Courses

ACEN 110A Advanced Academic English 1

Students develop an academic vocabulary and successful reading strategies in English in order to understand high-level academic texts. Students also practice pronunciation and apply the rules of grammar to written and spoken academic language through weekly oral presentations and written assignments. Enrollment by instructor consent only. Enrollment is restricted to international students.

Credits

5

ACEN 110B Advanced Academic English 2

Students continue to develop an academic vocabulary (e.g., collocations, idiomatic expressions), which is a significant contributor to successful academic reading and writing. Students also practice complex sentence structures in written and spoken language through weekly oral presentations and written assignments. Enrollment is by instructor consent only. Enrollment is restricted to international students.

Credits

5

ACEN 110C Advanced Grammar in Context

Students continue to develop an academic vocabulary, and practice reading and writing complex sentences in English with a high level of grammatical and stylistic accuracy. Students also increase their oral fluency and pragmatic skills and their awareness of second-language learning. Enrollment by instructor consent only. Enrollment restricted to international students. (Formerly Advanced Academic English 3.)

Credits

5

ACEN 110D Advanced Academic English 4

Students continue to develop an academic vocabulary, and practice reading and writing complex essays in English with a high level of grammatical and stylistic accuracy. Students also continue to increase their oral fluency, pragmatic skills, and awareness of second-language learning. Enrollment is by instructor consent only. Enrollment is restricted to international students.

Credits

5

AM 3 Precalculus for the Social Sciences

Introduces mathematical functions and their uses for modeling real-life problems in the social sciences. Includes inequalities, linear and quadratic equations, functions (linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, power, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric), inverses, and the composition of functions. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and Mathematics 3. Mathematics 3 can substitute for this course. (Formerly Applied Mathematics and Statistics 3.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Bruno Mendes, Pascale Garaud

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): score of 200 or higher on the mathematics placement examination (MPE), or MATH 2.

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Fall

AM 6 Precalculus for Statistics

Reviews and introduces mathematical methods useful in the elementary study of statistics, including logic, real numbers, inequalities, linear and quadratic equations, functions, graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, and summation notation. (Formerly AMS 6.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Bruno Mendes

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MATH 2 or mathematics placement examination (MPE) score of 200 or higher or higher.

General Education Code

MF

AM 10 Mathematical Methods for Engineers I

Applications-oriented course on complex numbers and linear algebra integrating Matlab as a computational support tool. Introduction to complex algebra. Vectors, bases and transformations, matrix algebra, solutions of linear systems, inverses and determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and geometric transformations. Students cannot receive credit for this course and for courses 10A or Mathematics 21. (Formerly AMS 10.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Hongyun Wang, Bruno Mendes, Jonathan Katznelson, Nicholas Brummell, Qi Gong, Daniele Venturi, Marcella Gomez

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): score of 400 or higher on the mathematics placement examination (MPE) or MATH 3.

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

AM 11A Mathematical Methods for Economists I

Introduction to mathematical tools and reasoning, with applications to economics. Topics are drawn from differential calculus in one variable and include limits, continuity, differentiation, elasticity, Taylor polynomials, and optimization. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and MATH 11A or MATH 19A or AM 15A. (AM 11A formerly AMS 11A.)

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ECON 11A

Requirements

,Students who have already taken MATH 11A or MATH 19A should not take this course. Prerequisite(s): score of 300 or higher on the mathematics placement examination (MPE), AM 3 or AM 6, or MATH 3.

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

AM 11B Mathematical Methods for Economists II

Mathematical tools and reasoning, with applications to economics. Topics are drawn from multivariable differential calculus and single variable integral calculus, and include partial derivatives, linear and quadratic approximation, optimization with and without constraints, Lagrange multipliers, definite and indefinite integrals, and elementary differential equations. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and MATH 11B or MATH 19B or AM 15B. (AM 11B formerly AMS 11B.)

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ECON 11B

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ECON 11A, or AM 11A, or MATH 11A, or MATH 19A.

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

AM 15A Case-Study Calculus I

Case-study-based, first-quarter introduction to single-variable calculus, with computing labs/discussion sections featuring contemporary symbolic, numerical, and graphical computing tools. Case studies drawn from biology, environmental sciences, health sciences, and psychology. Includes functions, mathematical modeling, limits, continuity, tangents, velocity, derivatives, the chain rule, implicit differentiation, higher derivatives, exponential and logarithmic functions and their derivatives, differentiating inverse functions, the mean value theorem, concavity, inflection points, function optimization, and curve-sketching. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 11A or Economics 11A or Mathematics 11A or 19A. (Formerly AMS 15A.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Bruno Mendes, Pascale Garaud

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): AM 3 or MATH 3 or score of 300 or higher on the mathematics placement examination (MPE) or by permission of instructor.

General Education Code

MF

AM 15B Case-Study Calculus II

Case-study based, second-quarter introduction to single-variable calculus, with computing labs/discussion sections featuring symbolic numerical, and graphical computing tools. Case studies are drawn from biology, environmental science, health science, and psychology. Includes indefinite and definite integrals of functions of a single variable; the fundamental theorem of calculus; integration by parts and other techniques for evaluating integrals; infinite series; Taylor series, polynomial approximations. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 11B or Economics 11B or Mathematics 11B or 19B. (Formerly AMS 15B.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Bruno Mendes, Pascale Garaud

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): AM 15A or AM 11A or ECON 11A or MATH 11A or MATH 19A.

General Education Code

MF

AM 20 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II

Applications-oriented class on ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and systems of ODEs using Matlab as a computational support tool. Covers linear ODEs and systems of linear ODEs; nonlinear ODEs using substitution and Laplace transforms; phase-plane analysis; introduction to numerical methods. Students cannot receive credit for this course and for courses 20A or Mathematics 24. (Formerly AMS 20.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Jonathan Katznelson, Qi Gong, Dongwook Lee, Abhishek Halder

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MATH 19B, and AM 10 or MATH 21.

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring

AM 30 Multivariate Calculus for Engineers

Advanced multivariate calculus for engineering majors. Coordinate systems, parametric curves, and surfaces; partial derivatives, gradient, Taylor expansion, stationary points, constrained optimization; integrals in multiple dimensions; integrals over curves and surfaces. Applications to engineering form an integral part of the course.

Credits

5

Instructor

Q. Gong, Y. Katznelson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): AM 10; and MATH 19B or MATH 20B.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

AM 100 Mathematical Methods for Engineers III

Applications-oriented course on complex analysis and partial differential equations using Maple as symbolic math software support. In addition, introduces Fourier analysis, special functions, and asymptotic methods. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Physics 116B or Physics 116C.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): AM 20, or by permission of instructor.

AM 107 Introduction to Fluid Dynamics

Covers fundamental topics in fluid dynamics: Euler and Lagrange descriptions of continuum dynamics; conservation laws for inviscid and viscous flows; potential flows; exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation; boundary layer theory; gravity waves. Students cannot receive credit for this course and AM 217. (AM 107 formerly AMS 107.)

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

PHYS 107

Instructor

The Staff, Nicholas Brummell

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MATH 107 or PHYS 116C or EART 111.

Quarter offered

Fall

AM 114 Introduction to Dynamical Systems

Introduces continuous and discrete dynamical systems. Topics include: fixed points; stability; limit cycles; bifurcations; transition to and characterization of chaos; fractals. Examples are drawn from sciences and engineering. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 214. (Formerly AMS 114.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Pascale Garaud, Qi Gong, Dejan Milutinovic, Daniele Venturi

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): AM 20; or MATH 21 and MATH 24; or PHYS 116B. Enrollment is restricted to sophomores, juniors and seniors.

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Fall

AM 115 Stochastic Modeling in Biology

Application of differential equations, probability, and stochastic processes to problems in cell, organismal, and population biology. Topics include life-history theory, behavioral ecology, and population biology. Students may not receive credit for this course and course 215.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): STAT 131, a university-level course in biology, and operational knowledge of a programming language; or consent of instructor.

AM 129 Foundations of Scientific Computing for Scientists and Engineers

Covers fundamental aspects of scientific computing for research. Students are introduced to algorithmic development, programming (including the use of compilers, libraries, debugging, optimization, code publication), computational infrastructure, and data analysis tools, gaining hands-on experience through practical assignments. Basic programming experience is assumed. (Formerly AMS 129.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Dongwook Lee

Quarter offered

Fall

AM 147 Computational Methods and Applications

Applications of computational methods to solving mathematical problems using Matlab. Topics include solution of nonlinear equations, linear systems, differential equations, sparse matrix solver, and eigenvalue problems. (Formerly AMS 147.)

Credits

5

Instructor

H. Wang, D. Venturi, A. Halder

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): AM 10 or MATH 21. Knowledge of differential equations (AM 20 or MATH 24) is recommended.

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Winter

AM 148 GPU Programming for Scientific Computations

This second course in scientific computing focuses on the use of parallel processing on GPUs with CUDA. Basic topics covered include the idea of parallelism and parallel architectures. The course then presents key parallel algorithms on GPUs such as scan, reduce, histogram and stencil, and compound algorithms. Applications to scientific computing are drawn from problems in linear algebra, curve fitting, FFTs, systems of ODEs and PDEs, and image processing. Finally, the course presents optimization strategies specific to GPUs. Basic knowledge of Unix, and C is assumed. (Formerly AMS 148.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Pascale Garaud

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): AM 147 or MATH 148 or PHYS 115. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Quarter offered

Spring

AM 198 Independent Study or Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

AM 198F Independent Study or Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

AM 200 Research and Teaching in Applied Mathematics

Basic teaching techniques for teaching assistants, including responsibilities and rights; resource materials; computer skills; leading discussions or lab sessions; presentation techniques; maintaining class records; and grading. Examines research and professional training, including use of library; technical writing; giving talks in seminars and conferences; and ethical issues in science and engineering. (Formerly AMS 200.)

Credits

3

Instructor

The Staff, Athanasios Kottas, Pascale Garaud

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

AM 209 Foundations of Scientific Computing

Covers the fundamental aspects of scientific computing for research. Introduces algorithmic development; programming (including the use of compilers, libraries, debugging, optimization, and code publication); computational infrastructure; and data-analysis tools. Students gain hands-on experience through practical assignments. (Formerly AMS 209.) Basic programming experience will be assumed. May be taught in conjunction with AM 129 some quarters.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll by permission of the instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

AM 211 Foundations of Applied Mathematics

Accelerated class reviewing fundamental applied mathematical methods for all sciences. Topics include: multivariate calculus, linear algebra, Fourier series and integral transform methods, complex analysis, and ordinary differential equations. (Formerly AMS 211.)

Credits

5

Instructor

M. Gomez, H. Wang, J. Katznelson, Nicholas Brummell

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

AM 212A Applied Mathematical Methods I

Focuses on analytical methods for partial differential equations (PDEs), including: the method of characteristics for first-order PDEs; canonical forms of linear second-order PDEs; separation of variables; Sturm-Liouville theory; Green's functions. Illustrates each method using applications taken from examples in physics. Course 211 or equivalent is strongly recommended as preparation. (Formerly AMS 211.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Hongyun Wang, Pascale Garaud, Nicholas Brummell, Marcella Gomez

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates are encouraged to take this class with permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter

AM 212B Applied Mathematical Methods II

Covers perturbation methods: asymptotic series, stationary phase and expansion of integrals, matched asymptotic expansions, multiple scales and the WKB method, Padé approximants and improvements of series. (Formerly AMS 212B.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Hongyun Wang, Pascale Garaud, Nicholas Brummell

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): AM 212A.

Quarter offered

Winter

AM 213A Numerical Linear Algebra

Focuses on numerical solutions to classic problems of linear algebra. Topics include: LU, Cholesky, and QR factorizations; iterative methods for linear equations; least square, power methods, and QR algorithms for eigenvalue problems; and conditioning and stability of numerical algorithms. Provides hands-on experience in implementing numerical algorithms for solving engineering and scientific problems. Basic knowledge of mathematical linear algebra is assumed. (Formerly AMS 213A.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Pascale Garaud, Qi Gong, Dongwook Lee

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

AM 213B Numerical Methods for the Solution of Differential Equations

Introduces the numerical solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs). Focuses on the derivation of discrete solution methods for a variety of differential equations, and their stability and convergence. Also provides hands-on experience in implementing such numerical algorithms for the solution of engineering and scientific problems using MATLAB software. The class consists of lectures and hands-on programming sections. Basic mathematical knowledge of ODEs and PDEs is assumed, and a basic working knowledge of programming in MATLAB is expected. (Formerly AMS 213B.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Hongyun Wang, Dongwook Lee

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

AM 214 Applied Dynamical Systems

Introduces continuous and discrete dynamical systems. Topics include: fixed points; stability; limit cycles; bifurcations; transition to and characterization of chaos; and fractals. Examples drawn from sciences and engineering; founding papers of the subject are studied. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 114. (Formerly AMS 214.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Pascale Garaud, Qi Gong, Dejan Milutinovic, Daniele Venturi

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

AM 215 Stochastic Modeling in Biology

Application of differential equations and probability and stochastic processes to problems in cell, organismal, and population biology. Topics include: life-history theory, behavioral ecology, and population biology. Students may not receive credit for this course and course 115. (Formerly AMS 215.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Marcella Gomez

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll by permission of the instructor.

AM 216 Stochastic Differential Equations

Introduction to stochastic differential equations and diffusion processes with applications to biology, biomolecular engineering, and chemical kinetics. Topics include Brownian motion and white noise, gambler's ruin, backward and forward equations, and the theory of boundary conditions. (Formerly AMS 216.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Hongyun Wang

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll by permission of the instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

AM 217 Introduction to Fluid Dynamics

Covers fundamental topics in fluid dynamics at the graduate level: Euler and Lagrange descriptions of continuum dynamics; conservation laws for inviscid and viscous flows; potential flows; exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation; boundary layer theory; gravity waves. Students cannot receive credit for this course and AM 107. (Formerly AMS 217.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Nicholas Brummell

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll by permission of the instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

AM 227 Waves and Instabilities in Fluids

Advanced fluid dynamics course introducing various types of small-amplitude waves and instabilities that commonly arise in geophysical and astrophysical systems. Topics covered include, but are not limited to: pressure waves, gravity waves, Rossby waves, interfacial instabilities, double-diffusive instabilities, and centrifugal instabilities. Advanced mathematical methods are used to study each topic. Undergraduates are encouraged to take this course with permission of the instructor. (Formerly AMS 227.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Pascale Garaud

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): AM 212A and AM 217.

Quarter offered

Winter

AM 229 Convex Optimization

Focuses on recognizing, formulating, analyzing, and solving convex optimization problems encountered across science and engineering. Topics include: convex sets; convex functions; convex optimization problems; duality; subgradient calculus; algorithms for smooth and non-smooth convex optimization; applications to signal and image processing, machine learning, statistics, control, robotics and economics. Students are required to have knowledge of calculus and linear algebra, and exposure to probability. (Formerly AMS 229.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Abhishek Halder

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

AM 230 Numerical Optimization

Introduces numerical optimization tools widely used in engineering, science, and economics. Topics include: line-search and trust-region methods for unconstrained optimization, fundamental theory of constrained optimization, simplex and interior-point methods for linear programming, and computational algorithms for nonlinear programming. (Formerly AMS 230.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Qi Gong

Requirements

Basic knowledge of linear algebra is assumed. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

AM 231 Nonlinear Control Theory

Covers analysis and design of nonlinear control systems using Lyapunov theory and geometric methods. Includes properties of solutions of nonlinear systems, Lyapunov stability analysis, effects of perturbations, controllability, observability, feedback linearization, and nonlinear control design tools for stabilization. (Formerly AMS 231.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Qi Gong, A. Halder

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): basic knowledge of mathematical analysis and ordinary differential equations is assumed. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll by permission of the instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

AM 232 Applied Optimal Control

Introduces optimal control theory and computational optimal control algorithms. Topics include: calculus of variations, minimum principle, dynamic programming, HJB equation, linear-quadratic regulator, direct and indirect computational methods, and engineering application of optimal control. (Formerly AMS 232.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Qi Gong, Abhishek Halder

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): AM 114 or AM 214, or ECE 240 or ECE 241, or MATH 145. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

AM 238 Fundamentals of Uncertainty Quantification in Computational Science and Engineering

Computing the statistical properties of nonlinear random system is of fundamental importance in many areas of science and engineering. Introduces students to state-of-the-art methods for uncertainty propagation and quantification in model-based computations, focusing on the computational and algorithmic features of these methods most useful in dealing with systems specified in terms of stochastic ordinary and partial differential equations. Topics include: polynomial chaos methods (gPC and ME-gPC), probabilistic collocation methods (PCM and ME-PCM), Monte-Carlo methods (MC, quasi-MC, multi-level MC), sparse grids (SG), probability density function methods, and techniques for dimensional reduction. Basic knowledge of probability theory and elementary numerical methods for ODEs and PDEs is recommended. (Formerly AMS 238.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Daniele Venturi

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): STAT 203 or equivalent, and AM 213B or equivalent. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

AM 250 An Introduction to High Performance Computing

Designed for STEM students and others. Through hands-on practice, this course introduces high-performance parallel computing, including the concepts of multiprocessor machines and parallel computation, and the hardware and software tools associated with them. Students become familiar with parallel concepts and the use of MPI and OpenMP together with some insight into the use of heterogeneous architectures (CPU, CUDA, OpenCL), and some case-study problems. (Formerly AMS 250.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Shawfeng Dong, Nicholas Brummell, Dongwook Lee

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll by permission of the instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

AM 260 Computational Fluid Dynamics

Introduces modern computational approaches to solving the differential equations that arise in fluid dynamics, particularly for problems involving discontinuities and shock waves. Examines the fundamentals of the mathematical foundations and computation methods to obtain solutions. Focuses on writing practical numerical codes and analyzing their results for a full understanding of fluid phenomena. (Formerly AMS 260.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Nicholas Brummell, Dongwook Lee

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Basic knowledge of computer programming languages is assumed. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

AM 275 Magnetohydrodynamics

Studies the interaction of fluid motion and magnetic fields in electrically conducting fluids, with applications in many natural and man-made flows ranging from, for example, planetary physics and astrophysics to industrial metallurgic engineering. (Formerly AMS 275.)

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

EART 275

Instructor

Pascale Garaud, Nicholas Brummell

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): AM 107 or AM 217. AM 227 suggested. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

AM 280A Seminar in Mathematical and Computational Biology

Weekly seminar on mathematical and computational biology. Participants present research findings in organized and critical fashion, framed in context of current literature. Students present own research on a regular basis. (Formerly AMS 280A.)

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

AM 280B Seminar in Applied Mathematical Modeling

Weekly seminar series covering topics of current research in applied mathematics and statistics. Permission of instructor required. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. (Formerly AMS 280B.)

Credits

2

Instructor

A. Halder, M. Gomez

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

AM 280C Seminar in Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

Weekly seminar/discussion group on geophysical and astrophysical fluid dynamics covering both analytical and computational approaches. Participants present research progress and findings in semiformal discussions. Students must present their own research on a regular basis. (Formerly AMS 280C.)

Credits

2

Instructor

D. Lee, P. Garaud, N. Brummell, D. Lee

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll by permission of the instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

AM 296 Masters Project

Independent completion of a masters project under faculty supervision. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

AM 297A Independent Study or Research

Independent study or research under faculty supervision. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

AM 297B Independent Study or Research

Independent study or research under faculty supervision. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

AM 297C Independent Study or Research

Independent study or research under faculty supervision. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

AM 297F Independent Study

Independent study or research under faculty supervision. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

AM 299A Thesis Research

Thesis research under faculty supervision. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

AM 299B Thesis Research

Thesis research under faculty supervision. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

AM 299C Thesis Research

Thesis research under faculty supervision. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ANTH 1 Introduction to Biological Anthropology

Study of evolution illustrated by Pleistocene hominid fossils and variation in living human groups. Behavior and evolution of primates examined as they contribute to the understanding of human evolution. Required for all anthropology majors. (Formerly Introduction to Human Evolution.)

Credits

5

General Education Code

SI

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

ANTH 2 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

A number of different peoples are studied and a variety of approaches to the nature of the culture and to the study of specific cultures presented. Required for all anthropology majors.

Credits

5

Instructor

M. Caldwell

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

ANTH 3 Introduction to Archaeology

Overview of ways of learning about the human past beyond the scope of written history. Reviews development of archaeology, fundamental methods and theories, and archaeology's contribution to understanding human origins, the emergence of farming, and the origins of complex societies.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jon Daehnke

General Education Code

SI

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 93 Field Study

Supervised research or organized projects on anthropological topics for lower-division students. Conducted either on or off campus. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ANTH 97 Laboratory Safety Practicum

Covers laboratory health and safety and standard operating procedures within the anthropology laboratories. Prepares students for future laboratory research activities while providing support of laboratory administration, collections management, and laboratory course demonstration needs. Enrollment by application.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 100 History and Theory of Biological Anthropology

Provides an historical overview from the 18th century to the present of race, ape-human relationships, and human nature. Emergence of an evolutionary framework and of fossil, genetic, and primate information becomes the basis for reformulating ideas about human biology within anthropology.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3 and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements.

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 101 Human Evolution

Study of human evolution covering the last five million years. Examines the fossil evidence and emphasizes the reconstruction of behavior from the paleontological and anatomical evidence.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1.

ANTH 102A Human Skeletal Biology

Presents basic human osteology allowing students to identify skeletal material by element. Emphasizes the dynamic nature of bone by integrating anatomy with a discussion of bone physiology within the context of the human life cycle.

Credits

5

Instructor

E. Washburn

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Summer

ANTH 103 Forensic Anthropology

Covers the basic analysis of human skeletal remains for the medicolegal profession. Assessment of age, sex, ancestry, and general physical characteristics, trauma, and disease are discussed. Addresses the legal responsibilities of the anthropologist. Online lectures with in-class discussion sections, quizzes, and exams. Students cannot receive credit for this course and ANTH 103I.

Credits

5

Instructor

E. Washburn

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 102A. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 103B Forensic Anthropology and Bioarchaeology

Credits

ANTH 103I Forensic Anthropology

This online course teaches the basic analysis of human remains for the medico-legal profession. Covers the development of forensic anthropology, creating a biological profile, evaluating skeletal trauma, estimation of interval since death, and how these assessments can be supported. Students cannot receive credit for this course and for ANTH 103.

Credits

4

Instructor

C. Verdugo

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 102A.

ANTH 104 Human Variation and Adaptation

Explores the major environmental factors (temperature, altitude, diet, and disease); how they are perceived by the human body; the physiological, micro- and macroanatomical responses; and how behavior and culture can modify the impact of these stresses. Course 1 is highly recommended as preparation. (Formerly Human Adaptability.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Lars Fehren-Schmitz

General Education Code

ER

ANTH 105 Human Paleopathology

Examines paleopathology beginning with ancient hominid populations and proceeding to modern populations. Uses both the skeletal evidence and historical documentation when available. Considers evolutionary, cultural, and biological factors. Topics include: osteological diagnosis of infectious disease; trauma; nutritional deficiencies; dental disease; and developmental defects.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1; ANTH 102A recommended.

ANTH 106 Primate Behaviorand Ecology

The nature of primate social systems and social bonds is examined in the light of evolutionary and ecological concepts. We explore the evolution of primate social system behavior and culture, as well as the ecologies of primate populations.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 107A Methods and Research in Biological Anthropology: Genetics

Introduces the molecular analyses of anthropological questions and explores the intersection of genetics and anthropology. Covers the basic principles of molecular and population genetics as they relate to the study of humans. Prerequisite(s): courses 1 and 104. Course 102A is recommended. Enrollment by permission of instructor. (Formerly course 107, Methods and Research in Molecular Anthropology.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Lars Fehren-Schmitz

ANTH 107B Methods and Research in Biological Anthropology: Stable Isotopes

This combination of lectures, readings, discussions, and hands-on laboratory experience provides a comprehensive overview of stable isotope research to reconstruct diet and mobility. Discover the wide application of isotopic research in biological anthropology, bioarcheology, primatology and forensics. Prerequisite(s): at least one of ANTH 101, ANTH 104, ANTH 106, ANTH 107, or ANTH 110F and by permission of the instructor. (Formerly Methods and Research in Stable Isotope Ecology.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Viktoria Oelze

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 101 or ANTH 104 or ANTH 106 or ANTH 107 or ANTH 110F.

General Education Code

PE-H

ANTH 108 Neanderthals

Credits

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): course 1.

ANTH 109 Evolution of Sex

Provides a physical anthropology understanding of the evolution of sex. Focuses on genetics and the altercations in allele associations that take place as a result of sexual processes.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1.

