentration on “emerging worlds” and on the construction of anthropological knowledge is especially well suited for drawing together diverse scholars and specialists in challenging and enriching conversations. Rather than reproduce the boundaries among the traditional subfields of anthropology, we explore how recombination of these approaches can elucidate specific anthropological problems.

The Ph.D. program in anthropological archaeology focuses on the pre-colonial and early post-colonial history of Africa, Mesoamerica, the Caribbean, and western North America. It is distinctive in insisting that theories of power, production and exchange, human ecology, gender, ethnicity, and technological practice be explored through rigorous laboratory and field research methods.

The Ph.D. program in biological anthropology has a methodological emphasis in innovative approaches to human and non-human primate ecology and diversity founded on our expertise in genomics and isotope biochemistry, as well as a longstanding expertise in skeletal biology and its application in bioarchaeology and forensic anthropology.

Advancement to Candidacy

Anthropology Ph.D. students are expected to advance to candidacy by the end of their third year in the program in order to maintain satisfactory academic progress.

Course Requirements

Both the department and the university define the major requirements for each stage of study. The first year of the program is geared toward giving students a theoretical foundation so that they may begin to formulate ideas for a research project. All graduate students are expected to be in residence (on campus) during their first year in the program. At the end of the first year, students will submit a portfolio of substantive work to their first-year committee.

Cultural Track Requirements

Students are expected to pass a first-year review and have advanced to Ph.D. candidacy by the end of their third year. In order to advance to candidacy in cultural anthropology, students must complete:

Core Courses

Must be completed in fall/winter of the first year in the program.*

ANTH 200ACultural Graduate Core Course

5

ANTH 200BCultural Graduate Core Course

5

* ANTH 252, Survey of Cultural Anthropology, is recommended if the student comes from a non-anthropological background.

Ethnographic Writing Requirement

This requirement may be completed by passing Ethnographic Practice, (ANTH 208A) or, upon approval from the department, through an independent research project in which the student engages in research based on participant observation or other ethnographic methodology and in which the student adequately translates that research experience into a written text.

Three Additional Cultural Anthropology Graduate Seminars

Grant Writing (ANTH 228), Colloquia (ANTH 292), Independent Study (ANTH 297/ANTH 299), and tutorials do not count toward this requirement. Tutorials that are taught in conjunction with undergraduate courses do not count toward this requirement.

Note: Not all of these courses are offered each year.

ANTH 208CDesign Anthropology

5

ANTH 219Religions, States, Secularities

5

ANTH 220Cartographies of Culture

5

ANTH 224Anthropology of Secularism

5

ANTH 225The Anthropology of Things: Sign, Gift, Commodity, Tool

5

ANTH 229Constructing Regions

5

ANTH 233Politics of Nature

5

ANTH 234Feminist Anthropology

5

ANTH 235Language and Culture

5

ANTH 238Advanced Topics in Cultural Anthropology

5

ANTH 241Social Justice

5

ANTH 247Critical Perspectives on Nutrition

5

ANTH 248Shadowy Dealings: Anthropology of Finance, Money, and Law

5

ANTH 249Ecological Discourses

5

ANTH 253Advanced Cultural Theory

5

ANTH 254Medicine and Culture

5

ANTH 255Regulating Religion/Sex

5

ANTH 258Experimental Cultures

5

ANTH 259Race in Theory and Ethnography

5

ANTH 262Documenting Cultures

5

SOCY 268B
/FMST 268B/BME 268B/ANTH 267B
Science and Justice Research Seminar

5

ANTH 269Global History and the Longue Duree

5

Archaeology Track Requirements

Students are expected to pass a first-year review and have advanced to Ph.D. candidacy by the end of their third year. In order to advance to candidacy in archaeology, students must complete:

Two Core Theory Courses

Must be completed during first year in the program.

ANTH 270AArchaeology Graduate Core Course: History of Archaeological Theory

5

ANTH 270BCurrent Directions in Archaeological Theory

5

Two Research Methods/Laboratory Courses

Student may substitute courses in another department with adviser approval.

NOTE: Lecture and Lab combinations count as a single course

ANTH 202ASkeletal Biology

5

ANTH 280Advanced Ceramic Analysis

5

ANTH 280LAdvanced Ceramic Analysis Laboratory

2

ANTH 285Osteology of Mammals, Birds, and Fish

5

Two Courses on the Archaeology of a Geographical, Temporal, or Topical Area

Student may substitute courses in another department with adviser approval.