ANTH 110A Public Life and Contemporary Issues

How can cultural anthropology help us to understand current events unfolding locally, nationally, and globally? Students learn how to read newspapers differently--that is, through the lens of cultural analysis. The world of everyday politics and society, as it unfolds in debates happening right now, forms the topical substance of the course. (Formerly course 4.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Alejandra Kramer

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 110B From Indiana Jones to Stonehenge: Archaeology as Popular Culture

Addresses the meaning of archaeology as generated in television, movies, literature, newspapers, and even National Geographic. Students engage with several case-studies illustrating how archaeology is portrayed in popular culture.

Credits

5

General Education Code

IM

ANTH 110C California Pasts

This course is structured around four critical moments--missionization, Rancho-Era, Gold Rush, and World War II--through the eyes of the ethnic and racial minorities who experienced them. Special attention is given to oral, archival, and archaeological sources which reveal California's multiethnic pasts.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

LGST 112

Instructor

Tsim Schneider

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 110D Tourism Imaginaries and Encounters

Explores anthropological approaches to the study of tourism, in particular themes of authenticity, othering, visual economies, development, identity politics, alternative tourisms, and material culture with reference to history, power, and location.

Credits

5

General Education Code

PE-H

ANTH 110E Anthropology of Global Environmental Change

Introduces anthropological and historical approaches to environmental change and globalization. Key themes include: capitalism and industrialization, environmental politics, global culture, and relations between humans and other species.

Credits

5

General Education Code

PE-E

ANTH 110F Evolution of Human Diet

Presents the evolution of human diet and subsistence from a biological anthropological perspective. Covers the key hypothesis and methodologies related to diet, from our early fossil ancestors up to agriculture and animal husbandry. (Formerly Biocultural Approaches to Food.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Viktoria Oelze

General Education Code

PE-H

ANTH 110H Acoustic Culture

Explores relationships between culture and the acoustic worlds, including environmental, verbal, and musical, which humans inhabit. How can paying attention to cultures of listening and sound-making help us think about cultural life and experience in new ways? (Formerly course 80H.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Donald Brenneis

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 110I Cultures of Sustainability and Social Justice

Brings together diverse forms of cultural knowledge and complexities of everyday life to illuminate longstanding concerns of sustainability and justice. Investigates multiple theories of sustainable development as well as tools, techniques, and contexts for ecological integrity, economic security, empowerment, responsibility and social well-being characteristic of sustainable communities. Case studies are drawn from around the world highlighting the work of Right Livelihood Award Laureates in tandem with UC faculty.

Credits

5

Instructor

David Shaw

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 110K Culture Through Food

Examines anthropology of food and politics of eating. Cultural and social uses of food in rituals of solidarity or fasting, identities and meanings of food for individuals, and consumption in the global context are key components of study.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nancy Chen

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 110L Decolonizing Methodologies

Delves into the implications of indigenous research, with themes such as self-determination and healing. At the intersection of indigenous peoples and institutional research, the course covers contexts of research conceptualizations, designs, and implications of participants and their communities.

Credits

5

Instructor

Krisha Hernandez

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 110N Anthropology of Food

Focuses on social institutions around the world that shape food and its meanings; how people use food to organize their worlds; and production, sharing, or consumption of food as a political or meaningful act.

Credits

5

General Education Code

PE-H

ANTH 110O Postcolonial Britain and France

Transdisciplinary examination of the politics and culture of postcolonial Britain and France. Topics include: immigration from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean; racism and antiracism; minority difference and citizenship practices; and the emergence of Islam as a major category of identity and difference.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

HIS 181A

Instructor

Mayanthi Fernando

General Education Code

CC

ANTH 110P India and Indian Diaspora through Film

Explores several themes of relevance in contemporary India and Indian diaspora, concentrating on anthropological research and various documentary and popular Bollywood films. Through films and ethnographies, students analyze the nature of anthropological contributions to the study of Indian societies. (Formerly course 80P.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Annapurna Pandey

General Education Code

CC

ANTH 110Q Queer Sexuality in Black Popular Culture

From Janet Mock to Young M.A., queerness has become hypervisible in Black popular culture--but at what cost? Using music, television, and social media as central texts, students investigate the intersections of sexuality, gender, and race in public life.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

CRES 110Q, FMST 110Q

Instructor

S. Shange-Binion

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 110R Discourses in American Religions and Their Role in Public Life

Introduces dominant discourses about major American religions and their role in public life, with particular attention to intersecting differences, such as race, sex/gender, and disability, and to shifting religious/political boundaries. Visual and textual media, political commentary, and popular ethnographies are analyzed.

Credits

5

General Education Code

IM

ANTH 110S Evolution of Democracy

Examines the state and its institutions from a historical, social, and cross-cultural perspective, paying attention to the varied discourses and practices that constitute what we call the state.

Credits

5

Instructor

Alejandra Kramer

General Education Code

PE-H

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 110T Motherhood in American Culture

Examines the culture wars around motherhood in the United States with a focus on the political mobilization of normative ideas about the correct way to mother, from the moment of conception on. Special attention is given to the historical construction of deviant motherhood among marginalized groups. (Formerly course 80T.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Megan Moodie

General Education Code

ER

ANTH 110U Histories and Cultures of Piracy

An interdisciplinary yet anthropologically informed approach to studying pirates and piracy across different historical eras and spaces. Explores the role of pirates in world history from ancient to present times, including piracy both at sea and online.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nidhi Mahajan

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 110V Virtual Values: The Cultural Politics of Information Technology

Credits

ANTH 110W Land and Waterscapes Entropology

Establishes anthropological interconnections of emergent worlds where environmental matters, social justice, and human survival interrelate. Focuses on anti-essential nature and waterscape ethnographies in which different pluricultures revalidate local understandings as ways of contesting increasing forms of land and water privatization.

Credits

5

Instructor

Guillermo Delgado-P

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 110Y Feeding California

Online course introducing students to social practices, political processes, and cultural contexts that shape food production and consumption. Considers identity, heritage, choice, power, agency, body practices, belonging, access, safety, and security. Prioritizes California case studies, with comparative examples from around the world.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

General Education Code

PE-H

ANTH 110Z Infrastructure: Designing and Hacking Power in the Everyday

Credits

ANTH 111 Human Ecology

Reviews the environmental, physiological, behavioral, and cultural ways that humans interact with their physical surroundings. The effects of human culture on the environment and of the environment on the shape of human culture is emphasized.

Credits

5

Instructor

Lars Fehren-Schmitz

ANTH 112 Life Cycles

Examines the human life cycle using an evolutionary framework. Examines key aspects of the human life stages using findings and concepts from developmental biology, physiology, nutrition, evolutionary ecology, and life-history theory.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1.

ANTH 113 Tutoring Writing in Anthropology

Trains students to tutor writing in undergraduate anthropology courses; supports and guides them during the quarter they are tutoring. Enrollment by interview only. Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Composition requirement.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 118 Globalization of Development

Credits

ANTH 118L Globalization of Development Laboratory

Credits

ANTH 119 Indigenous Visual Culture

Examines the relationship between visual cultures and indigenous peoples. First, class discusses what is visual anthropology. Second, class examines the relationship between museums and indigenous peoples. Third, class examines ethnographic photography and indigenous uses of photography. Fourth, class examines the uses of ethnographic film, and then its relationship to indigenous peoples. Finally, class examines indigenous uses of film.

Credits

5

Instructor

Renya Ramirez

ANTH 120 Culture in Film

Introduces current and historical issues in visual anthropology, using film as a medium with which to represent culture. Raises questions about visual representation and advocacy in the context of global inequalities.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2 or ANTH 80J or FILM 20A or FILM 20B, or HAVC 10D, or HAVC 10E, HAVC 10F or HAVC 10G.

General Education Code

IM

ANTH 121 Socialism

Ethnography-based course that examines the social worlds of socialism, with particular focus on state socialism. Topics include: social problems that inspired socialist movements; implementation and experience of socialism in daily life; and significance of class, race, nation, science, technology, rationality.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

ANTH 122 Postsocialism

Examines the demise of socialist systems. Addresses the political, social, cultural, and economic experiences of everyday life that led to that demise, what new social inequalities have arisen since, and how citizens use the socialist past to critique the present.

Credits

5

ANTH 123 Psychological Anthropology

An introduction to some of the central theoretical issues in psychological anthropology. Psychoanalytic, cognitive, and relativist perspectives on the link between person and society are discussed and compared.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

ANTH 124 Anthropology of Religion

Study of the phenomenon of religion as manifested in ethnographic literature, with special attention to traditional and recent modes of analysis of religious behavior. Special topics include myth, religious healing, witchcraft and sorcery, ritual, and millenarian movements.

Credits

5

ANTH 125 Magic, Science, and Religion

With a theoretical understanding of the concepts of magic, science, and religion, students draw on ethnographies of these practices to critique distinctions between them and critically analyze the understanding of these categories and their relation in the modern world

Credits

5

Instructor

Annapurna Pandey

General Education Code

PE-H

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 126 Contraband: Shadow Economies and the Law

Course takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying contraband and smuggling. Focusing on concepts used to describe illegality we examine how "shadow economies" are central to the making of states and sovereignty, the legal and illegal being blurred.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

LGST 126C

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 127 Ethnographies of Capitalism

Challenges approaches to capitalism that treat it as socioeconomic relations separable from culture. Readings include ethnographies demonstrating the inextricability of cultural meanings from capitalist practices. Topics include capitalism's relationship to colonialism, nationalism, socialism, gender, and the commodification of aesthetics.

Credits

5

ANTH 128 Contemporary American Evangelical Cultures

Study of contemporary, American, born-again Protestant discourse using ethnographic materials and interpretive theories. Topics include biblical literalism, Christian conversion and self-fabulation, charismatic gifts, preaching, sacrificial giving, prosperity theology, apocalypticism, creationism, pro-family and pro-life rhetoric, and televangelism. (Formerly Born-Again Religion and Culture.)

Credits

5

ANTH 129 Beyond Borders: Other Globalizations and Histories of Interconnection

The history of social and cultural interconnections at a global scale. Anthropological approaches to the study of cultural encounter are used to investigate topics such as trade, religion, and citizenship and to evaluate shifting concepts of civilization and barbarism. (Formerly Other Globalizations: Cultures and Histories of Interconnection.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Nidhi Mahajan

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 130A Anthropology of Africa.

Survey of sub-Saharan societies. Analysis of principles of social organization and factors of cultural unity of selected western, eastern, central, and southern African peoples. (Formerly Peoples and Cultures of Africa)

Credits

5

Instructor

Savannah Shange-Binion

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 130B Brazil

Examines Brazilian culture and its link to interpersonal relationships, religion, politics, and psychological experience.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

General Education Code

CC

ANTH 130C Politics and Culture in China

Joins substantive information about Chinese society and culture with debates in social theory and rethinks conventional wisdom about colonialism and modernity. Topics include representations of Chineseness, class revolution, Chinese diaspora, popular culture, family and kinship, nationalism, history/memory, race and gender.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jerry Zee

General Education Code

CC

ANTH 130E Culture and Politics of Island Southeast Asia

Southeast Asia includes a variety of societies exhibiting many ecological adaptations, religions, marriage systems, and experiences with colonial powers. Case studies of particular societies, chosen to reveal variety, are examined comparatively. Emphasis on religion and social organization.

Credits

5

Instructor

A. Tsing

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

General Education Code

CC

ANTH 130F Blackness In Motion: Anthology of the African Diasporas

What connects Black communities in the Caribbean, the U.S., Latin America, and Canada, and what sets them apart? Examines theories of diaspora, gender and sexuality, slavery, colorism, music, U.S. hegemonies, social movements, and comparative racialization and global anti-blackness (Formerly African Diasporas in the Americas.)

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

CRES 130

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 130G Asian Americans in Ethnography and Film

Critically examines category of Asian Americans. Addresses historic representations of Asians and Asian Americans in ethnographic research and film. Explores contemporary issues of race, culture, and politics through ethnographic practice and cultural production.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nancy Chen

ANTH 130H Ethnography of Russia and Eastern Europe

Introduces students to the ethnography of Eurasia, with special attention to the lived experience and legacy of state socialism in this region. Topics include new ideas of personhood, changing economic practices, public health, and international development.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

General Education Code

CC

ANTH 130I Cultures of India

An examination of anthropological studies of tribal, rural, and urban cultures of India and a look at changes taking place in India.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 130J Politics and Statemaking in Latin America

Introduction to ethnohistory and political anthropology of one or more Latin American countries: Typically Mexico and one other country. Students explore how contested concepts such as indigeneity, nation or state come to gain credibility and are deployed in contemporary politics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Andrew Mathews

General Education Code

CC

ANTH 130L Ethnographies of Latin America

A broad introduction to issues and areas of cultural production and transformation in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. Colonial, neocolonial, class, ethnic, gender, religious, ecological, and political relations intersect as represented in ethnographies and film.

Credits

5

Instructor

Guillermo Delgado-P

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 130M Inside Mexico

Examines various communities within the Republic of Mexico as represented in ethnographic texts and other forms of cultural production, particularly music and dance. Emphasis on the interplay between the concept of regionalism and national identity. Previous course work in Mexican culture and/or history strongly recommended. Some reading in Spanish is required.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

ANTH 130N Native Peoples of North America

A survey of Native American cultures and experience during the past century, with emphasis on Pueblo cultures of the American Southwest.

Credits

5

General Education Code

ER

ANTH 130O Native Feminisms, Gender, and Settler Colonialism

Covers Native feminisms, gender, settler colonialism, and ethnography. Students read ethnographies that intervene in Native feminisms and its possibilities. Focuses on ethnographies in the U.S., including Native men and masculinities in Hawaii.

Credits

5

Instructor

Renya Ramirez

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 130P Ethnography of Southern Cone Chile and Argentina

Chile and Argentina, although both established within Spanish colonization and physically close, have dissimilar histories and culture. We explore areas of friction and overlap that shaped different peoples, institutions, cultural identities, and histories in countries that share a particular history.

Credits

5

Instructor

Alejandra Kramer

General Education Code

ER

ANTH 130R Provincializing America

Credits

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

ANTH 130S Ethnography of Russia and Eastern Europe, Abroad

This study abroad introduces the ethnography of Russia and Eastern Europe, with special attention to lived experience and legacy of state socialism. Topics: effects of socialism, changing economic practices; constructions of new identities; modernization/development; belief systems; and memory and history.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

ANTH 130T Religion and Politics in the Muslim World

Analyzes post-colonial forms of Islam, with particular attention to Muslim societies and cultures in the Middle East, North Africa, and Europe. Emphasizes the relationship between power, knowledge, and representation in anthropological approaches to Islam and Muslims. (Formerly Anthropological Approaches to Islam.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Mayanthi Fernando

General Education Code

ER

ANTH 130U Central America

Draws on political, economic, and anthropological perspectives to analyze the key role of transnationalism and neoliberalism in contemporary Central America. Key topics include: the aftermath of revolutions; labor and gender; indigenous movements and multiculturalism; and transnational migration and governance.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mark Anderson

ANTH 130V Ethnography of Russia

Examines daily life in Russia and affiliated formerly Soviet Republics through historical and cultural comparison. Topics include: socialist and postsocialist daily life; 20th- and 21st-century Russian empire building; cultural politics; economic systems; state-citizen relations; citizenship regimes; labor and leisure; and religion.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

ANTH 130W Ethnography of Eastern Europe

Examines daily life in Eastern Europe, especially how residents in this region have navigated the transition from state socialism to accession to the European Union. Topics include: the legacies of state socialism; cultural politics; new economies; consumption; the European Union; new forms of governance; and political activism.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

ANTH 130X Special Topics in Ethnography

This course on special topics in ethnography will be taught on a rotating basis by various faculty members. Precise focus of each year's courses will vary according to the instructor and will be announced by the department.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ANTH 131 Gender in Cross-Cultural Context

Examines the diversity of women's as well as men's roles, experiences, and self-conceptions in a number of societies to explore how women and men shape, and are shaped by, particular forms of social life.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 131H Russian-Language Readings Course: Readings in Anthropology of Russia

Contemporary topics and readings in anthropology of Russia and the former Soviet Union. All readings, films, and other materials are in Russian. Discussions are in English. Accompanies course 130H, Ethnography of Russia and Eastern Europe. Prerequisite(s): course 130H and proof of Russian proficiency in reading and writing. Enrollment by permission of instructor.

Credits

2

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

ANTH 133 Narratives of the Popular

Addresses the increasing importance of popular culture as the terrain upon which to address issues of culture and power. Emphasizes an ethnographic approach to popular culture as sociocultural phenomena. Students learn about a variety of activities including television and film viewing, music, fashion, photography, postcards, comic books, and urban spatial relations and architecture.

Credits

5

Instructor

Susan Harding

ANTH 134 Medical Anthropology: An Introduction

Cross-cultural study of health, disease, and illness behavior from ecological and ethnomedical perspectives. Implications for biomedical health care policy. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 254.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 135A Cities

Examines cities from an anthropological perspective. Reviews pertinent social scientific literature of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Surveys the concepts and methods used by contemporary anthropologists to investigate urban phenomena.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nancy Chen

ANTH 136 The Biology of Everyday Life

Addresses cross-cultural attitudes to the human body and its everyday biological concerns: sleeping, eating, breathing, sex, and defecation.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

ANTH 137 Consuming Culture

Explores consumption as a cultural form. Beginning with theories of capitalism and exchange, it then focuses on sites and modes of consumption and display such as department stores, museums and zoos, advertisements and photography, cultural tourism.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

ANTH 138 Political Anthropology

The ideas, in selected non-Western societies, about the nature of power, order, social cohesion, and the political organization of these societies.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

LGST 138

ANTH 139 Language and Culture

Examination of language system and language use in relationship to cultural contexts of communication in Western and non-Western societies. Topics include the Sapir-Whorf linguistic relativity hypothesis; linguistic constructions of gender; speech variation in relation to class, ethnicity, and national identity; and the emergence of self in communicative acts.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

ANTH 140 The Body in Rain: Environmental and Medical Intersections

Explores medical and environmental anthropologies, including how bodies-human and other-are implicated in processes often figured as environmental. Explores how the body and the environment combine and interact to form nexus of political, cultural, and material forces.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

CRES 140

Instructor

J. Zee

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 141 Anthropology of Developing Countries: Environment, Water, Entropy

Credits

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): course 2.

ANTH 142 Anthropology of Law

An ethnographically informed consideration of law, dispute management, and social control in a range of societies including the contemporary U.S. Topics include conflict management processes, theories of justice, legal discourse, and relations among local, national, and transnational legal systems.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

LGST 142

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to anthropology and legal studies majors.

ANTH 143 Performance and Power

Explores relationships between power and performance forms and media, both traditional and emergent. Links aesthetics with politics, and recent transcultural exchanges with local circumstances and consequences.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2 or any other Anthropology course.

ANTH 144 Anthropology of Poverty and Welfare

Examines phenomena of poverty and welfare in cross-cultural perspective with an emphasis on critical ethnographies and social analyses of social pathologies, economic systems, and community. Topics include informal economies, labor, household systems, social-support networks, and public policies.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

ANTH 145X Special Topics in Socio-Cultural Anthropology

Taught annually on a rotating basis by faculty members. Each year's topic varies by instructor and is announced by the department.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ANTH 146 Anthropology and the Environment

Examines recent approaches to study of nature and the environment. Considers historical relationship between nature, science, and colonial expansion as well as key issues of contemporary environmental concern: conservation, environmental justice, and social movements. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 246.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 147 Anthropology and the Anthropocene

Looks at how humans have lived with their environments in other times and places; the long-distance transfers of humans and other animals, as well as plants and microorganisms; and how we can best live in the Anthropocene.

Credits

5

Instructor

A. Tsing

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 148 Gender and Global Development

Uses the critical tools of feminist theory and cultural anthropology to look at how global development discourses and institutions mobilize, reinforce, and challenge systems of gender-based inequality. Topics include non-governmental organizations (NGOs), development practice, microcredit, and technocrat cultures. (Formerly Gender and Development.)

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 148

Instructor

Megan Moodie

ANTH 149 Anthropology of Activism

Examining activism from an anthropological perspective, students look at beliefs, ideals, and practices of social movements and those involved in them. Taking a procedural approach, course focuses on how things happen in unexpected ways, and examines activism as a collective matter.

Credits

5

General Education Code

ER

ANTH 150 Communicating Anthropology

Encourages anthropology majors to explore different means of communicating anthropology with much attention to individual writing and presentation skills. Intensive work on library research; recognizing, comparing, and making arguments; and analyzing ethnographies, articles, reviews, and films.

Credits

5

Instructor

M. Moodie

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): two of the following courses: ANTH 1, ANTH 2, or ANTH 3; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to sophomore and junior anthropology majors.

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 151 Workshop in Ethnography

Through demonstration, practice, and participation, acquire skills in collecting and analyzing cultural data. Work with members of other cultures and with each other to learn to identify significant cultural patterns. Lectures and readings provide added perspective and a theoretical base.

Credits

5

Instructor

Alejandra Kramer

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 152 Survey of Cultural Anthropological Theory

Major figures, ideas, and writings in 19th- and 20th-century cultural anthropology surveyed. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 252.

Credits

5

Instructor

A. Mathews

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2 and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; enrollment is restricted to anthropology majors.

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 153 Medicine and Colonialism

Addresses the overlapping relationship between medicine and colonialism in the 19th century, with attention to post-colonial theory and contemporary studies of post-colonial medical pluralism in the 20th century.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2 and ANTH 134.

ANTH 154L Multimedia Laboratory

Credits

Requirements

is Concurrent enrollment in ANTH 154 required.

ANTH 157 Modernity and Its Others

Beginning with the conquest of the Americas, considers how Western thinkers have explained seemingly irrational ways of being and thinking (like witchcraft, human sacrifice, and bodily mutilation), and asks how we interpret beliefs and practices radically different from our own.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mayanthi Fernando

ANTH 158 Feminist Ethnographies

Considers the relationship between anthropology and feminism. Provides historical perspective on gender inequalities in the discipline as well as the emergence of feminist anthropology. Students read and engage with examples of feminist ethnography form a variety of regions and subfields.

Credits

5

Instructor

Alejandra Kramer

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 159 Race and Anthropology

Examines concept of race in anthropology. Begins with histories of race in anthropology; turns to contemporary analysis of racism, identity formation, and diaspora; and concludes with current debates on the validity of race as an object of analysis.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mark Anderson

General Education Code

ER

ANTH 160 Reproductive and Population Politics

Examines reproductive and population politics across the globe, with a focus on feminist and ethnographic analyses of the stakes of various actors, from states to religious bodies to non-governmental organizations, in questions of who reproduces and in what circumstances.

Credits

5

Instructor

Megan Moodie

ANTH 161 The Anthropology of Food

Critically examines food as a fundamental aspect of social and cultural life and key concept in the development of anthropological theory and methods. Topics include: power relationships; community building; exchange and reciprocity; symbolism; cultural rules and rituals; globalization; and memory.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

General Education Code

PE-H

ANTH 161S Anthropology of Food, Abroad

Food as a fundamental aspect of social/cultural life and key concept in development of anthropological theory and methods. Studying abroad, investigations are grounded in local ethnographic context to learn how anthropologists study food, practice methods, and understand food's local importance.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PE-H

Quarter offered

Summer

ANTH 162 Anthropology of Displaced Persons

Examines the causes, consequences, forms, and experiences of human movement, displacement, and abandonment. Topics include: migration, refugees, forced displacement, environmental displacement, tourism, transnational communities, and other displaced populations.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

ANTH 163 Kinship

Provides a critical survey of debates, old and new, in the study of kinship. Readings range from classical treatments to recent reformulations that use kinship as a lens for exploring intimacy, memory, futurity, embodiment, commodification, and power. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 263.

Credits

5

Instructor

Danilyn Rutherford

ANTH 164 The Anthropology of Dance

An intense reading seminar which critically reviews anthropological works in dance ethnography and dance theory. Recommended for anthropology majors.

Credits

5

Instructor

Olga Najera Ramirez

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

ANTH 166 States, Bureaucracies , and Other Cosmological Propositions

Investigates the cosmologies of states and bureaucracies and the practices through which officials or rulers seek to produce order, knowledge, or stability. Looks at paperwork, nationalist and court rituals, practices of mapping and classification, forms of citizenship.

Credits

5

Instructor

Andrew Mathews

ANTH 170 History of Archaeological Theory

Historical review of prehistoric archaeology from antiquarianism to the present. Emphasis on development of archaeological theory and its relation to evolutionary and anthropological theory. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 270.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tsim Schneider

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to anthropology and Earth sciences/anthropology combined majors. Recommended for juniors.

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 171 Materials and Methods in Historical Archaeology

In this intensive, hands-on course, students learn the step-by-step processes involved in conducting laboratory research on historic artifacts. Students study the ins and outs of analyzing, cataloging, and dating historic artifacts.

Credits

5

Instructor

D. Dadiego

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 172 Archaeological Research Design

Develops practical skills for connecting archaeological theory and methods to grant writing, final reports and presentations. Examines elements of good research design, including the logic of scientific inquiry, ethics, project conceptualization, measurement, sampling, data analysis, and effective writing.

Credits

5

Instructor

D. Dadiego

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3. Enrollment is restricted to anthropology majors.

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 173 Origins of Farming

Survey of the ecological and archaeological evidence for the origins of plant and animal domestication in Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas. Discussion will center on the preconditions of this drastic alteration in human ecology and its consequences in transforming human societies. Open to nonmajors. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 273.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

ANTH 174 Origins of Complex Societies

Deals with evidence and theories concerning the origins of complex society; the transition from egalitarian, foraging societies to the hierarchical, economically specialized societies often referred to as civilizations. Focuses on both Old World and New World cultures. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 174.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3.

ANTH 175 African Archaeology

Introduces the evolution of African kingdoms and states from the emergence of farming communities to initial contact with Europe. Particular attention paid to the origins of social inequality and the evolution of centralized polities. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Anthropology 275B. (Formerly African Complex Societies.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3.

ANTH 175B African Complex Societies

Introduces the evolution of African kingdoms and states from the emergence of farming communities to initial contact with Europe. Particular attention paid to the origins of social inequality and the evolution of centralized polities. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Anthropology 275B.

Credits

5

Instructor

James Monroe

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): course 3; course 175A strong recommended.

ANTH 175C African Diaspora

Credits

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3; ANTH 175A and ANTH 175B strongly recommended.

ANTH 176A North American Archaeology

Development of Native cultures in North America. Topics include peopling of the New World, early foragers, spread of agriculture and complex societies in the Southwest and Eastern Woodlands, and review of cultural developments in the West and Far North.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3 or consent of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 176B Meso-American Archaeology

Review of the archaeological and ethnohistorical evidence for the origins and development of pre-Columbian civilizations in Meso-America including the Olmec, Maya, Zapotec, Mixtec Teotihuacan, Toltec, Tarascan, and Aztec.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3.

ANTH 176C Archaeology of the American Southwest

Outlines the development of native cultures in the American Southwest from Paleo-Indian times (Ca. 11,5000 B.C.) through early European contact (ca. A.D. 1600). Topics include the greater environment; early foraging culture; the development of agriculture and village life; the emergence and decline of regional alliances; abandonment and reorganization; and changes in social organization, external relations, and trade.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3 and ANTH 176A.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 176D Colonial Encounters in the Americas

Uses archaeological case studies to explore processes of cultural confrontation, resistance, and transformation among Native American groups in the wake of European colonial expansion in the Western Hemisphere during the late 15th through mid-19th centuries.

Credits

5

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2 and ANTH 3.

General Education Code

ER

ANTH 176E Archaeology of the Pacific Northwest

Explores some of the important issues surrounding the anthropological and archaeological study of the Pacific Northwest Coast--a roughly 1,800-kilometer-long shoreline that stretches from Yakutat Bay in Alaska to Cape Mendocino in California.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jon Daehnke

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3.

ANTH 176F California Archaeology

Introduces the Native peoples of California from an archaeological perspective. Covering the past 13,000 years, a variety of geographic and temporal settings are examined as well as current research in California archaeology.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tsim Schneider

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3.

ANTH 178 Historical Archaeology: A Global Perspective

Introduces the archaeology of European colonialism and the early-modern world. Topics include historical archaeological methods; the nature of European colonial expansion in New and Old Worlds; culture contact and change; and power and resistance in colonial societies. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Anthropology 278.

Credits

5

Instructor

James Monroe

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 180 Ceramic Analysis in Archaeology

Focuses on theories and techniques used by archaeologists to bridge the gap between the recovery of ceramic materials and their interpretation within cultural contexts. Topics include the origins of pottery, production methods, classification and typology, seriation, functional analysis, materials analysis and description, organization of production, trade, and the analysis of style. Students are billed a course materials fee. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 280.

Credits

5

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3. Concurrent enrollment in ANTH 180L required. Enrollment is restricted to anthropology majors.

ANTH 180L Ceramic Analysis Laboratory

Practicum in ceramic materials analysis and description. Students perform material experiments in materials selection and processing, hand-building techniques, and open-pit firing. Demonstrations of standard techniques of attribute analysis and the mineralogical and chemical characterization of ceramic materials are presented. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 280L.

Credits

2

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3. Concurrent enrollment in ANTH 180 required. Enrollment is restricted to anthropology majors.

ANTH 181X Special Topics in Archaeology

Taught annually on a rotating basis by various faculty members. Precise focus of each year's course varies according to the instructor and is announced by the department.

Credits

5

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ANTH 182A Lithic Technology

Introduction to lithic and ceramic analysis in archaeology. Includes lab analysis, discussions of classification and typology, and exploration of the concept of style as it relates to ceramics and lithics in archaeology.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3.

ANTH 184 Zooarchaeology

Lectures and seminar on archaeological faunal analysis. Topics include mammalian evolution and osteology, vertebrate taphonomy, reconstruction of human diet from faunal remains, foraging strategy theory, data collection and management, and methods of quantitative analysis. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 284.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3; concurrent enrollment in ANTH 184L is required.

ANTH 184L Zooarchaeology Laboratory

Practical laboratory in archaeological analysis, with demonstrations and exercises on human-caused modifications to animal bones and non-human modifications to animal bones.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3 and concurrent enrollment in ANTH 184. Enrollment is restricted to anthropology majors and combined Earth sciences/anthropology majors.

ANTH 185 Osteology of Mammals, Birds, and Fish

Practicum in archaeological faunal analysis. Students learn to identify bones of all larger mammal species of central California plus selected bird and fish species. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 285. Prerequisite(s): courses 184 or 102 or Biology 138/L or Earth Sciences 100 or Environmental Studies 105/L, and permission of instructor.

Credits

5

ANTH 187 Cultural Heritage in Colonial Contexts

Critical examination of the definitions of cultural heritage, its development as a concept, and the various laws, charters, and conventions that shape our management of the past in the present. The focus is on heritage in comparative colonial contexts.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jon Daehnke

ANTH 187B Cultural Resource Management

Explores how the past is managed or cared for in the present, especially in the context of the United States.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jon Daehnke

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3.

ANTH 188 Practicum in Archaeology

Credits

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3.

ANTH 188A Practicum in Archaeology A

Introduces practical skills in archaeological materials identification of stone, shell, bone, and other materials, curation, and database management. Students receive entry-level training with once-weekly class meetings and five hours per week of hands-on work. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3, and instructor consent. All three courses in sequence (ANTH 188A, ANTH 188B, ANTH 188C) required to count for the anthropology major or minor.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-S

ANTH 188B Practicum in Archaeology B

Introduces practical skills in archaeological materials identification of stone, shell, bone, and other materials, curation, and database management. Students receive entry-level training with once-weekly class meetings and five hours per week of hands-on work. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3, and instructor consent. All three courses in sequence (ANTH 188A, ANTH 188B, ANTH 188C) required to count for the anthropology major or minor.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 188C Practicum in Archaeology C

Two-credit course introducing practical skills in archaeological materials identification of stone, shell, bone, and other materials; curation; and database management. Students receive entry-level training with once-weekly class meetings and five hours per week of hands-on work. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH, 2, and ANTH 3. All three courses in sequence (188A, 188B, 188C) required to count for the anthropology major or minor.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-S

ANTH 189 Archaeology Field Methods

Lecture, laboratory, and fieldwork sessions on archaeological field methods including survey, mapping, excavation, record and database maintenance, artifact accessioning, curation, and analysis on the UCSC campus. Students attend lectures/laboratories two evenings each week and do fieldwork all day on Saturdays. Enrollment by instructor consent. Prerequisite(s): course 3 and application letter. Students who have done no previous fieldwork in archaeology have priority. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

General Education Code

PR-E

ANTH 190X Special topics in Biological Anthropology

Taught annually on a rotating basis by various faculty members. Precise focus of each year's course varies according to the instructor and is announced by the department. (Formerly Special topics in Archaeology-Physical Anthropology.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ANTH 194A Anthropology of Dead Persons

Explores the cultural meanings of dead bodies and dead persons, including memorialization; the body in the United States legal system; cadavers in education and research; dead persons in mass disasters and human-rights cases; and repatriation of the dead. Prerequisite(s): Satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements, and courses 1, 2, and 3. Enrollment restricted to senior anthropology and Earth sciences/Anthropology combined majors. Enrollment by permission of instructor.

Credits

5

ANTH 194B Chimpanzees: Biology, Behavior, and Evolution

Explores studies on wild and captive chimpanzees with reference to other apes and humans. Topics include sociality, tool using, locomotion, traditions, and life history; social and physical dimensions of growth and development; language studies, genetics, and applications to human evolution.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirement. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194C Feminist Anthropology

Considers feminist perspectives on the human past, archaeologists' perspectives on feminist theory, and the impact of gender, feminist, and critical social theory on archaeology as a profession. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 279.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirement. Enrollment restricted to senior anthropology and Earth sciences/Anthropology combined majors.

ANTH 194D Tribes/Castes/Women

Examines historical constructions and contemporary deployments of the categories that have structured popular and anthropological understandings of social life in South Asia, particularly those of tribe, caste, and women. Students gain familiarity with the mobilization of these categories in contemporary political movements across India.

Credits

5

Instructor

Megan Moodie

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3. Satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194E Belief

Focuses on problems and opportunities raised by the concept of belief. Students work to develop an anthropological understanding of belief as practiced, then put it to use in analyzing episodes from the NPR series This I Believe.

Credits

5

Instructor

Danilyn Rutherford

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3 and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194F Memory

Intensive and fast-paced seminar focusing on theoretical and ethnographic studies of memory as a means for dealing with the past. Examines how ordinary people and societies have coped with the past through acts of selective remembering and forgetting.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirement. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194G Politics and Secularism

Examines secularism as political doctrine and practice of government. Topics include: transformation of religion by secularization; forms of inclusion/exclusion enacted by secularism; relationship between secularism and colonial rule. Case studies drawn from Europe, South Asia, United States, and the Middle East.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mayanthi Fernando

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194H Paleoanthropology

Detailed overview of the evidence for the origin and evolution of humans with emphasis on reconstructing the paleobiology of extinct hominids. Discussion of individual groups of ancient hominids from the Miocene apes to anatomically modern humans.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology and Earth sciences/Anthropology combined majors.

ANTH 194I Consumption and Consumerism

Investigates cultural analysis of consumer society, commodities, and consumer practices. Students develop their own research projects. Themes include: critiques of consumer society; symbolic analysis of goods, consumption as resistance, anthropologies of marketing, culture jamming; consumption and (post) colonialism.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mark Anderson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirement. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194J Histories of Forests and Other Wild Places

Wild Nature has a history. This class offers tools for understanding the social and natural construction of wild nature. We will learn to read rural landscapes--ethnographically, biologically, historically, creatively, and politically.

Credits

5

Instructor

Anna Tsing

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194K Reading Ethnographies

Explores issues in the representation of culture through reading and discussing ethnographies. Recent experimental ethnographies open topics including the relation between fieldwork and writing, textual strategies, and the politics of ethnographic writing and research.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mayanthi Fernando

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194L Archaeology of the African Diaspora

Senior seminar on African diaspora archaeology. Draws on archaeological, historical, and anthropological perspectives to examine the cultural, social, economic, and political lives of Africans and their descendants in the New World and West Africa from the 15th through 19th centuries.

Credits

5

Instructor

James Monroe

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, ANTH 3 and an upper division course in archaeology; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirement. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194M Medical Anthropology

Focuses on critical issues in the social sciences of health and healing. Designed for students pursuing graduate work in medical anthropology and/or public health.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nancy Chen

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, ANTH 3, and ANTH 134; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194N Comparison of Cultures

Seminar for upper-division students interested in theories and methodology of social and cultural anthropology. Devoted to critical discussion of different methods of comparison practiced in anthropology.

Credits

5

Instructor

Triloki Pandey

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194O Masculinities

Considers the social construction of men and masculinities in a variety of ethnohistorical contexts as well as the unique contribution enabled by anthropological methods, particularly ethnographic fieldwork, to the study of gender and power.

Credits

5

Instructor

Megan Moodie

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3 and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194P Space, Place, and Culture

Examines ways anthropologists have studied relationship between space, place, and culture. Covers early formulations acknowledging people in different cultural contexts ascribe particular meanings to places and to the concept of space and then traces the ways these questions have come to the fore in more recent scholarship.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194Q Race, Ethnicity, Nation

Provides students with theoretical and methodological approaches to studying the relationships between race, ethnicity, and nation, with a comparative focus on the United States, Latin America, and Europe. Students use ethnographic methods and/or discourse analysis to develop individual research projects.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mark Anderson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements, and ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194R Religion, Gender, Sexuality

Examines religion in relation to gender and sexuality. Examines how gender, sexuality, and religion intersect in notions of civilization, progress, and modernity in the contemporary and colonial periods. Particular attention paid to Islam, Christianity, and Hinduism.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mayanthi Fernando

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements, and ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194S Hearing Culture: The Anthropology of Sound

Explores relationships between culture and acoustic worlds--environmental, verbal, and musical--within which we live. How sound is shaped by human belief and practice and the role sound plays in cultural and social life, both past and present.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194T Poverty and Inequality

Through ethnographies about homelessness, food deprivation, and unemployment, examines the institutions through which poverty is recognized, the systems of morality shaping debates about need and appropriate behavior, and the effects of community responses to poverty.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194U Environmental Anthropology: Nature, Culture, Politics

Presents key readings in environmental anthropology focusing on environmental conflicts. Students guided in developing research paper on a society environment topic of their choice. Class is writing intensive with in-class discussion and final presentations.

Credits

5

Instructor

Andrew Mathews

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194W The Anthropology of Social Movements

Focuses on the anthropology of social movements, especially the impact that global capital provokes on peripheral Latin American societies and the ways these respond through the organizing of social movements validating alternative worldviews that coalesce around issues pertaining to indigeneity, the environment, gender, and concepts of human dignity.

Credits

5

Instructor

Guillermo Delgado-P

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 194X Women in Politics: A Third World Perspective

Focuses cross-culturally on the status of women in the Third World and their formal and informal participation in politics. Also discussed are organized efforts, through participation in both national and autonomous movements, for women's rights.

Credits

5

Instructor

Annapurna Pandey, A. Kramer

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

Quarter offered

Fall, Spring

ANTH 194Y Archaeologies of Space and Landscape

Examines contemporary archaeological perspectives on space and landscape. Focuses on how archaeology can contribute to an appreciation of the economic, cultural, and political factors that shape human perception, use, and construction of the physical world.

Credits

5

Instructor

James Monroe

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3; an upper-division archaeology course; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 194Z Emerging Worlds

Addresses encounters and contact zones between cultures that give rise to emerging worlds. Emerging worlds refers to the cultural heterogeneity and diversity created within world-making networks, geographies, innovations, and meanings, moving us beyond ideas about vanishing, autonomous cultures.

Credits

5

Instructor

Lisa Rofel

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 195A Senior Thesis Seminar

Covers the basics like the planning and organization of research; writing research proposals; the publication and presentation of scientific research results; the recapitulation of laboratory methods; and intensification of specific recent research discussions in anthropology. Prerequisite(s): courses 1 and 107, and either course 101, or course 104, or course 105. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors and by permission of the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 295A.

Credits

5

Instructor

Lars Fehren-Schmitz

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 195B Senior Thesis Research

Students conduct the research projects they proposed in course 195A. Students have weekly group meetings with the research supervisor.

Credits

3

Instructor

Lars Fehren-Schmitz

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 195A. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 195C Senior Thesis Capstone

Students finalize their research projects and write their thesis in the form of a research paper that is in publishable form so it can be submitted to a relevant journal or conference.

Credits

3

Instructor

Lars Fehren-Schmitz

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 195B. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 195S Senior Thesis

Produce a quality research paper focusing on an anthropological topic of interest to you and that builds upon your experience in the major. Develop effective writing strategies and research skills to assist in professional development.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to anthropology majors. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 196C Traveling Cultures

Considers why traveling cultures have posed a threat, often met with violence, to regimes of rule, particularly modern nation-states. Also explores the unique problems that conducting research with mobile communities poses for the ethnographer.

Credits

5

Instructor

Megan Moodie

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; and ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 196D Food and Medicine

Examines the intersections of food, medicine, and culture with special focus on nutrition, cultural knowledge, industrial foodways, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), ethnopharmacology, food safety, and biosecurity.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nancy Chen

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; and ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 196E Pastoralists Past and Present

Senior seminar treating the history and modern situation of the world's herding peoples. Readings draw on ethnographic, historical, archaeological, and ecological literatures. Students are coached in writing a 25-page research paper on a topic related to this theme.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; and ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 196F The Anthropology of Things: Gift, Sign, Commodity, Tool

Examines some approaches used by anthropologists and other thinkers to bring things into focus: as gifts, signs, commodities, and tools. Explores whether, by taking things seriously, anthropologists might learn to be empirical in new ways. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 225.

Credits

5

Instructor

Danilyn Rutherford

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; and ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 196G Advanced Topics in Folkloristics

Examines selected topics and issues in the field of folklore: specific topics vary each quarter. For students with a demonstrated interest in folklore and/or popular culture.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; and ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3; and a course in folklore and/or popular culture is strongly recommended. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 196H Global History and the Longue Duree

Emerging anthropological approaches to global history, with an eye to historical frameworks of 500 years or more. Course requires engagement with advanced theoretical concepts and challenging historical texts. Intensive seminar format. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 269.

Credits

5

Instructor

Megan Moodie

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; and ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 196I Hard Problems

Explores interrelated, long-standing, difficult problems in human theory. Considers why these problems are so forbidding; what makes them significant; why they are hard; and whether hard problems come in different varieties or strengths.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3; and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 196J Imagining America

Explores sites of heritage and the politics of cultural memory in the American context. Focuses on public representation and interpretation at places where multiple views of history come into conflict.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jon Daehnke

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3 and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 196K Settler Colonialism

Provides seniors in anthropology a capstone experience. Settler colonialism is an all-encompassing, land-centered project that revolves around the elimination of the Native. This course revolves around a series of ethnographies and histories about settler colonialism.

Credits

5

Instructor

Renya Ramirez

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3 and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 196L Archaeology of the American Southwest

Outlines the development of native cultures in the American Southwest from Paleo-Indian times (ca. 11,500 B.C.) through early European Contact (ca. A.D. 1600).

Credits

5

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3 and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Course 178 is strongly recommended. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology and Earth sciences/Anthropology combined majors.

ANTH 196M Modernity and its Others

Examines how Western modernity has interpreted various forms of radical difference, beginning with the 15th-century conquest of the New World. Considers historical and contemporary examples of how Western thinkers have explained irrational beliefs and practices (e.g., witchcraft, human sacrifice, devil-worship).

Credits

5

Instructor

Mayanthi Fernando

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3; and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

ANTH 196P Disability and Difference

Challenges limiting conceptions of what it means to be human in a range of arenas, from our understandings of culture to our conceptions of built space to our assumptions about citizenship, asking why disability makes people nervous.

Credits

5

Instructor

Danilyn Rutherford

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3; and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior Anthropology majors.

ANTH 196R Design Anthropology

Senior seminar introduces students to principles, approaches, methods, and professional dimensions of design anthropology. Emphasizes collaborative methods and development of new methods for ethnographic research, analysis, and communication. Through a quarter-long research project, students develop professional skills and portfolio materials. Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment restricted to senior anthropology majors and is by permission. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 208C.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 196T Archaeology of Technology

Examines approaches mobilized by archaeologists to reconstruct ancient technologies and to explore how technological practices are implicated in processes of social formation and change. Approaches that engage technology as embodied technique and situated cultural practice are emphasized.

Credits

5

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirement. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology and Earth sciences/Anthropology combined majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 196U Historical Anthropology

Provides seniors in anthropology a capstone experience. Involves critical engagement with archaeological, ethnohistorical, ethnographic, and oral line of evidence to evaluate the outcomes of indigenous people's interactions with different forms of missionary, settler, and mercantile colonialism.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tsim Schneider

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology and Earth sciences/Anthropology combined majors.

ANTH 196W Anthropology of Weather and Exposure

Students discuss how differing approaches to weather and exposure generate different approaches to culture, science, and politics; identify key moments in cultural anthropology's engagement with environmental and climactic questions; and delineate new areas of research.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jerry Zee

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3. Satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior Anthropology majors.

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 197 Laboratory Tutorial

Independent laboratory research on selected topics in archeology and physical anthropology. Interview with appropriate instructor required.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 197F Laboratory Tutorial

Independent laboratory research on selected topics in archaeology and physical anthropology. Interview with appropriate instructor required. Enrollment restricted to anthropology majors.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 198 Independent Field Study

Off-campus field study. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 198F Ind Field Study

Ind Field Study

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ANTH 198G Independent Field Study

Off-campus field study. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

3

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

ANTH 199 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 199F Tutorial

Tutorial

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ANTH 200 Theoretical Foundations of Physical Anthropological Research

Provides historical and theoretical foundation of physical anthropology. Grounds students in the changing frameworks and perspectives during the last 150 years regarding questions in human biology, evolution, nature, and culture, by examining texts and scientific journals.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 200A Cultural Graduate Core Course

Introduces history, ethnography, and theory of cultural anthropology with emphasis on awareness of construction of anthropological canon and areas of conflict within it, leading up to contemporary debates on a variety of issues. Two-term course: students must enroll in both quarters. (Formerly Core Graduate Course.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to anthropology graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 200B Cultural Graduate Core Course

Introduces history, ethnography, and theory of cultural anthropology with emphasis on awareness of construction of anthropological canon and areas of conflict within it, leading up to contemporary debates on a variety of issues. Multiple-term course; students must enroll in both quarters to receive academic credit. (Formerly Core Graduate Course.)

Credits

5

Instructor

A. Mathews

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to anthropology graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 201 Human Evolution

Provides an overview of the first five million years of human evolution and a framework for studying evolution and reconstructing the human past. Emphasizes that all lines of evidence must be included: hominid fossils, archaeology, paleoecology, and molecular data.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 202A Skeletal Biology

Focuses on human skeletal biology, the identification of elements, physiology of hard tissue formation, growth, and maintenance. Students are required to show competence in skeletal identification to pass this class.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 102A or permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 208A Ethnographic Practice

Introduces graduate students to the practice of fieldwork. Students design and carry out a quarter-long research project exploring a range of methods and producing an analytical case study. Readings and discussion emphasize both methodological critique and successful implementation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Megan Moodie

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to anthropology graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 208C Design Anthropology

Introduces the principles, approaches, methods, and professional dimensions of design anthropology. Emphasis is on collaborative methods and development of new methods for ethnographic research, analysis, and communication. Through a quarter-long research project, students develop non-academic professional skills, including portfolio materials. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 196R.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

Requirements

Open to second-year graduate students and higher (first-year students are required to take ANTH 208A).

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 210R Religion in American Politics and Culture

Introduces dominant discourses about major American religions and their role in public life with particular attention to intersecting differences, such as race, sex/gender, and disability and to shifting religious/political boundaries. Visual and textual media, political commentary, and popular ethnographies are analyzed.

Credits

5

Instructor

D. Rutherford

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 211 Human Ecology

Reviews environmental, physiological, behavioral, and cultural ways that humans interact with their physical surroundings. Effects of human culture on the environment, and of the environment on the shape of human culture will be emphasized.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 212 The Human Life Cycle

Examines the human life cycle using an evolutionary framework. Examines key aspects of the human life stages using findings and concepts from developmental biology, physiology, nutrition, evolutionary ecology, and life history theory. These stages include: gestation, infancy, childhood, juvenile and adolescent periods, and senescence. Each stage of the life cycle is compared and contrasted with the developmental life of nonhuman primates and mammals. Other related topics include developmental plasticity and epigenetics.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 214 Culture and Power

Takes the many strands of scholarship on power relations between individuals within the context of institutions and conceptualizes how individuals come to exist through power relations, and how power is fundamental to social being.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 216 Methods in Biological Anthropology

Deepens students' understanding of methods applied in biological anthropology research. (Formerly Methods in Physical Anthropology.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Lars Fehren-Schmitz

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 219 Religions, States, Secularities

Examines theories and case studies at the intersection of religion, states, and secularity. Topics include: secularism as a political doctrine; state and social regulation of religion and religious normativity; secular cultural practices; and lines of secular/religious entanglement and conflict.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 220 Cartographies of Culture

Examines, theoretically and ethnographically, how societies and their cultures are created and reified through spatializing practices, including border-making, mapping, landscape aesthetics, globalization, time/history/memory, movement, and other locating activities.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 224 Anthropology of Secularism

Examines secularism as a practice of government with a concomitant set of ethics. Topics include: the notion of religion necessary for secularism; forms of moral and political inclusion/exclusion enacted by secular governance; and the kind of ethical subject secularism engenders. (Formerly course 255.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 225 The Anthropology of Things: Sign, Gift, Commodity, Tool

Examines some approaches used by anthropologists and other thinkers to bring things into focus: as gifts, signs, commodities, and tools. Explores whether, by taking things seriously, anthropologists might learn to be empirical in new ways. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 196F.