ANTH 276AAdvanced Topics in North American Archaeology

5

ANTH 276BMesoamerican Archaeology

5

ANTH 287Advanced Topics in Archaeology

5

ANTH 273Origins of Farming

5

ANTH 274Origins of Complex Societies

5

Two Additional Graduate Seminars

Students may substitute a graduate seminar in cultural or biological anthropology or in another department with adviser approval. Tutorials that are taught in conjunction with undergraduate courses do not count toward this requirement.

ANTH 225The Anthropology of Things: Sign, Gift, Commodity, Tool

5

ANTH 279Feminism and Gender in Archaeology

5

ANTH 282Household Archaeology

5

One Course in Grant Writing or Research Design
ANTH 228Grant Writing

5

ANTH 272Advanced Archaeological Research

5

Quantitative Methods Requirement

Students in the Archaeology PhD track must demonstrate competency in statistical or computational analysis techniques appropriate to their specific dissertation research projects and professional goals. Plans for gaining and demonstrating this competency should be developed as part of the first year review for each student, in consultation with their adviser and first year committee and with the approval of the department. This competency must be demonstrated and approved by the department prior to taking the qualifying exam and advancing to candidacy.

Two Laboratory Apprenticeships
ANTH 298Advanced Laboratory Apprenticeship

5

Biological Anthropology Track Requirements

Students are expected to pass a first-year review and have advanced to Ph.D. candidacy by the end of their third year. In order to advance to candidacy in biological anthropology, students must complete:

Core Course

Must be completed in Fall/Winter of first year in program.

ANTH 295AScientific Method: Biological Anthropology

5

Ecology and Evolutionary Theory Requirement

Students in the biological anthropology Ph.D. track must demonstrate competency in ecology and evolutionary theory appropriate to their specific dissertation research projects and professional goals. Plans for gaining and demonstrating this competency should be developed during the first quarter in the program, in consultation with their adviser. This competency must be demonstrated and approved by the department by the end of the first year.

One Advanced Anthropological Methods and Research Course

Students in the biological anthropology Ph.D. track must demonstrate competency in advanced methods in human skeletal biology, forensics and bioarchaeology, molecular analysis (genetics), or stable isotope analysis . Plans for gaining and demonstrating this competency should be developed during the first quarter in the program, in consultation with their adviser. This competency must be demonstrated and approved by the department by the end of the first year.

One Additional Advanced Methods and Research Course

Must be completed by the end of the second year. Student may substitute courses in another department with adviser approval.

One Graduate Seminar in Archaeology or Cultural Anthropology

Tutorials that are taught in conjunction with undergraduate courses do not count toward this requirement.

Must be completed by the end of the second year.

Quantitative or Computational Requirement

Students in the biological anthropology Ph.D. track must demonstrate competency in statistical or computational analysis techniques appropriate to their specific dissertation research projects and professional goals. Plans for gaining and demonstrating this competency should be developed as part of the first-year review for each student, in consultation with their adviser and first-year committee and with the approval of the department. This competency must be demonstrated and approved by the department prior to taking the qualifying examination and advancing to candidacy.

Nine Quarters of Advanced Reading in Biological Anthropology

Students are expected to enroll in ANTH 294R, Advanced Readings in Biological Anthropology, every quarter prior to advancing to candidacy.

ANTH 294RAdvanced Readings in Biological Anthropology

5

Two Laboratory Apprenticeships

Students are required to enroll in ANTH 298, Advanced Laboratory Apprenticeship, or equivalent in another department.

ANTH 298Advanced Laboratory Apprenticeship

5

Six Quarters of Methods in Biological Anthropology

Students are expected to enroll in ANTH 216, Methods in Biological Anthropology, in every quarter prior to advancing to candidacy starting their second year.

ANTH 216Methods in Biological Anthropology

5

Nine Quarters of Seminar Series

Students are required to attend at least 8 talks per quarter in the Anthropology Colloquia, Arch-BioAnth Lunch Series, EEB Seminar Series, or EPS Seminar Series.

Comprehensive Exam

This must be completed prior to the end of the second year. Students must demonstrate knowledge in Ecological and Evolutionary Theory, expertise in at least two subfields of Biological Anthropology, and sufficient background in either Archaeology or Cultural Anthropology, especially Medical or Environmental Anthropology. The exam format is a written essay and a two-hour oral exam.

Students may satisfy both the oral and written requirement with a manuscript (worthy of submission to a professional journal) based on a research project undertaken in the second year with adviser approval. They have to be first author of this manuscript in order to satisfy the requirement.