Credits

5

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 228 Grant Writing

Devoted entirely to writing grant proposals. Students either work on their graduate education fellowships or their doctoral dissertation grants or both. Reading materials consist of granting agency documents plus examples of successful applications.

Credits

5

Instructor

M. Fernando

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to anthropology graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 229 Constructing Regions

Discusses centrality of the idea of regions in studies of culture, the history of locating social theory, and debates about area studies. Students develop area of transregional bibliographies. Primarily for second- or third-year anthropology graduate students reading area literatures.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jerry Zee

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 230 Bodies, Images, Screens

Visuality as epistemology, image-consumption, and the political and representational possibilities stemming from digitization and the World Wide Web are increasingly important issues in the humane sciences. Offers historical and critical background and the possibility of hands-on practice using visual material in current research. (Formerly Photography and Image Culture.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 231 Intimacy and Affective Labor

Examines recent work on the role of intimacy and affective labor in value production, political mobilization, and transnational capital linkages. Special attention given to how these terms are invoked to answer methodological and narrative concerns in ethnographic writing.

Credits

5

Instructor

Megan Moodie

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 232 Bodies, Knowledge, Practice

Contemporary social theory and science both focus on bodies as critical sites of inquiry and the production of knowledge. Explores these theoretical intersections and constructions of the body with new ethnographic works. Questions how race, gender, and culture are inscribed through bodily practice, imagery, and phenomenology.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nancy Chen

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 233 Politics of Nature

Advanced graduate seminar in environmental anthropology and science and technology studies, focusing on how nature is produced in the modern world and what political and practical significance this has in different contexts.

Credits

5

Instructor

Andrew Mathews

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 234 Feminist Anthropology

Examines how feminist anthropology creates its objects of knowledge by focusing on questions of method and representation. The class reads across these traditional objects--women and gender, for example--to highlight the epistemological and political stakes of feminist work in anthropology.

Credits

5

Instructor

Megan Moodie

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 235 Language and Culture

An examination of language system and language use in relationship to cultural contexts of communication in Western and non-Western societies. Also examines the complex role which linguistic inquiry and models have played in broader theories of culture.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 238 Advanced Topics in Cultural Anthropology

Advanced topics in cultural anthropology. Current topics in anthropological theory and ethnography taught on a rotating basis by various faculty members. Precise focus of each seminar varies and will be announced by the department.

Credits

5

Instructor

M. Fernando, A. Tsing

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter

ANTH 241 Social Justice

Explores theoretical and methodological issues in the field of social justice with an emphasis on ethnographic analysis. Topics include: rights, obligations, justice, equality, compensation, and ethics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 243 Cultures of Capitalism

Introduction to selected themes in political economy, stressing the work of Marx. Topics include the development of capitalism, colonialism, dependency, world systems, state formation, class consciousness, commodity fetishism, the nature of late capitalism, post-modernism, and the aesthetics of mass culture. Through political economy's interlocutors, raises questions about gender, race and ethnicity, and post-structuralist critiques.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 246 Advanced Readings in Environmental Anthropology

Survey of history and topics of contemporary interest in environmental anthropology, including political ecology, environmental history, ethnoecology, and multi-species anthropology. Additional advanced readings on contemporary environmental anthropology research. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 146.

Credits

5

Instructor

Andrew Mathews

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to Anthropology graduate students or by permission of the instructor.

ANTH 247 Critical Perspectives on Nutrition

Examines emerging critiques on the science, communication, and practice of nutrition using multidisciplinary approaches. Special attention is given to the effects of modern nutrition.

Credits

5

Instructor

Julie Guthman

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 248 Shadowy Dealings: Anthropology of Finance, Money, and Law

Moves from a brief introduction to classic economic anthropology to recent work on histories of money and capitalism and cultures of financial markets, of accounting, and of legal and illegal trading practices

Credits

5

Instructor

Nidhi Mahajan

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 249 Ecological Discourses

Explores narratives of nature and their practical consequences in contests over wild places and their resources. Readings focus on the histories of forests and on analytic frameworks—ecology, social history, interpretation, cultural studies—with which to investigate competing constructions of the environment.

Credits

5

Instructor

Anna Tsing

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 252 Survey of Cultural Anthropological Theory

Major figures, ideas, and writing in 19th- and 20th-century cultural anthropology surveyed. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 152.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 253 Advanced Cultural Theory

Examines cultural anthropology's interdisciplinary practices of knowledge formation at an advanced level. Drawing on various types of theoretical texts, the course elaborates on the relationship between culture and power, taking up different themes each time it is taught.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mark Anderson

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 254 Medicine and Culture

Surveys medicine cross-culturally, with particular focus on power, tradition, and theories of embodiment. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 134.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 255 Regulating Religion/Sex

First examines the regulation of religion and the normalization of sex/sexuality as parallel modalities of secular rule in the production of modern citizens and subjects. Ultimately inquires into the relationship between proper religion and proper sexuality in secular state formations. (Formerly course 259.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Mayanthi Fernando

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 258 Experimental Cultures

Addresses the use of experiments in anthropological research, theory, and writing.

Credits

5

Instructor

Megan Moodie

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 259 Race in Theory and Ethnography

Explores theoretical and methodological approaches to the cross-cultural study of race, with an emphasis on historical and ethnographic analysis. Main approaches considered include Foucauldian, Gramscian, diaspora theory, and the everyday poetics and politics of race. (Formerly course 246.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Mark Anderson

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 260 Anthropology of Freedom

Examines conceptualizations and practices of freedom across geographical space and historical time. Readings drawn from Greek philosophy, Islamic, Christian, and Buddhist religious traditions. Enlightenment philosophy, liberal and neo-thought, and contemporary ethnographies.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mayanthi Fernando

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 261 Replication, Mimesis, and Fakery

Replicas, copies, and fakes anchored conceptually by the authentic/original enable the marketing of cultural commodities like arts and crafts, especially since the advent of photography. Course explores these commercial and signifying processes in the global art and culture market.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 262 Documenting Cultures

Follows the history of film and ethnography, media and methodology into the birth of cinema and anthropology in the early 20th century. Students learn theories of representation and media, conduct ethnographic research, and prepare a short film.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 263 Kinship

Provides a critical survey of debates, old and new, in the study of kinship. Readings range from classical treatments to recent reformulations that use kinship as a lens for exploring intimacy, memory, futurity, embodiment, commodification, and power. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 163.

Credits

5

Instructor

Danilyn Rutherford

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 269 Global History and the Longue Duree

Emerging anthropological approaches to global history. Considers both 500-year and much longer historical frameworks. For the former, the evidence of documents, both European and non-European, is particularly important. For the latter, archaeological and evolutionary approaches are essential. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 196H.

Credits

5

Instructor

Anna Tsing

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 270 History of Archaeology

Historical review of prehistoric archaeology from antiquarianism to the present. Emphasis on the development of archaeological theory, its relation to evolutionary and anthropological theory, and themes ongoing over time. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 170.

Credits

5

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 270A Archaeology Graduate Core Course: History of Archaeological Theory

Historical overview of archaeology, concentrating on archaeological practice in the English-speaking world from the late 19th through the 21st Centuries. Emphasis is on development of archaeological theory in its social context; its relation to evolutionary and anthropological theory; and themes ongoing over time. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 270.

Credits

5

Instructor

James Monroe

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 270B Current Directions in Archaeological Theory

Provides an in-depth understanding of current trends in archaeological thought, and enables students to place issues of archaeological interpretation into broader historical and theoretical frameworks. This course is a follow-up to course 270, but not a substitute.

Credits

5

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 270A. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 272 Advanced Archaeological Research

Introduces graduate students to archaeological research design. Topics include: middle range theory; multistage research strategies; sampling strategies and appropriate field methodology; and issues specific to particular scales of archaeological analysis (artifact, household, site, region).

Credits

5

Instructor

J. Daehnke

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 273 Origins of Farming

Survey of the ecological and archaeological evidence for the origins of plant and animal domestication in Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas. Discussion will center on the preconditions of this drastic alteration in human ecology and its consequences in transforming human societies. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 173.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 274 Origins of Complex Societies

The origins of complex society: the transition from egalitarian foraging societies to the hierarchical, economically specialized societies often referred to as states or civilizations. Focuses on both Old World and New World cultures. Students may not receive credit for this course and course 174.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 275 Tutorial in African Archaeology

Graduate tutorial on the archaeology of precolonial African kingdoms and states. Particular attention paid toward the origins of social inequality and the evolution of centralized politics. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 175.

Credits

5

Instructor

James Monroe

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 276A Advanced Topics in North American Archaeology

In-depth examination of development of Native cultures in North America from end of last ice age to time of European contact. Focuses on specific regional trajectories and problems of social change.

Credits

5

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 276B Mesoamerican Archaeology

Examines the pre-Columbian cultures of Mesoamerica and reviews the archaeological and ethnohistorical evidence related to the origins and development of cultures including the Olmec, Maya, Zapotec, Mixtec, and Aztec. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 176B.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 276G Archaeology of Colonial Borderlands

This seminar draws from readings in archaeology, history, and Native American/Indigenous studies to assess borderlands throughout colonial-era North America as important arenas of change and continuity for indigenous societies, including indigenous technologies, foodways, gender roles, governance, and much more.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tsim Schneider

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 278 Tutorial on Historical Archaeology

Tutorial on archaeology of European colonialism and the early-modern world. Focuses on the nature of European colonial expanison in New and Old Worlds; culture contact and change; and power and resistance in colonial societies. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 178.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 279 Feminism and Gender in Archaeology

Considers feminist perspectives on the human past; archaeologists' perspectives on feminist theory; and the impact of gender, feminist, and critical social theory on the archaeological profession. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 194C.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 280 Advanced Ceramic Analysis

Advanced graduate seminar that focuses on techniques and theories used to bridge the gap between the recovery of ceramic remains from archaeological contexts and their interpretation with respect to various anthropological issues and problems. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 180.

Credits

5

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Concurrent enrollment in ANTh 280L is required.

ANTH 280L Advanced Ceramic Analysis Laboratory

Emphasizes advanced techniques of ceramic analysis, including materials selection and processing, hand-building, and open-pit firings. Standard techniques for describing and measuring formal and technological attributes of pottery also presented. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 180L.

Credits

2

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Concurrent enrollment in ANTH 280 is required.

ANTH 282 Household Archaeology

Explores the theoretical and methodological challenges faced by archaeologists excavating ancient households. Students examine the social, economic, and political characteristics of households and investigate how they intersect and support the social and physical aspects of communities.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 284 Tutorial in Zooarchaeology

Lectures and seminar on archaeological faunal analysis. Topics include: mammalian evolution and osteology; vertebrate taphonomy; reconstruction of human diet from faunal remains; foraging strategy theory; data collection and management; and methods of quantitative analysis. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 184. (Formerly Zooarchaeological Research Design.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 285 Osteology of Mammals, Birds, and Fish

Practicum in vertebrate osteology, covering all larger mammal species of central California, plus selected bird and fish species, and topics in evolution and ecology of selected taxa. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 185.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 287 Advanced Topics in Archaeology

A graduate seminar on advanced theoretical or methodological topics pertinent to advanced graduate student and faculty interests.

Credits

5

Instructor

J. Daehnke

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students or by consent of instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 287A Advanced Topics: Indigenous Archaeology

Traces the development of indigenous archaeology primarily in North America. Topics include: the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) and issues of cultural patrimony; postcolonialism; decolonizing methodologies; community-based research; oral sources and other ways of knowing the past; and future directions.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tsim Schneider

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 290T Pedagogy of Anthropology

Provides training in scientifically backed educational practices for new Anthropology TAs. Through reading, class discussion and activities, we explore different methods of teaching and ways to conceptualize pedagogy. Includes teaching theories; survey of educational tools and techniques; and lesson planning.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to anthropology graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 292 Graduate Colloquium

Designed to offer an institutionalized mechanism for the presentation of research papers and teaching efforts by faculty and advanced graduate students.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 294N Comparison of Cultures

Seminar for students interested in theories and methodology of social and cultural anthropology devoted to critical discussion of different methods of comparison practiced in anthropology.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 294R Advanced Readings in Biological Anthropology

Introduces literature relevant to students' research emphases and allows for discussion of new scientific publications. (Formerly Graduate Readings in Behavioral Ecology.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Viktoria Oelze

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 295A Scientific Method: Biological Anthropology

The first core course of the Biological Anthropology Graduate Program. Students learn the principles and methods by which research projects in biological anthropology are devised and executed. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 195A.

Credits

5

Instructor

Lars Fehren-Schmitz

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 297A Independent Study

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 297B Independent Study

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 297C Independent Study

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 297F Independent Study

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

ANTH 298 Advanced Laboratory Apprenticeship

Supervised tutorial in specialized analytic methods in archaeology or physical anthropology. Students collaborate on laboratory research with a departmental mentor or, with advisor's consent, with researchers on or off campus, preparing a manuscript for publication or an extensive literature review. Permission of instructor required. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 299A Thesis Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 299B Thesis Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 299C Thesis Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

APLX 80 Introduction to Applied Linguistics

Introduces the field of applied linguistics, learning about language acquisition, use, and teaching in multilingual contexts from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Also, introduces research models that examine psycholinguistic, sociolinguistic, and/or educational aspects of multilingualism..

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Shigeko Okamoto, Eve Zyzik, Zsuzsanna Abrams, Bryan Donaldson, Mark Amengual

General Education Code

PE-H

Quarter offered

Fall

APLX 99 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

APLX 99F Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

APLX 101 Second-Language Acquisition

Introduces the field of second-language acquisition. Topics include contexts of acquisition, the impact of individual differences, and basic methods of data collection and analysis.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Eve Zyzik, Zsuzsanna Abrams, Bryan Donaldson, Mark Amengual, Donald Miller

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): APLX 80 or LING 50.

Quarter offered

Winter

APLX 102 Bilingualism

An overview of bilingualism. Focuses on bilingualism as an individual phenomenon (i.e., how two languages develop and are represented in the minds of individual speakers), and as a social one (i.e., how do bilinguals interact in a community and how does this context of language contact shape their linguistic identity).

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Eve Zyzik, Mark Amengual

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): APLX 80 or LING 50.

APLX 103 Second Language Speech

Examines themes related to the acquisition of L2 phonetics and phonology, including theories and models of L2 speech learning; phonetics and phonology in L2 acquisition; as well as the training effects on L2 pronunciation.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): APLX 80 or LING 50.

APLX 112 Language and Gender

Examines the relationship between language and gender. Topics include: gender differences in speech; linguistic gender norms and stereotypes; gender and the construction of identity in discourse; sexuality and language; sexism in language; social, educational, and political implications. (Formerly Languages 112.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Shigeko Okamoto

Quarter offered

Spring

APLX 113 Inter-Cultural Communication

Examines intercultural communication and miscommunication between individuals and speech communities, both within North American and global contexts. Through discourse and analytic approaches, students explore cultural stereotypes and interactional expectations, among other issues, that influence the outcome of intercultural communication. (Formerly Languages 113, Cross-Cultural Communication and Miscommunication.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Zsuzsanna Abrams

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

General Education Code

CC

APLX 115 Language and Power

Examines the relationship between language and power. Explores the ways in which national languages, regional and social dialects, and specific phonological morpho-syntactic, or lexical features come to be associated with particular social meanings and contribute to creating social inequality.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Shigeko Okamoto, Zsuzsanna Abrams

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): APLX 80. Enrollment is restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

APLX 116 Discourse Analysis: Language Use and Context

Familiarizes students with the methods and theoretical assumptions behind discourse analytic approaches to the study of language. Examines language used in specific contexts. Topics include: genres, registers; discourse organization; discourse grammar; interaction; conversation; pragmatics; and social practice.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Bryan Donaldson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): LING 50 or by consent of the instructor. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Quarter offered

Fall

APLX 122 Linguistic Diversity & Social Justice

Explores the relationship between linguistic diversity and social justice: the celebration of multilingualism on the one hand and the negative experiences of people who speak "minority" languages in "dominant" cultural contexts on the other.

Credits

5

Instructor

Zsuzsanna Abrams

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): APLX 80; enrollment restricted to applied linguistics and multiculturalism, language studies, and linguistics majors.

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Fall, Spring

APLX 135 Second Language Teaching

Introduces the theories of second-language acquisition and their connection to second-language teaching. Students develop cutting-edge teaching and testing materials, and engage with current scholarship on language instruction. Prerequisite(s): at least one year of college-level study of a foreign language, or its equivalent. Enrollment restricted to juniors and seniors, and by permission of instructor. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 235.

Credits

5

Instructor

Eve Zyzik, Zsuzsanna Abrams, Donald Miller

Quarter offered

Spring

APLX 136 Second Language Assessment

Introduces the fundamentals of second-language testing by presenting theories, key concepts, and practical applications in language assessment. Throughout the course, students develop their own assessment portfolios, creating materials they can use in their post-BA career.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): APLX 135 or by permission of the instructor..

APLX 190 Research Seminar in Applied Linguistics

Prepares students to conduct research in applied linguistics. Students evaluate published studies that represent both quantitative and qualitative methods.

Credits

5

Instructor

Shigeko Okamoto, Eve Zyzik, Zsuzsanna Abrams, Bryan Donaldson, Mark Amengual

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): APLX 80 and APLX 101; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to seniors.

Quarter offered

Spring

APLX 199 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

APLX 199F Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

APLX 235 Second Language Teaching

Helps novice instructors learn about the theory and practice of language teaching and learning. Focuses on current methods used in communicatively oriented classrooms. Topics include: listening comprehension, grammar, vocabulary, reading, writing, and testing/assessment. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 135. (Formerly Language Studies 201.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Eve Zyzik, Zsuzsanna Abrams

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

ARBC 1 First-Year Arabic

Introduction to Arabic language and Arabic-speaking culture with practice in all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Intended for students with no previous study of Arabic as well as heritage speakers.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

ART 10D 2D Foundation

Introduces students to the fundamental principles of two-dimensional art and design and focuses on analyzing the concepts of line, color shape, value, space, form, unity, balance, scale, proportion, texture, and emphasis to be used to express complex ideas. This course is a hybrid studio/lecture. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

K. Gillette

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 10E 3D Foundation

Introduces students to the fundamental principles of three-dimensional art and design through basic concepts, techniques, and technical practice. Focuses on three-dimensional art and the design fundamentals of sculpture, public art, architecture, and the industrial-design process and production. This course is a hybrid studio/lecture. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Y. Harris

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Fall

ART 10F 4D Foundation

Introduces students to the fundamental principles of four-dimensional/time-based art and design through basic concepts, techniques, and technical practices. Computers and video, photo, sound, and lighting equipment are used to create short-form, time-based work. This course is a hybrid studio/lecture.

Credits

5

Instructor

K. Gillette

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Spring

ART 15 Introduction to Drawing for the Major

Introduction to the methods, materials, and purposes of drawing to develop perceptual and conceptual skills through a series of assignments, providing various approaches to drawing as a tool for creative exploration. Discussions and critiques facilitate the development of critical skills. Designed for students considering the art major. Students are billed a materials fee. (Formerly course 20.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Frank Galuszka, Melissa Gwyn

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Summer

ART 20G Introduction to Print Media and Drawing

Introduces the methods, materials, and history of printmaking and drawing as a tool for creative exploration. Understanding and development of concepts and skills are achieved through a series of lectures, studio demonstrations and practice, assignments, and critiques. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jimin Lee, Enrique Martinez Leal

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): two courses from ART 10D, ART 10E, ART 10F. Enrollment is restricted to proposed art and art majors.

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Fall, Spring

ART 20H Introduction to Sculpture and Public Art

Introduces sculpture and art in public space. The course is composed of lectures, readings, discussions, studio assignments, and demonstrations. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jennifer Parker, Laurie Palmer, W. Hibbert-Jones

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): two courses from ART 10D, ART 10E, ART 10F. Enrollment is restricted to proposed art and art majors.

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ART 20I Introduction to Photography

Introduces basic skills and conceptual development in photography and related digital media through image-making in the field, on the web, and in laboratories, through readings, discussions, and critiques. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

K. Karlic, K. Perry

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): two courses from ART 10D, ART 10E, ART 10F. Enrollment is restricted to proposed art and art majors.

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter

ART 20J Introduction to Drawing and Painting

Introduces the material practices of painting in combination with the formal vocabulary of the visual arts. A discussion of values, form, color, and figure/ground relationships enters into each class. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Melissa Gwyn, Tim Craighead

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): two courses from ART 10D, ART 10E, ART 10F. Enrollment is restricted to proposed art and art majors.

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ART 20K Introduction to New Media and Digital Artmaking

Introduces digital and new media art practice. Explores the use of the computer as tool and medium. Provides a hands-on introduction to the fundamentals of graphics; digital-image acquisition and manipulation; video; web design; and computer programming. Lectures, readings, and discussions examine the history of technology artwork and technology's relationship to contemporary culture. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

E. Anderson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): two courses from ART 10D, ART 10E, ART 10F. Enrollment is restricted to proposed art and art majors.

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 20L Introduction to Drawing

Drawing course using traditional media taught online through demonstration videos, digital submissions, and small-group critiques. Introduces the basics of observational drawing in a progression designed to develop and build skills in sighting, measuring, value, and rendering. Familiarity with Canvas, access to a digital camera, and purchase of art supplies are required. Assumes 30 hours per week of coursework.

Credits

5

Instructor

Grant Whipple

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): two courses from ART 10D, ART 10E, ART 10F. Enrollment is restricted to proposed art and art majors.

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

ART 26 Introduction to Printmaking

Survey of print medium: basic terminology, techniques, application of tools, materials, and condensed history of development of printmaking. Assignments consist of individual and collaborative projects aimed at building skills and gathering technical experience. Introduction to relief printing (black and white and color), intaglio, letterpress, and interface between photography/computer and the handmade print. Exploration of print media for communication of issues including formal aesthetics, social/psychological and personal narrative. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

B. Henry, J. Lee

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Summer

ART 80B Environmental Art

Examines ways artists engage, interact, and comment upon ecology and nature in their artworks by examining environmental art from the 1960s through the present.

Credits

5

Instructor

Elizabeth Stephens

General Education Code

PE-E

ART 80D Fundamentals of Photography

Introductory course for beginners. Various techniques examined and assigned in specific exercises. Work on projects using color film; this is a non-darkroom course. Examples given of photography from 1826 to the present. Balances historical study and practice through assigned homework exercises. Students must provide their own camera, preferably one with a manual setting. No phone cameras allowed. Students are billed a materials fee. (Formerly Introduction to Photography.)

Credits

5

Instructor

K. Perry

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Fall

ART 80E Environmental Art in the Expanded Field

Examines the ways artists engage, interact, and comment upon ecology and nature in their artworks by examining environmental art from the 1960s through the present. Offers students a foundational introduction to art and artists working in the field of environmental and ecological art/activism.

Credits

5

Instructor

Elizabeth Stephens

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 80F Introduction to Issues in Digital Media

Digital media was positioned as a radical new social and creative medium in the 1980s and 1990s. The ensuing decades have seen this area become ubiquitous mass media with structural inequalities, centralized ownership, environmental damage, and precarious labor conditions. At the same time, it has become the language of our time and remains a site of creativity and intervention and offers opportunities for social changes. This course provides an introduction to key issues in this area through the lens of race and ethnicity.

Credits

5

General Education Code

ER

ART 80T Digital Tools for Contemporary Art Practice

Introduces the digital tools and mediums available to contemporary art practices. Tools are explored from a historical and theoretical context and from a technical perspective through hands-on tutorials. A variety of artworks that use digital mediums are also examined. Covers photo and vector editors, sound and video editing, basic 3D modeling, and images and interactions generated by code. Students should have basic computer literacy.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kristen Gillette, Jennifer Parker

General Education Code

PE-T

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 80X Ars Erotica: Sexual Imagery in Culture and Art

What is sexually explicit imagery all about? Is it art, porn, trash, political hot potato, or hot commodity? This course enables students to critically explore these questions and more in an academic setting.

Credits

5

Instructor

E. Stephens

General Education Code

PE-H

ART 99 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ART 101 Introduction to Computer Programming for the Arts

Combines an introduction to computer programming for beginners with special topics that are essential for the digital arts. Basic concepts of programming are developed in the JavaScript language and applied to digital arts media, such as algorithmically generated still images and animations in two and three dimensions, sound art, and music composition. Presentation of digital artwork in the theater and via the web are covered in detail.

Credits

5

Instructor

Wesley Modes

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Spring

ART 102 Interactive Arts

Physical computing examines bodily sound, movement, and other physical phenomena as an interface to a computer or microcomputer. Students investigate electronics and devices for use in interactive art-making to create sculptural or installation-based projects. Students receive hands-on experience working with sensors, motors, switches, gears, lights, circuits, and hardware store devices to create kinetic and interactive works of art, programming and interface design. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Elliot Anderson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three courses from: ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26; or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 103 Interactive Art: Object, Interface, Robotics

Examines computer interactivity and interface in art making through theory and practice. Students develop interactive installation and sculptural works of art. Assignments may include the acquisition and creation of digital images, two-dimensional animation, programming with MAX/MSP/Jitter, basic electronics and sensors, and digital video and audio. Discussions, readings, and critiques address content, aesthetics, concepts, and expression as well as a practical grasp of relevant software. Students are encouraged to develop research projects and explore experimental practices. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Elliot Anderson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three courses from: ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26 or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 104 Digital Video

An exploration of the video medium including production using the digital video format. Digital video cameras will be used to produce digital source material to be manipulated in a non-linear digital editing system. Image manipulation, effects, and editing will be explored. A variety of video structures, theories, concepts, and forms will be examined through production, discussions, and viewing students' and artists' work.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Elliot Anderson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three courses from: ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26 or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 106A 2D Animation

Introduces animation techniques, practices, history, and theories. Students learn techniques and process in 2D, stop-motion, and digital animation. Projects teach students the workflow of animating including script development, storyboarding, frame-by-frame animation, animatic, digital, and post-production. Students are required to research artists, both historical and contemporary, working in the field of animation and to be able to discuss the work. The course teaches theoretical and historical perspectives on animation and requires students to develop a critical analysis and vocabulary. (Formerly Introduction to 2D Animation).

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three courses from: ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 106C Stop Motion Animation

Introduction to imagining, producing, and creating stop motion animations. Includes hands-on work in storyboarding, drawing and paper-based animation, pixalization, animation of everyday objects, and Claymation with basic characters and sets. Historical and contemporary animations will be viewed in class to inspire animation ideas, aesthetics, and practices. Students are billed a materials fee. (Formerly Introduction to Stop Motion Animation.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Elliot Anderson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three courses from: ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26; or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

ART 106E 3D Modeling and Animation

Independent and collaborative creative projects using advanced computer methods. May include networking projects, virtual representations, interactive multimedia, installation, performance, 3D modeling and animation, or robotics. Emphasis on advanced critical and experimental approaches to computers as a unique art medium, and contemporary research issues. Students are required to enroll in scheduled lab section. Students are billed for a materials fee. (Formerly Introduction to 3D Modeling and Animation.).

Credits

5

Instructor

Elliot Anderson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three courses from: ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26; or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 106O 2D Animation

This project-centered studio course introduces 2D animation concepts, history, techniques and contemporary practices, production strategies, processes, and tools from a practical approach rooted in a historical/theoretical context. During each project's development, students research artists working within relevant categories and/or topics of animation, presenting findings to assist in their creative process.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kristen Gillette

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Summer

ART 108 New Media and Social Practice Artmaking

Provides students with firsthand experience developing new media artworks in relationship to the needs of specific communities and social struggles. Students develop content using new media practices, tools, systems, and strategies. The final artwork can utilize video, film, digital media, social networks, and app development, among other new media art forms. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Elliot Anderson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three courses from: ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26; or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

ART 110 Intermediate/Advanced Drawing

Work moves toward individual directions in drawing. A variety of media are explored. Each student is expected to do 150 hours of drawing over the quarter. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Gwyn

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20J, ART 20L, ART 111, ART 112, ART 119; and two from ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20K, ART 26; or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 111 Figure Drawing

Focuses on drawing from the human figure and exploring the figure for the purpose of personal expression and social communication. Intended for the intermediate/advanced drawing student. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20J, ART 20L, ART 110, ART ART 112, ART 119; and two from ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20K, ART 26; or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 112 Mixed Media Works on Paper

This course stresses alternative drawing processes, techniques, and materials. Intended for the intermediate or advanced student. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Gwyn

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20J, ART 20L, ART 110, ART 111, 119; and two from ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20K, ART 26; or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 113 Illustrating Stories: Fantasy and Documentary Narratives

This drawing/painting class is taught using New Yorker magazine covers as examples of illustration at a level of excellence that is accessible and which are examined for content and formal qualities. Work is done in drawing and painting media; some digital and mixed media may be incorporated. Painting will be water-based. Wit, humor, restraint, and sophistication are discussed, as well as inclusivity, exclusivity, and explicit and implicit social issues.

Credits

5

Instructor

Frank Galuszka

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Summer

ART 119 Special Topics in Drawing

Special topics in drawing as announced. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

F. Galuszka

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20J, ART 20L, ART 110, ART ART 111, ART 112; and two from ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20K, ART 26; or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 120 Intermedia

Explorations of the role of an artist as someone who integrates a variety of media to explore conscious subject matter. Emphasis on contemporary art forms that incorporate scores, mapping, found objects, time-based elements, and interactivity. Students are billed a materials fee. (Formerly Introduction to Intermedia.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Elizabeth Stephens

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course from Art 20H, ART 121, ART 122, ART 124, ART 125, ART 129, ART 172, ART 180B, ART 183, ART 188, ART 189; and two non-sculpture/intermedia/ public art lower-division studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 121 Intermedia II

Investigation in combining media, materials, and forms to explore a variety of contemporary art practices. Students develop their projects thematically throughout the quarter. Assignments encourage experimentation with time and motion, text and images, collaboration, installation, performance, and interactivity. Discussions, reading handouts, and critiques further the development of perceptual and conceptual skills. Skill workshops introduce new techniques. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ART120. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-C

ART 122 Intermedia: Conceptual and Process-Oriented Approaches

Special subjects to be offered by regular staff or visiting artists as announced. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course from ART 20H, ART 120, ART 121, ART 124, ART 125, ART 129, ART 172, ART 180B, ART 183, ART 188, ART 189; and two non-sculpture/intermedia/ public art lower-division studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 124 Material Metaphor: Creating Meaning in Form

Workshops introduce further investigation of materials and techniques. Students explore diverse methods of visual communication through a series of projects that require individual research and collaborative efforts. Students are encouraged to develop projects according to their motivation, expertise, and self-assessment. Emphasis placed on contemporary studio practices of installation, students will integrate a variety of materials and metaphor within the architectural and environmental space. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Elizabeth Stephens

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course from ART 20H, ART 120 ART 121, ART 122, ART 125, ART 129, ART 172, ART 180B, ART 183, ART 188, ART 189; and two non-sculpture/intermedia/ public art lower-division studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 125 Environmental Art Studio

Introduces students to environmental art and design through basic concepts, techniques, and studio practice. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

E. Shanken

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

ART 127 Architectural Design

Introduction to the fundamentals of architectural design. To convey their concepts clearly, students are introduced to visual representation techniques, including orthographic projections and paraline drawing. Students are also introduced to representation techniques of abstraction and perception, including diagramming and mapping. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course from ART 20H, ART 120, ART 121, ART 122, ART 124, ART 125, ART 129, ART 172, ART 180B, ART 183, ART 188, ART 189; and two non-sculpture/intermedia/ public art lower-division studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 128 Picturing Identity: Document and Culture

Studio addresses issues of race, gender, culture, personal identity, and visual representation. Examines ways ideas of identity are given visual form and communicated in fine arts and mass media. Students research ways traditionally underrepresented groups in society have been and are being represented in mass media; they then visually interpret that information in forms of visual artifacts. This process and interpretation serve as springboard to examination of expanded ideas of identity, including personal and/or family culture and history, gender, and ethnicity. Encourages use of broad range of mediums available to construct visual representations of identity. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three courses from: ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

ART 129 Special Topics in Intermedia

Exploring interactive strategies for making art. Projects experiment with combining forms and mediums to engage an audience. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Elizabeth Stephens

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course from ART 20H, ART 120, ART 121, ART 122, ART 124, ART 125, ART 172, ART 180B, ART 183, ART 188, ART 189; and two non-sculpture/intermedia/ public art lower-division studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 130 Intermediate/Advanced Painting

Continuation of the development of a basic foundation in painting with emphasis on the development of individual, experimental procedures. A foundation in drawing is recommended. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Gwyn

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One from ART 20J, ART 133, ART 137, ART 138, ART 139; and two non-painting lower-division studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. A foundation in drawing is recommended. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

ART 132 Figure Painting

Students learn the classical practice of painting the nude figure from life using traditional oil painting techniques. Students study short poses, limited color, and graduate to long pose, full color. Students are billed a materials fee. (Formerly course 102A.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Noah Buchanan

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Summer

ART 133 Abstract Painting

Exploration of abstract painting through studio work, lectures, and critiques with emphasis on progressive abstraction, minimalism, op art, and abstract expressionism as well as other 20th-century and 21st-century forms. A foundation in drawing is recommended. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

T. Craighead

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One from ART 20J, ART 20L, ART 130, ART 137, ART 138, ART 139; and two non-painting lower-division studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20K, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

ART 137 Outdoor Painter's Project

Explores contemporary landscape through the practice of plein air painting. Observational plein air painting will provides the foundation for the class. Instruction includes technical instruction in materials and technique as well as conceptual material. Student may work with oils, alkyds, or acrylic on panels, paper, or canvas.

Credits

5

Instructor

Peter Loftus

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One from ART 20J, ART 130, ART 133, ART 138, ART 139; and two non-painting lower-division studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

ART 138 Facture and Meaning

Explores the materials and history of painting through lectures, demonstrations, and practice in oils, egg tempera, distemper, and Flashe paint. Students participate in group practices and also work independently on projects designed by them in consultation with the instructor. A foundation in drawing is recommended. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Gwyn

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One from ART 20J, ART 130, ART 133, ART 137, ART 139; and two non-painting lower-division studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

ART 139 Special Topics in Painting

Special studies in painting as announced. A foundation in drawing is recommended. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Melissa Gwyn

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One from ART 20J, ART 130, ART 133, ART 137, ART 138; and two non-painting lower-division studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 150 Darkroom Practices

Students concentrate on darkroom practices and explore visual ideas, directing their work toward individualized goals. Required work includes making photographic prints, reading historical and theoretical works, and examination of photographs. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

N. Locks, Karolina Karlic

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ART 20I and two non-photography lower-division art studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Spring

ART 152C View Camera Photography

Explores the processes, materials, and techniques of large-format photography. Students learn the concepts and theories related to the view camera. Emphasizes advanced understanding of negative exposure, sheet-film processing, tonal-range manipulation, digital scanning, and large-format output. Contemporary issues and concepts explored.

Credits

5

Instructor

Karolina Karlic

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Summer

ART 153 Still to Moving: Topics in Cinematography for Artists

The natural evolution from still image making to motion picture image making is at the heart of this course as students look at this evolution from a historical, social, conceptual, and technical perspective. Artists who have been primarily working in still photography will learn to transition to visual storytelling through the lens of cinematography by addressing the technical requirements necessary to create motion pictures. Advanced discussions on film and digital formats, quality and quantity of light, exposure, composition, movement, camera support systems, and coverage for post-production will be explored through a combination of screenings, assignments, and readings. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Y. Harris

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ART 20I; and two courses from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Plus one course from ART 150 or ART 156. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 154A Being Social: Photography & Engagement

Explores historical and contemporary ways in which photography has been used to examine social issues and invites students to produce work that responds to issues that are important to them. We will learn about photograph's historical significance in raising social awareness, analyzing the aesthetic and methodological strategies of modern and contemporary photographers seeking to catalyze economic, political and cultural change through the production of images. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Karolina Karlic

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ART 20I and ART 156; and two courses from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 155 Photo Field Research Quarter (PFRQ): California Road Trip

Offers students the unique opportunity to live and learn and photograph outside the classroom, actively engaging locations across the state of California. Students will cover 2400 miles from Northern Mendocino County to the Salton Sea, Eastern Sierra, Death Valley, and Big Sur. Class exposes students to cultural, historical, and environmental issues facing California. Due to the rigor of the course, students must submit an application demonstrating the commitment and photo preparation necessary for successful completion of the class. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

10

Instructor

John Chapman

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Summer

ART 156 Project Development in Photography

Concentrates on photographic project development, developing analytical skills designed to help direct students' own photographic ideas. Helps students create a conceptual theoretical framework through image-making in the field and studio, through critique and discussion, through readings, and by studying the work of artists. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

K. Perry

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course from ART 20I; and two non-photography lower-division art studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter

ART 158 Advanced Photography

Students produce a portfolio of photographs, read historical and theoretical works, and study photographs and other art works. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

N. Locks

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ART 156; and one course from ART 150, ART 151, or ART 159. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

ART 159 Special Topics in Photography

Special studies in photography, concentrating on specific subject matter or media. Topics may include documentary photography, landscape, alternative processes, or mixed media. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

K. Perry

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ART 150 or ART 156. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

ART 160B Mono/Mixed Media Printmaking

Introduces the contemporary monotype, monoprint, and mixed media print processes facilitating a crossover between painting, drawing, and printmaking. Through lectures, demonstrations, and discussions on topics and class assignments, students will expand their creative possibilities in this exciting medium. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jimin Lee

Requirements

Prerequisites: ART 20G or ART 26 and two non-print lower-division media studios from ART 15, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 161B Relief/Mixed Media Printmaking

Explores traditional, contemporary, and experimental processes, issues, and concepts of relief and mono/mixed media printmaking. Students gain in-depth information and working knowledge to specialize individual ideas and build artistic development through varieties of class activities.

Credits

5

Instructor

J. Lee

Requirements

Prerequisites: ART 20G or ART 26 and two non-print lower-division media studios from ART 15, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 161C Tradition and Innovation: Relief Printmaking in Korea

Explores the history of printing from the world's oldest printed text developed in Korea to the latest cutting-edge technology, including laser cutting. Students study many aspects of both traditional and contemporary relief (woodblock) printmaking, both materials, tools, and techniques and the issues, concepts and history of the field. Through various class activities, field trips and cultural visits (to UNESCO World Heritage Sites) in Korea, students will be exposed to diverse and multi-regional art practices that will broaden their perspectives and increase their understanding not only in the fields of print media but in the larger contemporary visual culture.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Summer

ART 162A Intaglio I

Introduces students to various methods used in making intaglio prints. Encourages individual artistic growth of imagery and technique through assignments designed to explore the medium. Includes discussion and critique of work with equal emphasis on technique and concept. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jimin Lee

Requirements

Prerequisites: ART 20G or ART 26 and two non-print lower-division media studios from ART 15, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

ART 162B Intaglio II

This presentation of advanced intaglio techniques emphasizes a variety of multi-plate color printing and photo etching processes. The course concentrates on individual development in style and concept through the intaglio process. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jimin Lee

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ART 162A. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 163A Lithography I

Introduction to drawing, processing, and printing of lithographs from stone. Emphasis on discovery of tonal, textural, and expressive potential from the surface of the stone, while establishing individual directions in imagery. Condensed history of the medium, technical theory, and critique in lecture and demonstrations. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Enrique Martinez Leal

Requirements

Prerequisites: ART 20G or ART 26 and two non-print lower-division media studios from ART 15, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

ART 163B Lithography II

Continuation of course 163A. Introduction of tusche wash, aluminum plates, transfers, photo-lithography (computer interface), and multiple color techniques. Emphasis on experimentation, refinement of craft and approach, defining individual imagery, and expanding scale. Further investigation of the history of the medium and contemporary practice. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Enrique Martinez Leal

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ART 163A. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 163C Magnified Imagination: A Printmaking Approach

Examines the wonders of visual magnification of the natural world by using enlargement lenses, scanner, and microscopes to create photo-based and autographic prints that enhance strange and unperceived realities. Visits to the UCSC Norris Center for Natural History, Thimann's Roof Garden and Greenhouse will provide opportunities to explore natural world specimens for projects. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

E. Martinez

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ART 20G and two courses from ART 15, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 164A Screenprinting

Introduces water-based screen printing. Students are introduced to processes including basic equipment, printing techniques, printing papers, stenciling processes, and photographic and digital techniques. Emphasis is on continued development of content and aesthetic awareness through the possibilities of screen printing. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Enrique Martinez Leal

Requirements

Prerequisites: ART 20G or ART 26 and two non-print lower-division media studios from ART 15, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

ART 164S Serigraphy in Spain

Introduces water-based screen printing processes including basic equipment, printing techniques, printing papers, stenciling processes, and photographic and digital techniques. Emphasis is on continued development of content and aesthetic awareness through the possibilities of screen printing.

Credits

5

Instructor

E. Martinez-Leal

Quarter offered

Summer

ART 165 Print Media in Visual Communication

Explores a unique approach reviewing the printed images in visual communications. A wide blend of traditional and cutting-edge print media processes with an interdisciplinary focus will be taught for conceptualizing, producing, and presenting the printed image. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jimin Lee

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): one course from ART 160B, ART 161B, ART 161C, ART 162A, ART 162B, ART 163A, ART 163B, ART 163C, ART 164A, ART 164S, ART 168, ART 169. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 166 Art of Bookmaking

Introduction to production of small edition books and multiples utilizing sequential visual imaging, narrative content, and mixed media in bookmaking. Provides instruction in conceptualizing, producing, and distributing printed artists' multiples. Ideas encouraged within a broad range of possibilities via the format of artists' books. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kathleen Perry

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three courses from: ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26 or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 168 Photo-Based Printmaking

Intermediate/advanced studio course exploring the processes, history, and the recent developments in contemporary photomechanical printmaking. Through experimentation and research students learn how to utilize photographic imagery, blending them in multiple layers and colors, thereby facilitating articulation of their conceptual foundations. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jimin Lee

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three courses from the following: ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 169 Special Topics in Printmaking

Special studies in printmaking, as announced. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisites: ART 20G or ART 26 and two non-print lower-division media studios from ART 15, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

ART 172 Public Art: Memory, Landscape, and Artist as Activist

In-depth exploration of art in the public sphere. Students build an understanding of public art sparked by practical experience designing and developing projects. Theoretical aspects of contemporary public art, and an introduction to the range of current public art practices will be introduced through readings, lectures, and artist's talks. The combination of practical hands-on technique and theoretical ideology will enable students to fully develop their own project within the class. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

J. Leanos

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 175 Taking Art to the Streets

Expands traditional definitions of art making taking art beyond the museum. Students take art making to the streets. We explore art making in the public sphere from murals to graffiti, street art to shop dropping, protests to public commissioned projects and community engaged interventions.

Credits

5

Instructor

K. McKinley

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three courses from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26, or by consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Fall

ART 180B Sculpture II

More advanced fabrication techniques in sculpture using wood, metal, industrial, and other materials. Techniques include carpentry and woodshop skills, and an introduction to sculptural forms, processes, and ideas. Demonstrations, slide lectures, and critical discussion of work help develop technical and conceptual skills. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

J. Parker

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course from ART 20H, ART 120, ART 121, ART 122, ART 124, ART 125, ART 129, ART 172, ART 183, ART 188, or ART 189; and two non-sculpture/intermedia/public art lower-division studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

ART 181 Art, Power & Politics

Explores strategies artists use to engage political subject matter in the 21st century. Students create their own projects, research and test approaches, techniques and strategies learning from the ways national and international artists encode and convey information in creating political work. Methods range from community collaboration; to tactical culture jamming, participatory collaborative projects, activism and intervention, symbolic and gestural work, artist-led projects, performances and community projects. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

W. Hibbert-Jones

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): three courses from: ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 182 Materiality of Color

A research-based, studio art class in which students experiment with ideas and processes, and pursue projects exploring the materiality of color, including social and cultural effects and environmental implications. Following a sequence of short assignments paired with class critiques, students design and complete their own research-based art projects (in any media) that investigate color as a material phenomenon. Class discussions address physical, perceptual, psychological, geological, biological, cultural, social, political, philosophical and aesthetic aspects of color in concert with readings, guest lectures, field trips, technical demonstrations and visual presentations. Students harvest, make, and use dyes from plant materials grown at the UCSC Farm, and contribute to the ongoing development of a dye garden on campus. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

L. Palmer

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three courses from: ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20H, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Spring

ART 183 Metal Fabrication

Focus on teaching intermediate to advanced students the processes and techniques of direct metal fabrication for contemporary sculpture and design. Explores a range of welding, cutting, and forming techniques and processes through demonstrations, slide lectures, field trips, and studio time. Demonstrations, slide lectures, and critical discussion of work help develop technical and conceptual skills. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

J. Parker

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course from ART 20H, ART 120, ART 121, ART 122, ART 124, ART 125, ART 129, ART 172, ART 180B, ART 188, ART 189; and two non-sculpture/intermedia/public art lower-division studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20I,ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

ART 184 3D Art and Design: Laser Cutting and CNC Routing

Emphasizes the conceptual aspects of 3D art and design using the laser cutter to prototype and experiment with construction methods and materials to create, represent, respond to, and reflect on 3D forms in space. Students learn about mixed-media fabrication techniques, materials, and processes that include using a woodshop and metal-fabrication shop. The course is structured around assignments that develop individual expressiveness, research skills, creative industry, and class participation. Students are billed a materials fee. (Formerly 3D Art and Design Studio 1.)

Credits

5

Instructor

K. Gillette

Requirements

One course from ART 20H, ART 20K, ART 101, ART 102, ART 103, ART 107, ART 108, ART120, ART 121, ART 122, ART 124, ART 125, ART 129, ART 146T, ART 172, ART 180B, ART 183,ART 188, ART 189 and two courses from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

ART 185 3D Art and Design: Printing and Prototyping

Expands 3D art and design principles, methodologies, process, and skills via structured projects using 3D printers and modeling. The metal-fabrication shop and the woodshop allow students to prototype and experiment with construction methods and materials used to develop assignments. The course is structured around assignments that develop critical thinking, individual industry, research skills, creative expressiveness, and class participation. Students are billed a materials fee. (Formerly 3D Art and Design Studio 2.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Jennifer Parker

Requirements

One course from ART 20H, ART 20K, ART 101, ART 102, ART 103, ART 107, ART 108, ART 180B, ART 183, ART 184, ART 188; and two courses from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 188 Intermediate to Advanced Sculpture (Foundry)

This intermediate/advanced course provides the information and facilities necessary to express ideas through the indirect process of metal casting. The lost wax method is used to manifest ideas in sculpture. Lectures and demonstrations are combined with work time in class. Students generate sculpture forms in wax then gate, invest, weld, chase, patina, and present at least one finished piece. Students are billed a materials fee. May be repeated for credit.

Credits

5

Instructor

S. Monaghan

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course from ART 20H, ART 120,ART 121, ART 122, ART 124, ART ART 125, ART 129, ART 172, ART 180B, ART 183, ART 189; and two non-sculpture/intermedia/public art lower-division studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Spring

ART 189 Special Topics in Sculpture

Special topics in sculpture as announced, concentrating on specific aspects of subject matter and media. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Wendy Hibbert-Jones, Laurie Palmer

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course from ART 20H, ART 120, ART 121, ART 122, ART 124, ART 125, ART 129, ART 179, ART 180B, ART 183, ART 188; and two non-sculpture/intermedia/public art lower-division studios from ART 15, ART 20G, ART 20I, ART 20J, ART 20K, ART 20L, ART 26. Enrollment is restricted to art majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 190A Writing for Artists

Provides practice in using writing as a tool to support creative work--to generate ideas, to critically analyze and interpret artworks, and to communicate clearly with others about one's own work. Lectures, discussions, and visiting artist talks introduce and explore contemporary art contexts, ideas, discourses, artworks, artists, and practices to build students' capacities to place their work in the world. Readings introduce and unfold ideas for discussion, and provide examples of writing formats and purposes as they relate to art practice.

Credits

5

Instructor

Y. Harris

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior art majors.