Foreign Language Requirements

The foreign language requirement must be fulfilled before taking the qualifying examination. A qualifying examination cannot be scheduled until the requirement has been met.

It is the responsibility of each graduate student to work with their adviser to identify the language competencies necessary for fieldwork and scholarship and to initiate study toward meeting these needs. To meet the language requirement, competency in one language must be formally demonstrated. Each student's adviser will recommend how this requirement should be met, as well as what additional skills should be sought. Generally accepted ways of meeting the language requirement include:

  • Passing a standardized test at a predetermined level
  • Taking and passing a translation examination administered by an appropriate member of the UCSC faculty or an outside assessor approved by the adviser
  • Taking and passing a series of language courses at a specified advanced level at UCSC or elsewhere, again, to be determined in consultation with the adviser

In some cases, the language in which a relevant scholarly literature exists will be the logical language of examination. In other cases, the language in which fieldwork will be conducted will be the most logical language for examination.

In the case of non-native English speakers who plan to undertake research in their own native language, English can meet the foreign language requirement. In the case of English native speakers who plan to do research in their native language, the requirement should be met by another language relevant to the field research or scholarly resources.

Teaching Requirement

Biological Anthropology Track students must complete two quarters as a teaching assistant.

Pre-Qualifying Requirements

Biological Anthropology track students must present a seminar on proposed research.

Qualifying Examination

The qualifying examination consists of two parts: a written file and a three-hour oral examination with the Qualifying Examination (QE) Committee during which the student presents and discusses the file.

For cultural track students, the file includes:

  1. A theoretically focused dissertation research prospectus (approximately 18-25 pages, double-spaced, actual length to be determined by QE committee).
  2. Two field statements on two anthropological topics selected and developed in consultation with the QE committee. Field statements typically review fields of literature that have (a) an area/regional focus and (b) a thematic/theoretical focus (approximately 18-25 pages, double-spaced, each; actual length to be determined by QE committee).

For archaeology track students, the file includes:

  1. A theoretically-focused dissertation research prospectus (approximately 18-25 pages, double-spaced, actual length to be determined by the QE Committee).
  2. Three field statements reviewing literature of 18-25 pages each on (a) a geographic cultural area, (b) a set of research methods, and (c) a theoretical tradition or theme.

For biological anthropology track students, the file includes:

A theoretically-focused dissertation research prospectus (approximately 18-25 pages, double-spaced, actual length to be determined by the QE Committee).

Residency Requirement

In accordance with Senate Regulation 686, the minimum residence requirement for the Ph.D. degree is six terms, three of which must be spent in residence at the University of California, Santa Cruz campus. Residence is established by the satisfactory completion of one course per term.

Dissertation

Dissertation

Ph.D. candidates must prepare and submit a dissertation that is based on original research and meets the requirements of their dissertation reading committee.

Academic Progress

Good Academic Standing and Probation

A duly registered graduate student is considered to be in good standing so long as the student's department determines that he or she is making satisfactory progress toward a terminal degree. The department and the graduate dean review the academic progress of each continuing graduate student annually.

If the Anthropology Department deems a student's work unsatisfactory, he or she may be placed on probation. A student whose academic progress has been found unsatisfactory in two successive annual reviews will be subject to dismissal from the university.

Recommended probation for a student states:

  1. Reason why (failed X class, etc.)
  2. Steps that must be taken to restore satisfactory academic standing
  3. The timeline for completion of the required work

The letter to the student will state that the failure to meet any one of the requirements may result in dismissal. No action for dismissal is taken until and unless the department recommends dismissal.

A student who has completed 12 or more quarters of full-time work in the same graduate program without advancing to candidacy for the Ph.D. is not considered to be making satisfactory progress. In such cases, the student will be recommended for dismissal or placed on probation until advancement is achieved. A student advanced to candidacy for more than nine quarters who has yet to complete his or her Ph.D. is not considered to be making satisfactory academic progress. Consult the Graduate Student Handbook for more information about academic progress, probation, dismissal, and the appeal process.

Applying for Graduation

The Application for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree form must be completed with all necessary signatures obtained and submitted to the Division of Graduate Studies. Application deadlines are posted in the Academic and Administrative Calendar.

Students may request an extension for submission of their dissertation until late June with approval of their adviser. To request an extension, contact the Anthropology Graduate Program coordinator.

If the student does not complete all the requirements for the degree, including submission of the dissertation by the deadline date, a new application form must be filed for the quarter in which the student will complete the requirements.