General Education Code

PE-T

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 190B Senior Project

Advanced senior art majors create and complete a senior project to fulfill their comprehensive graduation requirement. Focuses on a weekly lecture, studio work, peer critique, and professional practices such as the documentation and exhibition of work. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

E. Stephens

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to senior art majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

ART 191 Teaching Apprenticeship

Designed for art majors at the upper-division level. Each student assists in a lower-division art course under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Students assist in technical instruction, critiques, and class discussions. May not be repeated for credit. Does not count toward upper-division major requirements. Enrollment restricted to art majors.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ART 192 Directed Student Teaching

Teaching of a lower-division seminar under faculty supervision. (See course 42.) Students should have upper-division standing with a proposal supported by a faculty member willing to supervise. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ART 193 Field Study

Supervised off-campus study conducted under the immediate and direct guidance of a faculty supervisor. To be used primarily by upper-division students doing part-time off-campus study. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Petitions may be obtained in the Art Department Office.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ART 194 Forms and Ideas

A non-media specific class introducing a range of contemporary visual practices, contexts, issues, forms, and UCSC resources of use to artists, emphasizing relationships between material, form, meaning and between private expression, public communication, and systems of exchange. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Laurie Palmer

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior art majors. Strongly recommended for junior transfer art majors.

Quarter offered

Fall

ART 196 Independent Senior Project

Student will concentrate on completing work for comprehensive exhibition under the direction of his or her art adviser, with help from other faculty as needed. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. (Formerly Senior Project.)

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ART 197 Individual Study

Individual study in areas approved by sponsoring instructors. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

ART 198 Independent Field Study

Provides for department-sponsored independent study programs off campus for which faculty supervision is not in person (e.g., supervision is by correspondence). Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ART 199 Tutorial

Individual study in areas approved by sponsoring instructors. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ART 199F Tutorial

Tutorial

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ART 297 Independent Study

Independent study or research for graduate students. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ARTG 80G Visual Communication and Interaction Design

Survey of the basics of visual communication and interaction design, focusing on communicating designs of interactive systems. Covers techniques from a breadth of visual communication traditions; how to choose, use, and innovate; and how to structure dialogue around them. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Marcelo Viana Neto

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Fall

ARTG 80H Critical History of Digital Games

Surveys the history of digital games from open university games through the home console, PC, and contemporary platforms, and on to indie and art games. Throughout, the course locates connections between technology, marketing, and play culture. (Formerly History of Digital Games.)

Credits

5

General Education Code

PE-T

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter

ARTG 80I Foundations of Play

Understanding the foundations of play through reading influential texts; in-class lectures and activities; designing and playtesting games; and the ethnographies of players in the physical world. Students are billed a materials fee. (Formerly Art 80I.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Elizabeth Swensen, A.M. Darke

General Education Code

PE-H

Quarter offered

Fall, Spring

ARTG 91 Introduction to Game Art Production

Project-centered studio-lecture hybrid course that introduces the process of world-building and interaction design from the standpoint of the art director. Each project addresses a milestone in the art direction development pipeline, and demonstrates corresponding entry-level technical and conceptual skills and strategies. Utilizing this split methodology, the big-picture game development process is presented in tandem with related fundamental digital art and design skills at an achievable scale for an introductory course.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kristen Gillette

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Summer

ARTG 118 Digital Drawing/Painting for Game Design

Supports students working as artists in an interdisciplinary collaboration with project teams led by senior students in computer game design (the yearlong Computer Science 170 series). Instruction includes techniques, tools, and concepts of drawing and painting in a digital environment oriented toward the context of computer games. Coursework is composed of projects to develop individual ideas and skills, as well as offering productively engaged participation in a collaborative game-design team. Enrollment restricted to art and art and design: computer game design majors; admission by permission of the instructor.

Credits

5

Instructor

Eduard Gregor

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ARTG 120 Game Design Experience

Teaches the concrete skills associated with making a digital game, from start to finish. Activities include establishing a team, concepting, storyboarding, prototyping, producing, and testing a game for release. Students are organized into groups and work together to create and produce a playable game. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Elizabeth Swensen

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ARTG 80H or ARTG 80I; and CSE 15 and CSE 15L and CMPM 80K and FILM 80V. Concurrent enrollment in CMPM 120 is required.

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

ARTG 129 Special Topicsin Game Design

Allows students to explore game designs related to their ongoing work within their major in either digital or non-digital formats. Students choose a topic and develop game projects that engage players. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Two of the following courses: ARTG 80G, ARTG 80H, ARTG 80I. Enrollment is restricted to art & design: games and playable media and computer science:computer game design majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ARTG 129A Special Topics in Game Design

Gives students an opportunity to explore game designs related to their ongoing work within the AGPM major, in either digital or analog formats. Students develop projects that engage players on a topic of their choosing.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ARTG 80G, ARTG 80H, and ARTG 80I. Enrollment is restricted to art and design: games and playable media and computer science: games and playable media majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ARTG 131 3D Game Art Production

Studio course in which students learn the highly technical and fundamental skills in the production of 3D art assets for video games. Covers the essential steps in the 3D art pipeline, starting with basic 3D modeling, UV unwrapping, the creation of texture maps, and finally, game engine implementation. Focuses on developing an understanding of the processes and creative thinking necessary to produce industry-level artwork rather than specific software. Students provided with video lectures and demos, and students can expect to produce weekly assignments to practice basic skills and concepts covered.

Credits

5

Instructor

Marcelo Viana Neto

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Summer

ARTG 132 3D Character Rigging and Animation for Video Games

Gives students an in-depth understanding of the techniques of 3D character rigging and animation for video games. Students understand and develop the skills necessary to be an effective technical artist and animator with a focus on industry standard methods for animating characters to be implemented into a game engine. Course provides students with video and written lectures, video demonstrations, assignments and discussion boards aimed at giving them historical understanding of game animation, the evolution of these techniques, hands-on work to become proficient, as well as the ability to communicate online with other students and the instructor to answer questions and further their knowledge.

Credits

5

Instructor

Eduard Gregor

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Summer

ARTG 134 Spectacular Play: Performance, Ritual, and Making a Scene IRL

What do immersion and interactivity look like outside of virtual worlds? How can we activate social dynamics and public space for the purpose of play? How might we evoke feelings of purpose, or even magic, for players and spectators alike? Students will study and create immersive experiences designed to play out in real life. Drawing inspiration from performance studies, activism, art history, and more, we will transform the everyday into the extraordinary.

Credits

5

Requirements

Two of the following courses: ARTG 80G, ARTG 80H, ARTG 80I.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Fall

ARTG 137 Experimental Tabletop RPG Design

Explores experimental mechanics, dynamics, themes, and aesthetics within the tabletop RPG form. In groups and individually, students will play, run, design, write, workshop, and print/produce experimental tabletop RPGs, as well as conduct usability tests focused on layout, design cohesion, and accessibility.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ARTG 80G, ARTG 80H, and ARTG 80I.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

ARTG 145 Non-Digital Game Design

Looks specifically at the design of non-digital games. Surveys a variety of game types and designs. Students prototype card or board game, culminating in a final project that engages players on a socially relevant topic.

Credits

5

ARTG 170 Game Design Studio I

Students create novel, interesting game concepts and outline and polish a game pitch for their yearlong project, starting with concept ideation and storyboarding to prototyping and presenting the game idea. This course is part one of the art and design: games and playable media capstone requirement. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements and ARTG 120 and CMPM 120. Enrollment restricted to senior art and design: games and playable media majors.

Quarter offered

Fall

ARTG 171 Game Design Studio II

Students craft the core loop of their yearlong game project. Students build the game, examine player feedback, and repeat the process to make the game better. This course places particular emphasis on advanced production techniques for working in teams, as well as software engineering practices for software design, software testing, and build management. This course is part two of the art and design, games and playable media capstone requirement.

Credits

7

Instructor

Robin Hunicke

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ARTG 170. Enrollment is restricted to senior art and design: games and playable media majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

ARTG 172 Game Design Studio III

Students scope and polish their final game designs. Students work towards releasing one specific game platform while coordinating across disciplinary boundaries to create and integrate all the necessary code, art, animation, and sound assets for their game. This course is part III of the art and design: games and playable media capstone requirement. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

7

Instructor

Robin Hunicke

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ARTG 171. Enrollment is restricted to senior art and design: games and playable media majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

ARTG 176 Game Design Collaborative

Supports students who are collaborating with the ARTG/CMPM 170-series teams on the creation of their capstone game projects. Enrollment is restricted to students who are working with senior game-design project groups, and by permission of the instructor,

Credits

2

Instructor

The Staff, Robin Hunicke

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring

ARTG 199 Tutorial

Individual study in areas approved by sponsoring instructors. Tutorial may not be used to satisfy major requirements. Petition required, approved by instructor and department; petitions available on the program website.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

ARTG 199F Tutorial

Individual study in areas approved by sponsoring instructors. Tutorial may not be used to satisfy major requirements. Petition required, approved by instructor and department; petitions available on the program website.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

ASTR 1 Introduction to the Cosmos

Overview of the main ideas in our current view of the universe and how these ideas originated. Galaxies, quasars, stars, black holes, and planets. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 2.

Credits

5

Instructor

Puragra Guha Thakurta

General Education Code

SI

Quarter offered

Fall

ASTR 2 Overview of the Universe

An overview of the main ideas in our current view of the universe, and how they originated. Galaxies, quasars, stars, pulsars, and planets. Intended primarily for nonscience majors interested in a one-quarter survey of classical and modern astronomy.

Credits

5

Instructor

A. Leauthaud, M. Bolte

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter

ASTR 3 Introductory Astronomy: Planetary Systems

Properties of the solar system and other planetary systems. Topics include the Sun, solar system exploration, the physical nature of the Earth and the other planets, comets and asteroids, the origin of the solar system, the possibility of life on other worlds, planet formation, and the discovery and characterization of planets beyond the solar system. Intended for nonscience majors. Courses 3, 4, and 5 are independent and may be taken separately or sequentially. (Formerly Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System.)

Credits

5

Instructor

J. Fortney

General Education Code

MF

ASTR 4 Introductory Astronomy: The Stars

Stellar evolution: observed properties of stars, internal structure of stars, stages of a star's life including stellar births, white dwarfs, supernovae, pulsars, neutron stars, and black holes. Planet and constellation identification. Intended for nonscience majors. Courses 3, 4, and 5 are independent and may be taken separately or sequentially.

Credits

5

Instructor

Constance Rockosi

General Education Code

MF

ASTR 5 Introductory Astronomy: The Formation and Evolution of the Universe

The universe explained. Fundamental concepts of modern cosmology (Big Bang, dark matter, curved space, black holes, star and galaxy formation), the basic physics underlying them, and their scientific development. Intended for non-science majors. Courses 3, 4, and 5 are independent and may be taken separately.

Credits

5

Instructor

Michael Bolte, Jean Brodie, Brant Robertson

General Education Code

MF

ASTR 6 The Space-Age Solar System

Scientific study of the Moon, Earth, Mercury, Venus, and Mars by the space program; history of rocket development; the Apollo program and exploration of the Moon; unmanned spacecraft studies of the terrestrial planets; scientific theories of planetary surfaces and atmospheres. Intended for nonscience majors. (Formerly course 80A.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Graeme Smith

General Education Code

SI

Quarter offered

Winter

ASTR 7 Black Holes

Examines the nature of black holes, including their creation and evolution; evidence for their existence from astronomical observations; and the role of black holes in the evolution of the universe. Also examines current ideas about the nature of space, time, and gravity.

Credits

5

General Education Code

MF

ASTR 8 Exploring the Universe with Astronomical Data

Introduces how we use observational data to learn about stars, galaxies, planets, and cosmology. Covers astronomical data and experimental design and basic physics and statistical techniques, such as model fitting, regression, significance tests, and error estimation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Constance Rockosi

General Education Code

SR

Quarter offered

Fall

ASTR 9A Introduction to Research in Physics and Astrophysics

Introduction to research for first-year students interested in physics and astrophysics. Students complete projects in small groups with scientists. Introduces techniques for collaboration; science writing; physics careers. Continuing course spanning two quarters. Enrollment is restricted to first-year proposed astrophysics and physics majors and by permission of the instructor.

Credits

2

Cross Listed Courses

PHYS 9A

Instructor

R. Murray-Clay, J. Fortney

ASTR 9B Introduction to Research in Physics and Astrophysics

Introduction to research for first-year students interested in physics and astrophysics. Students complete projects in small groups with scientists. Introduces techniques for collaboration; science writing; physics careers. Continuing course spanning two quarters. Prerequisite(s): course 9A. Enrollment is restricted to first-year proposed applied physics, physics, and physics (astrophysics) majors and by permission of the instructor.

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

PHYS 9B

General Education Code

PR-E

ASTR 12 Stars and Stellar Evolution

An introduction to the observational facts and physical theory pertaining to stars. Topics include the observed properties of stars and the physics underlying those properties; stellar atmospheres; stellar structure and evolution. Intended for science majors and qualified non-science majors. Knowledge of high school physics and an understanding of mathematics at the Mathematics 2 level required.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ryan Foley

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Spring

ASTR 13 Galaxies, Cosmology, and High Energy Astrophysics

Introduction to modern cosmology and extragalactic astronomy. Topics include the origin of the universe, Big Bang cosmology, expansion of the universe, dark matter and dark energy, properties of galaxies and active galactic nuclei, and very energetic phenomena in our own and other galaxies. Intended for science majors and qualified non-science majors. Knowledge of high school physics and an understanding of mathematics at the Math 2 level required.

Credits

5

General Education Code

MF

ASTR 15 Dead Stars and Black Holes

Course is primarily concerned with the structure, formation, and astrophysical manifestations of compact objects, such as white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes, and the astronomical evidence for their existence. Intended for science majors and qualified non-science majors. Knowledge of high school physics and an understanding of mathematics at the Math 2 level required.

Credits

5

Instructor

Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz

General Education Code

MF

ASTR 16 Astrobiology: Life in the Universe

Topics include the detection of extrasolar planets, planet formation, stellar evolution and properties of Mars, the exploration of our solar system and the search for life within it, and the evolution of life on Earth. Intended for science majors and qualified non-science majors. Knowledge of high school physics and an understanding of mathematics at the Math 2 level required.

Credits

5

Instructor

N. Batalha

General Education Code

MF

ASTR 18 Planets and Planetary Systems

Our solar system and newly discovered planetary systems. Formation and structure of planets, moons, rings, asteroids, comets. Intended for science majors and qualified non-science majors. Knowledge of high school physics and an understanding of mathematics at the Mathematics 2 level required.

Credits

5

General Education Code

MF

ASTR 111 Order-of-Magnitude Astrophysics

Examines the most basic and direct connection between physics and astrophysics in order to derive a better understanding of astrophysical phenomena from first principles to the extent possible.

Credits

5

Instructor

Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MATH 22 or MATH 23A; PHYS 5B or PHYS 6B; and PHYS 101A or previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 102.

Quarter offered

Fall

ASTR 112 Physics of Stars

The leading observational facts about stars as interpreted by current theories of stellar structure and evolution. Spectroscopy, abundances of the elements, nucleosynthesis, stellar atmospheres, stellar populations. Final stages of evolution, including white dwarfs, neutron stars, supernovae.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ryan Foley, Jonathan Fortney

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MATH 22 or MATH 23A, PHYS 5B or PHYS 6B, and PHYS 101A or PHYS 102.

Quarter offered

Spring

ASTR 113 Introduction to Cosmology

Physical examination of our evolving universe: the Big Bang model; simple aspects of general relativity; particle physics in the early universe; production of various background radiations; production of elements; tests of geometry of the universe; dark energy and dark matter; and formation and evolution of galaxies and large-scale structure. (Formerly Physical Cosmology.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Piero Madau

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MATH 22 or MATH 23A, PHYS 5B or PHYS 6B, and PHYS 101A or PHYS 102.

Quarter offered

Winter

ASTR 117 High Energy Astrophysics

Theory and practice of space and ground-based x-ray and gamma-ray astronomical detectors. High-energy emission processes, neutron stars, black holes. Observations of x-ray binaries, pulsars, magnetars, clusters, gamma-ray bursts, the x-ray background. High-energy cosmic rays. Neutrino and gravitational-wave astronomy.

Credits

5

Instructor

Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MATH 22 or MATH 23A, PHYS 5B or PHYS 6B, and PHYS 101A or PHYS 102.

ASTR 118 Physics of Planetary Systems

Determination of the physical properties of the solar system, its individual planets, and extrasolar planetary systems through ground-based and space-based observations, laboratory measurements, and theory. Theories of the origin and evolution of planets and planetary systems.

Credits

5

Instructor

N. Batalha

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MATH 22 or MATH 23A; and PHYS 5B or PHYS 6B.

ASTR 119 Introduction to Scientific Computing

Introduction to solving scientific problems using computers. A series of simple problems from Earth sciences, physics, and astronomy are solved using a user-friendly scientific programming language (Python/SciPy).

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MATH 11A or MATH 19A or MATH 20A or AM 15A.

Quarter offered

Fall, Spring

ASTR 136 Advanced Astronomy Laboratory

Introduces the techniques of modern observational astrophysics at optical wavelengths through hands-on experiments and use of remote observatories. Students develop the skills and experience to pursue original research. Course is time-intensive and research-oriented. (Formerly Physics 136.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): EART 119 and PHYS 133. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior astrophysics majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

ASTR 192 Dir Stu Teach

Dir Stu Teach

Credits

5

ASTR 199 Tutorial

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ASTR 202 Astrophysics I

Survey of radiative processes of astrophysical importance from radio waves to gamma rays. The interaction of radiation with matter: radiative transfer, emission, and absorption. Thermal and non-thermal processes, including bremsstrahlung, synchrotron radiation, and Compton scattering. Radiation in plasmas. (Formerly Relative Processes.)

Credits

5

Instructor

B. Robertson

ASTR 204 Astrophysics II

Explores how physical conditions in astrophysical objects can be diagnosed from their spectra. Discussion topics include how energy flows determine the thermal state of radiating objects and how the physics of radiative transfer can explain the emergent spectral characteristics of stars, accretion disks, Lyman-alpha clouds, and microwave background. (Formerly Astrophysical Flows.)

Credits

5

Instructor

R. Murray-Clay

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ASTR 205 Introduction to Astronomical Research and Teaching

Lectures and seminar-style course intended to integrate new graduate students into the department; to introduce students to the research and interests of department faculty; and to expose graduate students to teaching skills and classroom techniques. (Formerly Introduction to Astronomical Research.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Graeme Smith

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

ASTR 214 Special Topics in Galactic and Extragalactic Astronomy

Survey of some principal areas of research on the origin and growth of cosmic structures and galaxies: the dark ages; 21cm tomography; first galaxies; first stars and seed black holes; reionization and chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium; the assembly of massive galaxies; quasi-stellar sources; interactions of massive black holes with their environment; extragalactic background radiation; numerical simulations and the nature of the dark matter; the dark halo of the Milky Way. (Formerly Special Topics in Cosmology)

Credits

5

Instructor

A. Leauthaud

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ASTR 220A Stars and Planets I

Survey of stellar structure and evolution.Physical properties of stellar material. Convective and radiative energy transport. Stellar models and evolutionary tracks through all phases. Brown dwarfs and giant planets. Comparison with observations. (Formerly Stellar Structure and Evolution.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ASTR 222 Stars and Planets II

Theory and observations of protoplanetary disks. Origin and evolution of the solar nebula. Formation and evolution of the terrestrial planets and the giant planets. (Formerly Planetary Formation and Evolution.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ASTR 225 High-Energy Astrophysics

High-energy astrophysics and the final stages of stellar evolution: supernovae, binary stars, accretion disks, pulsars; extragalactic radio sources; active galactic nuclei; black holes. (Formerly Physics of Compact Objects)

Credits

5

Instructor

Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz

ASTR 230 Diffuse Matter in Space

Fundamental physical theory of gaseous nebulae and the interstellar medium. Ionization, thermal balance, theory and observation of emission spectra. Interstellar absorption lines, extinction by interstellar dust. Ultraviolet, optical, infrared, and radio spectra of gaseous nebulae.

Credits

5

Instructor

P. Madau

Quarter offered

Spring

ASTR 233 Galaxies and Cosmology I

Survey of modern physical cosmology, including Newtonian cosmology, curved space-times, observational tests of cosmology, the early universe, inflation, nucleosynthesis, dark matter, and the formation of structure in the universe. (Formerly Physical Cosmology.)

Credits

5

Instructor

K. Bundy

Quarter offered

Winter

ASTR 234 Statistical Techniques in Astronomy

Introduces probability and statistics in data analysis with emphasis on astronomical applications. Topics include probability, Bayes' theorem, statistics, error analysis, correlation, hypothesis testing, parameter estimation, surveys, time-series analysis, surface distributions, and image processing. Students learn to identify the appropriate statistical technique to apply to an astronomical problem and develop a portfolio of analytic and computational techniques that they can apply to their own research.

Credits

5

Instructor

Andrew Skemer

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ASTR 240A Galaxies and Cosmology II

Structure and evolutionary histories of nearby galaxies. Stellar populations, galactic dynamics, dark matter, galactic structure and mass distributions. Peculiar galaxies and starbursting galaxies. Structure and content of the Milky Way. Evolution of density perturbations in the early universe. Hierarchical clustering model for galaxy formation and evolution. (Formerly Galactic and Extragalactic Stellar Systems.)

Credits

5

ASTR 257 Observational Astronomy

Covers physical, mathematical, and practical methods of modern astronomical observations at all wavelengths at a level that prepares students to comprehend published data and to plan their own observations. Topics include: noise sources and astrophysical backgrounds; coordinate systems; filter systems; the physical basis of coherent and incoherent photon detectors; astronomical optics and aberrations; design and use of imaging and spectroscopic instruments; antenna theory; aperture synthesis and image reconstruction techniques; and further topics at the discretion of the instructor. Familiarity with UNIX, computer programming, and completion of Physics 116C is strongly recommended as well as at least one upper-division course in astronomy. (Formerly Modern Astronomical Techniques.)

Credits

5

Instructor

A. Skemer

Requirements

Designed for graduate students; available to qualified undergraduate astrophysics majors by instructor permission.

ASTR 260 Instrumentation for Astronomy

An introduction to astronomical instrumentation for infrared and visible wavelengths. Topics include instrument requirements imposed by dust, atmosphere, and telescope; optical, mechanical, and structural design principles and components; electronic and software instrument control. Imaging cameras and spectrographs are described. Offered in alternate academic years.

Credits

5

Instructor

Constance Rockosi

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ASTR 289 Adaptive Optics and Its Application

Introduction to adaptive optics and its astronomical applications. Topics include effects of atmospheric turbulence on astronomical images, basic principles of feedback control, wavefront sensors and correctors, laser guide stars, how to analyze and optimize performance of adaptive optics systems, and techniques for utilizing current and future systems for astronomical observations.

Credits

5

Instructor

Claire Max

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ASTR 292 Seminar

Seminar attended by faculty, graduate students, and upper-division undergraduate students.

Credits

0

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ASTR 293 Current Literature in Astrophysics

Training for following daily progress in astrophysical research to keep pace with the rapidly evolving scientific field. Students learn how to select and read interesting papers (that span a wide range of topics) efficiently and how to summarize their key results. Students have an opportunity to practice presentation skills in an informal group discussion setting.

Credits

2

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduatestudents.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ASTR 297A Independent Study

Independent study or research for graduate students who have not yet begun work on their theses. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ASTR 297B Independent Study

Independent study or research for graduate students who have not yet begun work on their theses. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ASTR 297C Independent Study

Independent study or research for graduate students who have not yet begun work on their theses. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ASTR 299A Thesis Research

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ASTR 299B Thesis Research

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ASTR 299C Thesis Research

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOC 100A Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Fundamentals of molecular biology, structure and function of nucleic acids, and protein structure. Designed for students preparing for research careers in biochemistry and molecular biology. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; discussion: 1-1/4 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Michael Stone

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 8B; and BIOL 20A.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOC 100B Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Covers principles of protein function from ligand binding and enzyme mechanism, kinetics and regulation to membrane composition and membrane protein function. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; discussion: 1-1/4 hours. (Formerly Biochemistry .)

Credits

5

Instructor

Carrie Partch

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOC 100A

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOC 100C Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Biochemistry: intermediary metabolism and bioenergetics. How enzymatically catalyzed reactions are organized and regulated; how energy from molecules is extracted for chemical work. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; discussion: 1-1/4 hours. (Formerly Biochemistry .)

Credits

5

Instructor

H. Boeger

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOC 100B

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOC 110L Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory

An introduction to the major techniques used in the isolation and characterization of biological components. Laboratory: 8 hours; lecture: 1-3/4 hours. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Olof Einarsdottir

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOC 100B and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to chemistry majors in the biochemistry concentration. Other majors by permission.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 19 Biodiversity in the Age of Humans

How can we better understand how humans have affected Earth and its inhabitants? Explores how DNA shed by organisms into the environment can be collected and used to study Earth's biodiversity, with applications in medicine, anthropology, agriculture, and conservation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Beth Shapiro

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to first-year students, sophomores, and juniors.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 20B Development and Physiology

Topics in morphology, physiology, development, genetics, and endocrinology selected to exemplify current issues and perspectives in organismic biology.

Credits

5

Instructor

Robin Dunkin

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOE 20C Ecology and Evolution

Introduction to ecology and evolution covering principles of evolution at the molecular, organismal, and population levels. Evolutionary topics include genetic and phenotypic variation, natural selection, adaptation, speciation, and macroevolution. Also covers behavioral, population, and community ecology including applied ecological issues.

Credits

5

Instructor

Baldo Marinovic

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOE 75 Scientific Diving Certification

Prerequisite for course 161/L, Kelp Forest Ecology, and all research diving performed under the auspices of UCSC or other academic institutions. Course work includes lectures and scuba diving. Topics include subtidal sampling techniques, navigation, low visibility diving, search and recovery, rescues, small boat use, oxygen administration for divers, technical blue water deep diving, physics, and physiology. Apply online at http://www2.ucsc.edu/sci-diving. Students are billed a course materials fee that covers costs for equipment use, materials, and transportation. Prerequisite(s): skill level equal to Advanced Scuba Diver Certification, pass scuba physical, provide own scuba gear, be certified in CPR and First Aid; and interview: pass swim test and scuba skills test.

Credits

2

Instructor

Stephen Clabuesch

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 80S Lies, Damn Lies, and Statistics

Probability and statistics underlie much of our everyday experience and, as such, there is a fundamental need for an understanding of the use, and misuse, of statistics. This course is taught through case studies based in biology, politics, economics, crime, education, disease, conservation, and other fields of interest. For example, does a change in crime rate really affect your probability of being a victim of a crime? The goal is to provide all students with sufficient understanding probability and statistics to determine if everyday and often sensationalistic reporting of statistical results is meaningful.

Credits

5

Instructor

Peter Raimondi

General Education Code

SR

BIOE 82 Introduction to Field Research and Conservation

A field-based course with overnight and day trips to regionally diverse areas throughout Central California. Field trips and lectures familiarize students with a wide variety of topics in the ecological, conservation, and environmental science as well as natural-resource management. Enrollment is by instructor permission. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 85 Natural History of the UCSC Natural Reserves

Lectures and field trips familiarize students with the flora and fauna of the UCSC Natural Reserves. Field trips focus on surveying and identifying vertebrates and plants at each UCSC Natural Reserve (Fort Ord, Campus Reserve, Big Creek, Younger Lagoon, and Ano Nuevo).

Credits

5

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 95 Seymour Center Docent Training

Taught as a series of seminars, course provides a survey of marine sciences and the role of scientific research in understanding and conserving the world's oceans. Topics include: marine biology, ecology, conservation, coastal geology, and climate change. This series is intended to prepare students to interpret research and inform the public by leading tours at the Seymour Marine Discovery Center at the Long Marine Lab. Enrollment is by application and interview.

Credits

2

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 99 Tutorial

Individual, directed study for undergraduates. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOE 107 Ecology

Focuses on physiological, behavioral, and population ecology, and on linking ecological processes to evolution. It includes basic principles, experimental approaches, concepts of modeling, and applications to ecological problems.

Credits

5

Instructor

Laurel Fox, Bruce Lyon, Auston Kilpatrick

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOE 108 Marine Ecology

Paradigms and designs in marine ecology. A review of the paradigms that have shaped our understanding of marine ecology; analysis and discussion of experiments with these paradigms. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 208.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kristy Kroeker, Mark Carr

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C; BIOE 107 or BIOE 140 recommended. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 109 Evolution

An examination of the history and mechanisms of evolutionary change. Topics include molecular evolution, natural and sexual selection, adaptation, speciation, biogeography, and macroevolution.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kathleen Kay, Giacomo Bernardi, Grant Pogson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C, and BIOL 105.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOE 112 Ornithology

Introduction to the evolution, ecology, behavior, and natural history of birds, using exemplary case histories to illustrate key concepts in evolution, ecology, and behavior.

Credits

5

Instructor

Bruce Lyon

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOE 107, BIOE 109, or BIOE 140. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 112L is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 112L Ornithology Field Studies

Field trips introduce students to field identification skills and field investigation of census, foraging behavior, migration, social behavior, and communication. Examination of specimens in the laboratory will be used to highlight the diversity and taxonomy of birds. Students are billed a materials fee. Some field trips may require students to provide their own transportation.

Credits

2

Instructor

Bruce Lyon

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOE 107, BIOE 109, or BIOE 140. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 112 is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 114 Herpetology

Lectures introduce students to evolution, development, physiology, behavior, ecology, and life history of reptiles and amphibians. The materials integrate with conceptual and theoretical issues of ecology, evolution, physiology, and behavior.

Credits

5

Instructor

Barry Sinervo

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; BIOE 107, BIOE 109, BIOE 110, or BIOE 140. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 114L is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 114L Field Methods in Herpetological Research

Field trips introduce students to natural history, censusing techniques, physiological ecology, and behavioral analysis of reptiles and amphibians. Laboratories introduce students to techniques for analyzing behavior and physiology. Field studies culminate with a group project in a natural setting. Some field trips may be held on weekends due to weather considerations. Some field trips may require students to provide their own transportation, some transportation will be provided by UCSC. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Barry Sinervo

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; BIOE 107, BIOE 109, BIOE 110, or BIOE 140. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 114 is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 117 Systematic Botany of Flowering Plants

An examination of the taxonomy and evolution of flowering plants. Special topics include phylogenetics and cladistics, plant species concepts, and modern methods of systematic research.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kathleen Kay

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Must be taken concurrently with BIOE 117L.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 117L Systematic Botany of Flowering Plants Laboratory

Weekly laboratory concerned primarily with California flora and plant families. Several field trips. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Kathleen Kay

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C. Must be taken concurrently with BIOE 117.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 118 Plants and Society: the Biology of Food, Shelter, and Medicine

Introduces plant biology as it affects human society. Topics include the origins of agriculture, the morphology and chemistry of food plants, the material uses of plant products, the biology of medicinal plants, and plant diversity and bioprospecting.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jarmila Pittermann

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C; or ENVS 23 and ENVS 24.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 120 Marine Botany

An introduction to the biology of marine algae, fungi, and angiosperms with regard to form and function. Major boreal, temperate, and tropical marine plant communities. Lecture format.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Must be taken concurrently with BIOE 120L.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 120L Marine Botany Laboratory

One laboratory weekly and several field trips. Focuses on marine algae, fungi, and angiosperms. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Must be taken concurrently with BIOE 120.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 122 Invertebrate Zoology

An examination of invertebrates and their habitats. Lecture format.

Credits

5

Instructor

Baldo Marinovic

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Must be taken concurrently with BIOE 122L.

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

BIOE 122L Invertebrate Zoology Laboratory

An examination of invertebrates and their habitats. Weekly laboratories or field trips. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Baldo Marinovic

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Must be taken concurrently with BIOE 122.

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

BIOE 124 Mammalogy

Introduces the biology of mammals, including their classification, evolution, behavior, reproductive strategies, and general ecology. Examines the diagnostic traits of mammals; provides a survey of the living orders along with their diagnostic features, physiological and behavioral specializations, and adaptations.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 124L is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 124L Mammalogy Laboratory

Focuses on the identification of mammals and their specific traits. Exercises provide hands-on experience at identifying mammal orders, families, and species. Field trip provides students with field techniques in mammalogy.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 124 is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 125 Ecosystems of California

A survey of the diversity, structure, and functioning of California's ecosystems through time and the ways they have influenced and responded to human activities and stewardship. Topics include: ecosystem drivers such as climate, soils, and land-use history; human and ecological prehistory; comparative marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystem dynamics; and managed ecosystems such as range, fisheries, and agriculture.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 125

Instructor

E. Zavaleta

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOE 20C. Enrollment is restricted to ecology and evolution, marine biology, plant sciences, and biology B.A. majors.

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring

BIOE 127 Ichthyology

An introduction to the biology of jawless, cartilaginous, and bony fishes--their classification, evolution, form, physiology, and ecology.

Credits

5

Instructor

Giacomo Bernardi

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Must be taken concurrently with BIOE 127L.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 127L Ichthyology Laboratory

One laboratory session a week and several field trips to study the biology of fish. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Giacomo Bernardi

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Must be taken concurrently with BIOE 127.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 128L Large Marine Vertebrates Field Course

Lectures combined on fieldwork with large marine vertebrates in the laboratory and lectures with large marine vertebrates in the field (Monterey Bay, Ano Nuevo). Fieldwork familiarizes students with research methods, study design, and statistical approaches for research on large marine vertebrates (seals, birds, fish, and sharks). Research includes: animal tracking; physiology; behavior; foraging ecology; and energetics. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Patrick Robinson, Dan Costa

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 129 Biology of Marine Mammals

A survey of cetaceans, pinnipeds, sirenians, and sea otters, including natural history, systematics, physiology, behavior, anatomy, and conservation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dan Costa

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C; and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. BIOL 110 is recommended.

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

BIOE 129L Biology of Marine Mammals Laboratory

Covers the basics of marine mammal taxonomy, anatomy, and field methods with an emphasis on local field identification and understanding of local species. Will include field trips to Long Marine Lab, Ano Nuevo, and Monterey Bay. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Dan Costa

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C. Must be taken concurrently with BIOE 129.

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

BIOE 131 Animal Physiology

Principles and concepts underlying the function of tissues and organ systems in animals with emphasis on vertebrate systems. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOL 130.

Credits

5

Instructor

Terrie Williams, Rita Mehta

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C.

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

BIOE 131L Animal Physiology Laboratory

Experiments conducted with primary focus on quantitative physiological principles of organ systems and intact organisms. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 130L. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Terrie Williams, Rita Mehta

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 131 is required.

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

BIOE 133 Exercise Physiology

An advanced-level course concerning physiological and biochemical processes associated with human performance. Emphasis is on the integration of organ systems for exercise. Topics include metabolism and fuel utilization, cardiovascular and respiratory dynamics during activity, and the effects of training. Requires a good understanding of basic physiological function and anatomy.

Credits

5

Instructor

Terrie Williams

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C. BIOE 131 is recommended. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 133L is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 133L Exercise Physiology Laboratory

An introduction to basic measurement techniques used in assessing the physiological response of humans to exercise. Sessions cover oxygen consumption, respiratory rate, and heart rate monitoring during aerobic and anaerobic activity. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Terrie Williams

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, and BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C. BIOE 131 is recommended. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 133 is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 134 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Course focuses on vertebrate form and function: an integration of physiology and biomechanics. Topics include: the physiology and biomechanics underlying vertebrate locomotion; vertebrate feeding; and the morphological changes associated with different locomotion and feeding strategies through evolutionary time.

Credits

5

Instructor

Rita Mehta

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 134L is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 134L Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Laboratory

Course focuses on the gross dissections all major clades of vertebrates: development, form, and diversity of organ systems and basic principles of evolution; vertebrate classification; and functional morphology, with emphasis on feeding and locomotion. Anatomical dissections integrated with the associated lecture material focusing on biomechanics, form, and function. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Rita Mehta

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 134 is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 135 Plant Physiology

Cellular and organismal functions important in the life of green plants.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jarmila Pittermann

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C; concurrent enrollment in BIOE 135L is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 135L Plant Physiology Laboratory

Weekly laboratory concerning the cellular and organismal functions of green plants. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Jarmila Pittermann

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C; concurrent enrollment in BIOE 135.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 136 Environmental Physiology

Explores how an organism's physiology interacts with its environment including molecular to whole organism-level processes. How do animals thrive in the most diverse regions of Earth and why are some more vulnerable to change than others?

Credits

5

Instructor

Robin Dunkin

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C.

General Education Code

SI

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 137 Molecular Ecology

This combination lecture/laboratory course explores the use of molecular (DNA and/or protein) data in ecological and conservation research. Topics covered include data collection; marker choice; estimating genetic diversity and population structure; the inference of mating systems; and environmental genomics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Beth Shapiro

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C and BIOL 20A and BIOL105, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 137L is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 137L Molecular Ecology Laboratory

This combination lecture/laboratory course explores the use of molecular (DNA and/or protein) data in ecological and conservation research. Topics covered include data collection; marker choice; estimating genetic diversity and population structure; the inference of mating systems; and environmental genomics.

Credits

2

Instructor

Beth Shapiro

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C and BIOL 20A and BIOL105. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 137 is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 140 Behavioral Ecology

An introduction to social and reproductive behavior. Emphasis on studies of vertebrates in their natural habitat. Ideas concerning the evolution of social behavior, mating systems, and individual reproductive strategies. Case histories of well-studied animals that illustrate key principles in courtship and mating, parental behavior, and food-getting behavior.

Credits

5

Instructor

Barry Sinervo

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C.

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

BIOE 141L Behavioral Ecology Field Course

A field-based course introducing students to concepts and methods for studying behavioral ecology in nature. Students will conduct observations and field experiments on various local model organisms including elephant seals, hummingbirds, sparrows, lizards, ants, bees, frogs, and salamanders. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Bruce Lyon, Barry Sinervo

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOE 107 or BIOE 140 or BIOE 110; and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 145 Plant Ecology

An exploration of the ecology of plant form, function, distribution, abundance, and diversity. Topics include plant adaptations to environmental conditions, life history variation, competition, reproductive ecology, herbivory, and patterns of diversity. Lecture with discussions of original papers and independent field project. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 245.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ingrid Parker

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. BIOE 107 is recommended.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 145L Field Methods in Plant Ecology

Hands-on exploration of the concepts and techniques of plant ecology. A combination of lab, greenhouse, and field-based exercises (irrespective of weather conditions). Statistical analysis and scientific writing. One required weekend field trip. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 245L. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ingrid Parker

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 145 is required. BIOE 107 is recommended.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 147 Community Ecology

Develops the major themes of community biology: structure, trophic dynamics, succession, complex interactions among species, herbivory, evolution and coevolution. Uses case histories of well-studied marine and terrestrial systems. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 247.

Credits

5

Instructor

Laurel Fox

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOE 107, BIOE 108, BIOE 145, BIOE 155 or 159A; or ENVS 24 by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 148A Quantitative Ecology

Incorporates building mathematical models and fitting them to data to answer questions in ecology and evolution. Includes learning to write computer code to simulate models and analyze data. Topics include models of population and evolutionary dynamics, and species interactions and behavior. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 248A. Prerequisite(s): course 107 and by permission of instructor.

Credits

5

Instructor

Auston Kilpatrick

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 148B Quantitative Methods in Ecology and Evolution

Advanced methods for building mathematical models and fitting them to data to answer questions in ecology and evolution both mathematically and by writing computer code. Topics include: population dynamics and management, evolutionary and life-history theory, and behavior and game theory. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 248B. Prerequisite(s): mathematical and and programming background. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.

Credits

5

Instructor

Suzanne Alonzo

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 149 Disease Ecology

Focuses on the ecological and evolutionary processes that drive the transmission of pathogens between hosts; the impact of disease on host populations; and what causes the emergence of an infectious disease. Includes theoretical framework, description of field techniques, and discussion of wildlife and human diseases including malaria, West Nile virus, Lyme disease, HIV, avian influenza (bird flu), Chikungunya, tuberculosis, chytridiomycosis, and Ebola.

Credits

5

Instructor

Auston Kilpatrick

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, and BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C and BIOE 107.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 150 Ecological Field Methods

Lectures and laboratory computer exercises designed to familiarize students with research methods, study design, statistical approaches, and analysis tools for ecological research. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Environmental Studies 104A.

Credits

5

Instructor

Donald Croll

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C; concurrent enrollment in BIOE 150L is required. BIOE 107, BIOE 108, BIOE 140, or BIOE 147 recommended.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 150L Ecological Field Methods Laboratory

Field-oriented course in the study of animal ecology and behavior. Combines overview of methodologies and approaches to field research with practical field studies. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Donald Croll

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 150 is required. BIOE 107, BIOE 108, BIOE 140, or BIOE 147 recommended.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 151A Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Ecological Field Methods

An intensive, on-site learning experience in terrestrial field ecology and conservation, using the University of California Natural Reserves and other natural areas. Students study advance concepts in ecology, conservation, and field methods for four weeks, then experience total immersion in field research at the UC Natural Reserves and other natural areas. Lectures, field experiments, writing assignments, and computer exercises familiarize students with research methods, study design, statistical approaches, and analytical tools for ecological research. Students complete and communicate the results of short field projects in ecology, learn the natural history of the flora and fauna of California, and plan and execute a significant, independent field-research study at the end of the quarter. Enrollment is by application. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, 24, 100; and AMS 7 and 7L. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151B-C-D or ENVS 109B-C-D is required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, 150L, ENVS 104A or 196A.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 109A

Instructor

Donald Croll, Gage Dayton

BIOE 151B Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Ecological Field Methods Laboratory

Field-oriented course in ecological research. Combines overview of methodologies and approaches to field research with practical field studies. Students complete field projects in ecology and also learn the natural history of the flora and fauna of California. Students are billed a materials fee. Enrollment is by application. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, 24, 100; and AMS 7 and 7L; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151A-C-D or ENVS 109A-C-D is required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, 150L, ENVS 104A or 196A.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 109B

Instructor

Donald Croll, Gage Dayton

BIOE 151C Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Functions and Processes of Terrestrial Ecosystems

From lectures and discussion of terrestrial community and ecosystem ecology, students work individually or in small groups to present an idea for a project, review relevant literature, develop a research question/hypothesis, design and perform an experiment, collect and analyze data, and write a report. The instructor evaluates the feasibility of each student's project before it begins. Enrollment is by application. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, 24, 100; and AMS 7 and 7L. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151A-B-D or ENVS 109A-B-D is required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, 150L, ENVS 104A or 196A.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 109C

Instructor

Donald Croll, Gage Dayton

BIOE 151D Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Conservation in Practice

Focuses on current issues in environmental and conservation biology and the emerging field methods used to address them. From field-oriented lectures about current issues in environmental and conservation biology, students pursue research project as individuals and small groups to develop hands-on experience with field skills in conservation research and resource management. Enrollment is by application. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, 24, 100; and AMS 7 and 7L. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151A-B-C or ENVS 109A-B-C required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, 150L, ENVS 104A or 196A.

Credits

4

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 109D

Instructor

Donald Croll, Gage Dayton

BIOE 153A Introduction to Arctic Ecology

Field-intensive course comprised of weekly classes in preparation for the field component. Focuses on issues relevant to the ecology of arctic regions including arctic ecology, arctic geology and paleontology, and arctic environmental change. Students are charged a materials fee. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, and BIOE 20B and 20C; and concurrent enrollment BIOE 153B and 153C.

Credits

5

Instructor

Beth Shapiro

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 153B Arctic Ecology

Field-intensive course focusing on issues relevant to the ecology of the arctic regions. Explores the changing arctic environment through lectures and hands-on research during an 18-day camping trip transecting the subarctic boreal forest to the high Arctic. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, and BIOE 20B and 20C; and concurrent enrollment BIOE 153A and 153C.

Credits

5

Instructor

Beth Shapiro

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 153C Disciplinary Communication for Biologists

Writing-intensive course focusing on developing skills in scientific communication with an emphasis on communicating issues relevant to the ecology of arctic regions. Communication products are developed during an 18-day camping trip in the Arctic. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, and BIOE 20B and 20C; and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; and concurrent enrollment BIOE 153A and 153B.

Credits

5

Instructor

Beth Shapiro

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 155 Freshwater Ecology

Provides an overview of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that characterize inland waters such as lakes, streams, rivers, and wetlands. Also addresses relationships between humans and freshwater, and discusses these challenges in conservation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Eric Palkovacs

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 155L Freshwater Ecology Laboratory

Field and laboratory study of the ecology of freshwater systems including lakes, streams, and estuaries. Students gain experience sampling and identifying freshwater organisms, designing and analyzing ecological experiments, and writing scientific reports. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Eric Palkovacs

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C and BIOE 155.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 158L Marine Ecology Laboratory

Supervised individual research projects in experimental marine biology. Students carry out a complete research project, including (1) the formation of hypotheses; (2) the design and implementation of experiments; (3) collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; and (4) write-up of an oral presentation. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kristy Kroeker, Peter Raimondi

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOE 108; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 159A Marine Ecology Field Quarter: Marine Ecology with Laboratory

Total immersion in marine ecology for very motivated students. Students develop a research project during first five weeks on campus and then spend five weeks of immersion in directed research without distraction in isolated locations off campus (past locations include the Gulf of California in Mexico and Moorea in French Polynesia). Not available through University Extension. No other courses may be taken during this quarter. Students must sign a contract agreeing to standards of behavior outlined in the UCSC Rule Book and by the instructors. Students are billed a materials, transportation (not airfare), and room and board fee. Paradigms and designs in marine ecology. A review of the paradigms that have shaped our understanding of marine ecology and analysis and discussion of experiments with these paradigms. Students carry out a complete research project, including the formation of hypotheses; the design and implementation of experiments; the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; and the write-up and oral presentation of results. Admission by interview during previous winter quarter. BIOE 159A, 159B, 159C, and 159D are equivalent to BIOE 127, 127L, 108, and 158L for major requirements. Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; BIOE 159A, 159B, 159C, and 159D must be taken concurrently.

Credits

5

Instructor

Giacomo Bernardi, Suzanne Alonzo, Peter Raimondi

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 159B Marine Ecology Field Quarter: Ichthyology with Laboratory

An introduction to the biology of jawless, cartilaginous, and bony fishes—their classification, evolution, form, physiology, and ecology. Admission by interview during previous winter quarter. BIOE 159A, 159B, 159C, and 159D are equivalent to BIOE 127, 127L, 108, and 158L for major requirements. BIOE 159A, 159B, 159C, and 159D must be taken concurrently.

Credits

5

Instructor

Giacomo Bernardi, Suzanne Alonzo, Peter Raimondi

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 159C Marine Ecology Field Quarter: Methods in Field Ecology

Students learn quantitative methods for field experiments and surveys. Emphasis will be on marine environments, but there will also be exposure to terrestrial systems. This is the lecture component to course 159D. No text is required for this course; instead, readings from the current literature will be assigned. Students are evaluated on written independent field project proposals and class participation. Admission by interview during previous winter quarter. BIOE 159A, 159B, 159C, and 159D are equivalent to BIOE 127, 127L, 108, and 158L for major requirements. BIOE 159A, 159B, 159C, and 159D must be taken concurrently.

Credits

5

Instructor

Giacomo Bernardi, Suzanne Alonzo, Peter Raimondi

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 159D Marine Ecology Field Quarter: Methods in Field Ecology Laboratory

This is laboratory portion of course 159C. Students carry out independent field projects under the supervision of course instructors. All work is done during the 5-6 week off-campus portion of course 159. Students are evaluated on field techniques, the final write-up of their independent field projects, and class participation. Admission by interview during previous winter quarter. BIOE 159A, 159B, 159C, and 159D are equivalent to BIOE 127, 127L, 108, and 158L for major requirements. BIOE 159A, 159B, 159C, and 159D must be taken concurrently.

Credits

5

Instructor

Giacomo Bernardi, Suzanne Alonzo, Peter Raimondi

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 159E Marine Ecology Field Quarter: Behavioral Ecology

Study of animal behavior from an ecological and evolutionary perspective, using lectures, exercises, discussion, and research experience in the field. Emphasis on marine environments with exposure to extraterrestrial systems and laboratory studies. Focus on how scientists study animal behavior and what has been learned about evolution and ecology and ecology of animal behavior. Admission by interview during previous winter quarter. BIOE 159E is equivalent to BIOE 140 for major requirements. BIOE 159A, 159B, 159C, and 159E must be taken concurrently.

Credits

5

Instructor

Suzanne Alonzo

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 161 Kelp Forest Ecology

Study of organization of kelp forests as models for examining biological communities. The physical and biotic factors responsible for community organization of kelp forests are explored using original literature and data collected in BIOE 161L. Class meets one full morning each week. Prerequisite(s): by interview only; BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C are required. Students must pass the University Research Diving Certification (contact the diving safety officer, Institute of Marine Sciences, for further information). Enrollment is restricted to seniors. BIOE 161L must be taken concurrently; BIOE 107, 120/L, 122/L are recommended.

Credits

5

Instructor

Peter Raimondi, Mark Carr

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 161L Kelp Forest Ecology Laboratory

Fieldwork using SCUBA to quantitatively and qualitatively examine the abundance and distribution of organisms in kelp forests, with additional laboratory work. Culminates with a directed individual research project. Class meets one full morning each week. Students are billed a materials fee. Admission by interview. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; BIOE 161 must be taken concurrently; BIOE 107, 120/L, 122/L are recommended. Students must pass the University Research Diving Certification (contact the Diving Safety Officer, Institute of Marine Sciences, for further information).

Credits

5

Instructor

Peter Raimondi, Mark Carr

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 163 Ecology of Reefs, Mangroves, and Seagrasses

Integrated treatment of coral reefs, sea grasses, and mangroves emphasizing interactions and processes through time. Major topics: biological and geological history, biogeography, evolution and ecology of dominant organisms, biodiversity, community and ecosystem ecology, geology, biogeochemistry, global change, human impacts.

Credits

5

Instructor

Donald Potts

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 163L is required.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 163L Ecology of Reefs, Mangroves, and Seagrasses Laboratory

An interdisciplinary laboratory exploration of the anatomy, morphology, adaptations, diversity, evolution, and ecology of corals, mangroves, and seagrasses and of their physical, chemical, and geological environments.

Credits

2

Instructor

Donald Potts

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 163 is required.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 165 Marine Conservation Biology

Initially undertakes an in-depth comparison of the biology and conservation of marine versus terrestrial ecosystems. With this foundation, course examines marine biodiversity loss resulting from overexploitation, habitat loss, species introduction, and pollution, with particular emphasis on the resulting trophic cascades, biodiversity losses, and climate change. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Environmental Studies 120.

Credits

5

Instructor

Donald Croll

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C; OCEA 101 recommended.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 171 Disciplinary Communication for Biologists

Writing-intensive course focusing on developing skills in scientific communication, with an emphasis on communicating issues relevant to ecologists and evolutionary biologists. Presents the norms and standards of scientific communication spanning multiple genres Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 271.

Credits

5

Instructor

Beth Shapiro

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements, and BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 172 Population Genetics

Basic population genetics and selected topics will be covered, including genetics of speciation, tempo and mode of evolution, genetics of social behavior, natural selection in human populations, and the impact of molecular studies on evolutionary theory. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 272.

Credits

5

Instructor

Grant Pogson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C, and BIOL 105, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 172L is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 172L Population Genetics Laboratory

A companion course to 172 Population Genetics that applies the theory developed in that course to related disciplines including conservation biology, ecology, agriculture, and population biology. Original scientific literature relating to the theory developed in BIOE 172 is read, and applied problem sets are solved by the students. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 272L.

Credits

2

Instructor

Grant Pogson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C, and BIOL 105, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 172 is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 182F Exploring Research in EEB

Provides undergraduate students with exposure to research in the laboratory of an Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) faculty member, affiliate, or adjunct. Students are not expected to do independent research but rather to assist in laboratory or field research projects under the supervision of the faculty mentor or appointed researcher. Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate research contract on file with the department. If supervised by different faculty or researchers, may be repeated for credit.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 183L Undergraduate Research in EEB

Designed to ensure that students are intellectually engaged in the planning or implementation of a supervised or independent research project, achieve a fundamental understanding of implementing the scientific method, and develop their scientific writing and and presentation skills. Prerequisite(s): concurrent enrollment in course 183W and an Undergraduate Research Contract on file with the department.

Credits

3

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 183W Undergraduate Research in EEB--Writing

Working in coordination with an Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) faculty member, affiliate or adjunct, students develop and write a formal research proposal or report and give a presentation on their research project. Includes weekly class meetings focused on the philosophy of science, basic statistics, library searches, inputting data, creating graphs, and preparing results for publication, posters, and talks.

Credits

2

Instructor

Laurel Fox, Mark Carr, Donald Potts

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; and BIOE 107, BIOE 108, or BIOE109; and an undergraduate research contract on file with the department.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 193 Independent Research in EEB

Continued undergraduate research on a project sponsored by an Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) faculty member, affiliate, or adjunct. Students are graded on the quality of their research and meeting the terms of their undergraduate research contract. Prerequisites: course 183W and an undergraduate research contract on file with the department.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOE 193F Independent Research in EEB

Continued undergraduate research on a project sponsored by an Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) faculty member, affiliate, or adjunct. Students are graded on the quality of their research and meeting the terms of their undergraduate research contract. Prerequisites: course 183W and an undergraduate research contract on file with the department.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 195 Senior Thesis

An individually supervised course, with emphasis on independent research. Students required to submit a senior thesis. Enrollment is restricted to majors in biology, ecology and evolution, marine biology, plant sciences, and the combined major with environmental studies. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOE 198F Independent Field Study

Provides for two credits of independent field study (a) by means other than the usual supervision in person, or (b) when the student is doing all or most of the coursework off campus. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOE 199 Tutorial

Reading, discussion, written reports, and laboratory research on selected biological topics, using facilities normally available on campus. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOE 199F Tutorial

Two-credit Tutorial. Reading, discussion, written reports, and laboratory research on selected biological topics, using facilities normally available on campus. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOE 200A Scientific Skills

Exposes graduate students to teaching skills, understanding the scientific method, searching and organizing literature, grant proposal and scientific writing, data management and presentation, and scientific speaking. Students are evaluated on their participation and the quality of a written research proposal.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mark Carr

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 200B Advanced Organismal Biology

Consists of lectures focusing on pivotal topics in ecology and evolution. Relevant background material is developed followed by a critical analysis of readings from the primary literature. Designed to give graduate (and advanced undergraduate) students direct contact with the major areas of research that are currently at the forefront of organismal biology.

Credits

5

Instructor

Suzanne Alonzo, Dan Costa, Auston Kilpatrick

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 208 Marine Ecology

Paradigms and designs in marine ecology. A review of the paradigms that have shaped our understanding of marine ecology; analysis and discussion of experiments with these paradigms. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 108.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kristy Kroeker, Mark Carr

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 245 Plant Ecology

An exploration of the ecology of plant form, function, distribution, abundance, and diversity. Topics include plant adaptations to environmental conditions, life history variation, competition, reproductive ecology, herbivory, and patterns of diversity. Lecture with discussions of original papers and independent field project. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 145.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ingrid Parker

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOE 107 or ENVS 24 or permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 245L Field Methods in Plant Ecology Laboratory

Hands-on exploration of the concepts and techniques of plant ecology. A combination of lab, greenhouse, and field-based exercises (irrespective of weather conditions), statistical analysis, and scientific writing. One required weekend field trip. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 145L.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ingrid Parker

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 247 Community Ecology

Develops the major themes of community ecology: structure, trophic dynamics, succession, complex interactions among species, herbivory, evolution, and coevolution. Uses case histories of well-studied marine and terrestrial systems. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 147.

Credits

5

Instructor

Laurel Fox

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 248A Quantitative Ecology

Incorporates building mathematical models and fitting them to data to answer questions in ecology and evolution. Includes learning to write computer code to simulate models and analyze data. Topics include models of population and evolutionary dynamics, and species interactions and behavior. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 148A.

Credits

5

Instructor

Auston Kilpatrick

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 248B Quantitative Methods in Ecology and Evolution

Advanced methods for building mathematical models and fitting them to data to answer questions in ecology and evolution both mathematically and by writing computer code. Topics include: population dynamics and management, evolution and life-history theory, and behavior and game theory. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 148B. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.

Credits

5

Instructor

Suzanne Alonzo

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 258L Experimental Marine Ecology

Supervised individual research projects in experimental marine biology. Students carry out a complete research project, including (1) the formation of hypotheses, (2) the design and implementation of experiments, (3) collection, analysis, and interpretation of data, and (4) the write-up of an oral presentation. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 208; and interview to assess ability to carry out field project.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kristy Kroeker, Peter Raimondi

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 262 Facilitating Change in Coastal Science Policy

Skills-based course in effective leadership and communication, including stakeholder engagement, facilitation, conflict resolution, team building, and introduction to project management. Communication training includes identifying audiences and objectives (public, philanthropy, policymakers, managers, scientist practitioners) and leveraging non-traditional communication platforms. Enrollment is by application and restricted to graduate students.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

CSP 245

Instructor

Kristy Kroeker

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 271 Disciplinary Communication for Biologists

Writing-intensive course focusing on developing skills in scientific communication, with an emphasis on communicating issues relevant to ecologists and evolutionary biologists. This courses presents the norms and standards of scientific communication spanning multiple genres. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 171.

Credits

5

Instructor

Beth Shapiro

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 272 Population Genetics

Basic population genetics and selected topics are covered including genetics of speciation, tempo and mode of evolution, genetics of social behavior, natural selection in human populations, and the impact of molecular studies on evolutionary theory. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Biology 172.

Credits

5

Instructor

Grant Pogson

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 272L is required. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 272L Population Genetics Laboratory

A companion course to 272 Population Genetics that applies the theory developed in that course to related disciplines including conservation biology, ecology, agriculture, and population biology. Original scientific literature relating to the theory developed in course 272 is read, and applied problem sets are solved by the students. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 172L.

Credits

2

Instructor

Grant Pogson

Requirements

Must be taken concurrently with BIOE 272. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 279 Evolutionary Ecology

Analysis of the ways in which ongoing evolution and coevolution shape the ecological structure and dynamics of populations, species, and species interactions across geographic landscapes.

Credits

5

Instructor

John Thompson

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 281A Topics in Basic and Applied Marine Ecology

Seminar focusing on concepts in basic and applied ecology. Structure rotates quarterly between graduate student research and readings of journal articles and textbooks.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mark Carr

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281B Topics in Molecular Evolution

A discussion of current research and literature review on the subject of molecular evolution. Primary focus on recent results on molecular phylogenetics and molecular population genetics.

Credits

2

Instructor

Giacomo Bernardi

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281C Topics in Physiological Ecology

An intensive seminar focusing on the interaction between physiological constraint and life history options and solutions employed by animals. Topics vary from comparative physiology to ecological theory. Participants are required to present results of their own research or review papers of interest.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dan Costa

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281D Topics in Global Change Ecology

Focuses on fundamental concepts in global-change ecology, with emphasis on coastal and marine ecosystems and issues of sustainability. The seminar is devoted to reading and evaluating current and classic literature and discussing graduate student research.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kristy Kroeker

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281E Topics in Freshwater Ecology

Current topics in freshwater ecology, eco-evolutionary dynamics, fisheries, and fish ecology.

Credits

5

Instructor

Eric Palkovacs

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission from instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 281F Ecological Research Topics

Intensive research and discussions on plant-animal interactions. All students undertake a research project and meet weekly with the faculty sponsor to monitor progress. The group meets weekly to discuss experimental design and analysis, specific problems related to the students' research, relevant research papers, or manuscripts that the group members are writing. Each student gives a formal presentation of research plans or progress each quarter.

Credits

5

Instructor

Laurel Fox

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281G Topics in Sexual Selection and Social Behavior

Discussion of current topics, research, and methods in sexual selection and social behavior focusing on theoretical and empirical research and links between evolution and ecology. Students present and discuss their research, read and discuss current and classic literature, or read and discuss methods used in the field.

Credits

5

Instructor

Suzanne Alonzo

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Qualified undergraduates may enroll by permission of the instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281H Topics in Comparative Marine Physiology

Intensive seminar on selected topics in marine physiology. Students present results from their own research and discuss recent advances from the literature.

Credits

5

Instructor

Rita Mehta

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281I Topics in Disease Ecology, Population Biology, and Conservation

Selected topics in population biology and disease ecology. Students present results from their own research and discuss recent advances from the literature. (Formerly Topics in Plant Population and Disease Ecology)

Credits

5

Instructor

Auston Kilpatrick

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll by permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281K Topics in Plant Evolution

Intensive seminar on selected topics in plant evolution. Students present results from their own research and discuss recent advances from the literature.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kathleen Kay

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll by permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281L Topics in Behavioral and Evolutionary Ecology

An intensive seminar on selected topics in behavioral and evolutionary ecology. Students are expected to discuss the current literature and present literature reviews, research proposals, and preliminary results from their ongoing research.

Credits

5

Instructor

Bruce Lyon

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281N Topics in Marine Vertebrate Ecology

Seminar on the ecology of marine vertebrates. Topics vary from the factors that explain the distribution of marine predators to island biogeography and the ecosystem effects of introduced vertebrates on islands.

Credits

5

Instructor

Donald Croll

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281O Topics in Plant-Water Relations

Intensive seminar focusing on fundamental and evolutionary concepts in plant-water relations. Students present results from their own research and discuss recent advances from the literature.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jarmila Pittermann

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll by permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281P Topics in Plant Population Ecology

An intensive seminar on selected topics in plant ecology and population biology. Students present results from their own research and discuss recent advances from the literature.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ingrid Parker

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission from instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281Q Topics in Molecular Evolutionary Genetics

An intensive seminar on selected topics in molecular evolutionary genetics. Students are required to present results from their own research projects, present a critical review paper at least once during the quarter, and submit a written research proposal.

Credits

5

Instructor

Grant Pogson

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduate students may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281R Topics in Marine Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

An intensive seminar series focusing on fundamental concepts in marine ecology. Emphasis changes quarter to quarter. At least one quarter per year is devoted to discussion of graduate student research. Other quarters involve reading and evaluating current and classic literature on marine ecology and evolutionary biology.

Credits

5

Instructor

Peter Raimondi

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281S Topics in Ancient DNA and Paleogenomics

Topics in population genetics and genomics, focusing on work involving paleontological and archaeological material. Students present weekly written and oral reports of their research projects. Once each term, students critique a recent publication.

Credits

5

Instructor

Beth Shapiro

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission from instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281T Species Interactions and Coevolution

The genetics and ecological structure of species interactions, and the role of coevolution between species in shaping biodiversity.

Credits

5

Instructor

John Thompson

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring

BIOE 281U Topics in Invertebrate Biology

An intensive study about concepts, theory, and techniques for graduate students conducting research on the ecology, genetics, evolution, systematics, or biodiversity of marine invertebrates.

Credits

5

Instructor

Donald Potts

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; advanced undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281V Topics in Behavioral Ecology

A discussion of current topics and methods in behavioral ecology and life history evolution.

Credits

5

Instructor

Barry Sinervo

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 281W Topics in Exercise and Environmental Physiology

A weekly seminar discussion on current research and techniques in mammalian exercise and environmental physiology. Areas covered include locomotor physiology, exercise testing and cardiovascular monitoring, and biomechanics. Oral presentation of ongoing research or current literature required from each student.

Credits

5

Instructor

Terrie Williams

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter

BIOE 286 Experimental Design and Data Analysis

Focuses on problems and designs in ecology and population biology. Topics include experimental design; exploratory data analysis; hands-on statistics; and graphical theory. Structured around a statistical analysis and graphics program to teach students to design surveys and experiments and analyze data. Previous work in statistics strongly recommended.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

CSP 241

Instructor

Peter Raimondi

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 286L is required. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 286L Experimental Design and Data Analysis Lab

Lab will focuses on hands-on statistical problem solving, graphical presentations and experimental design issues.

Credits

2

Cross Listed Courses

CSP 241L

Instructor

Peter Raimondi

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 286 is required. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 293 Readings in Ecology and Evolution

Weekly readings and discussions of recent research papers in ecology, evolution, and related topics from organismal biology.

Credits

2

Instructor

John Thompson, Bruce Lyon

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring

BIOE 294 Ecology, Evolutionary Biology Seminar

Selected topics of current interest to ecologists and evolutionary biologists presented by weekly guest speakers.

Credits

0

Instructor

Barry Sinervo, Terrie Williams, Donald Potts

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 295 Advanced Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Seminar

Course consists of extended weekly meetings organized around an advanced theme in theoretical or applied evolutionary biology, ecology, physiology, behavior, or other aspect of oranismal biology. Course is targeted at students who already have reached a professional level of expertise in their field and advanced master students.

Credits

0

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOE 297A Independent Study

Independent study for graduate students who have not yet settled on a research area for their thesis. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

BIOE 297B Independent Study

Independent study for graduatestudents who have not yet settled on a research area for their thesis. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

BIOE 297C Independent Study

Independent study for graduate students who have not yet settled on a research area for their thesis. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

BIOE 299A Thesis Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

BIOE 299B Thesis Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

BIOE 299C Thesis Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

BIOL 15 Undergraduate Research Reports

Undergraduate students who work in faculty research laboratories present the results of their projects. Organized by the Minority Undergraduate Research Program and the Minority Access to Research Careers Program. Designed for students with membership in the above-mentioned programs. Prerequisite(s): qualifications as determined by instructor at first class meeting.

Credits

1

Instructor

Alan Zahler, Melissa Jurica

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Spring

BIOL 20A Cell and Molecular Biology

Introduction to biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, and genetics.

Credits

5

Instructor

John Tamkun, Michael Rexach

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1A; students with a chemistry AP score of 4 or higher who wish to start their biology coursework prior to completing the CHEM 1A, may enroll by permission of the instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOL 20L Experimental Biology Laboratory

Provides biology majors with the theory and practice of experimental biology. A wide range of concepts and techniques used in the modern laboratory are included in the exercises. Designed to satisfy the introductory biology lab requirement of many medical and professional schools. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and previous or concurrent enrollment in BIOE 20B.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOL 80A Female Physiology and Gynecology

Biochemical, medical, social, and clinical aspects of the female body. Emphasis will be on biological-chemical interactions in the female organs. Topics include female anatomy, cell physiology, endocrine functions, sexuality and intimacy, sexually transmitted diseases, puberty, pregnancy, menopause, birth control, abortion, immunity, cancer.

Credits

5

General Education Code

SI

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 80E Evolution

Introduction to Darwinian evolution including how the theory was devised and a discussion of other theories proposed at the time. Explores the facts and evidence of evolutionary processes and the insights they provide in biological diversity, consequences of extinction, and emergence of new diseases. Includes a discussion of evolution and spirituality.

Credits

5

General Education Code

SI

BIOL 80J Biology of Emerging and Pandemic Diseases

Designed to introduce non-biology majors to the biology of viruses, the human immune system, HIV/AIDS, and emerging viral pandemics. Also explores vaccine technology and viral mediated therapies. Social, political, and economic influences of HIV and other viral pandemics discussed.

Credits

5

General Education Code

PE-T

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOL 86 Research Deconstruction: MCD Biology

Explores scientific principles and logic through research seminars in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. Additional topics may include diseases, stem cell biology, and other medically relevant areas in biomedical research. Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 3 or equivalent (i.e., mathematics placement examination score), and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to first-year, sophomore, and junior students. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.

Credits

3

Instructor

Grant Hartzog

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 88 Studies in Medicine: Its Art, History, Science, and Philosophy

An interdisciplinary, multicultural, and historical perspective of medicine focused primarily upon therapy and practice to achieve better understanding of the scope, practice, and limits or medicine.

Credits

5

Instructor

Grant Hartzog

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements.

General Education Code

SI

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 100 Biochemistry

An introduction to biochemistry including biochemical molecules, protein structure and function, membranes, bioenergetics, and regulation of biosynthesis. Provides students with basic essentials of modern biochemistry and the background needed for upper-division biology courses. Students who plan to do advanced work in biochemistry and molecular biology should take the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 100 series directly. Students cannot receive credit for this course after they have completed any two courses from the BIOC 100A, BIOC 100B, and BIOC 100C sequence.

Credits

5

Instructor

Douglas Kellogg, Jeremy Sanford

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOE 20B; and CHEM 8A or CHEM 112A.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 100L Biochemistry Laboratory

Basic techniques and principles of laboratory biochemistry including isolation and characterization of a natural product, manipulation of proteins and nucleic acids to demonstrate basic physical and chemical properties; and characterization of enzyme substrate interactions. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 100 or BIOC 100A; BIOL 101L or BIOL 102L; and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to biological sciences and affiliated majors and biology minors. Non-majors may enroll by permission of the instructor.

BIOL 101 Molecular Biology

Covers the basic molecular mechanism of DNA replication and transcription, protein synthesis, and gene regulation in bacterial and eukaryotic organisms. The experimental techniques used to determine these mechanisms are emphasized. Unless students have already passed BIOL 20L, they are strongly encouraged to enroll in BIOL 101L.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Jurica, Christopher Vollmers

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 100 or BIOC 100A.

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring

BIOL 101L Molecular Biology Laboratory

Laboratory course providing hands-on experience with, and covering conceptual background in, fundamental techniques in molecular biology and biochemistry, including DNA cloning, PCR, restriction digest, gel electrophoresis, protein isolation, protein quantification, protein immunoblot (Western) analysis, and use of online bioinformatics tools. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 20L or BIOL 102J, and BIOL 101 or BIOC 100A is required. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOL 102L. Enrollment is restricted to biochemistry and molecular biology, biology B.S., molecular, cell, and developmental biology, and neuroscience majors.

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOL 102J Toxic RNA Lab I

Introduction to hypothesis-driven laboratory research. Students will create models of a unique uncharacterized disease causing mutation using site directed mutagenesis. An understanding of introductory molecular biology and genetics required. Students are billed a materials fee. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A. Enrollment restricted to biological sciences and affiliated majors with sophomore standing or higher. Enrollment by application and permission of instructor.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOL 102L Toxic RNA Lab II

Introduces hypothesis-driven laboratory research. Students create models of a unique uncharacterized disease causing mutation and determine how it impacts the process of pre-mRNA splicing. An understanding of introductory molecular biology and genetics is required. Students are billed a materials fee. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A; and BIOL 20L or BIOL 102J. Enrollment is restricted to sophomore, junior, and senior biological sciences and affiliated majors. Enrollment is by application and permission of the instructor.

Credits

5

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOL 103L Toxic RNA Lab III

Introduces hypothesis-driven laboratory research. Students create models of a unique, uncharacterized, disease-causing mutation and determine how it impacts the process of pre-mRNA splicing. An understanding of introductory molecular biology and genetics is required. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 102J and BIOL 102L and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition is requirements. Enrollment is restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors majoring in biology, molecular, cell, and developmental biology, neuroscience, human biology, and biochemistry and molecular biology. Enrollment is by application and permission of the instructor.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 105 Genetics

Mendelian and molecular genetics; mechanisms of heredity, mutation, recombination, and gene action.

Credits

5

Instructor

Susan Strome, Jeremy Lee, Needhi Bhalla

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOE 20B.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOL 105L Eukaryotic Genetics Laboratory

Classical and newly developed molecular-genetic techniques used to explore genetic variation in wild populations of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Topics include Mendelian fundamentals, mapping, design of genetic screens, bio-informatic and database analysis, genetic enhancers, and population genetics. Students are billed a materials fee. Enrollment is restricted to biological sciences and affiliated majors; biology minors; non-majors by instructor permission.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 100 or BIOC 100A; BIOL 101L or BIOL 102L; BIOL 105; and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition Requirements.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 109L Yeast Molecular Genetics Laboratory

Using budding yeast as an experimental organism, this laboratory provides practical experience in classic and modern molecular biology and in genetic and epigenetic methods, and develops strong scientific communication skills. Topics include mendelian genetics, linkage, gene replacement, chromatin immunoprecipitation and epigenetics. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 101 or BIOC 100A; and BIOL 101L or BIOL 102L, and BIOL 105. BIOL 115 strongly recommended. Satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to biological sciences and affiliated majors; biology minors. Non-majors enroll by instructor permission.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 110 Cell Biology

Covers the structure, organization, and function of eukaryotic cells. Topics include biological membranes, organelles, protein and vesicular trafficking, cellular interactions, the cytoskeleton, and signal transduction. Requires a good understanding of basic biochemistry and molecular biology.

Credits

5

Instructor

Lindsay Hinck, Michael Rexach

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 101 or BIOC 100A; and BIOL 105; and BIOL 101L or BIOL 102L or BIOL 20L.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 111 Immunology

Immune systems--their manifestations and mechanisms of action.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOL 105, and BIOL 110.

BIOL 111A Immunology I

Principles and concepts of the innate and adaptive immune systems, with emphasis on mechanisms of action and molecular and cellular networks. The development, differentiation, and maturation of cells of the immune system are also discussed.

Credits

5

Instructor

Susan Carpenter

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): courses BIOE 20B, BIOL 20A, BIOL 105, and BIOL 110.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOL 111B Immunology II

The immune system in health and disease, including failures of host immune-defense mechanisms, allergy and hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, transplantation biology, the immune response to tumors, immune-system interactions with pathogens, and manipulation of the immune response.

Credits

5

Instructor

Martha Zuniga

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 111A.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 112 Virology

Principles of virology illustrated through study of specific examples. Topics include: viral genome organization, viral assembly, virus-host interactions, genetic diversity of viruses, viral ecology, and the epidemiology of viral diseases. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 101 and 110 and consent of instructor.

Credits

3

Instructor

Martha Zuniga

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOL 114 Cancer Cell Biology

Focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms behind cancer. Topics covered include oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, cell growth genes, checkpoint genes, telomeres, and apoptosis. Students will gain experience in reading the primary scientific literature.

Credits

5

Instructor

Alan Zahler

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 or BIOL 115.

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 115 Eukaryotic Molecular Biology

Covers eukaryotic gene and genome organization; DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis; regulation of gene expression; chromosome structure and organization; and the application of recombinant DNA technology to the study of these topics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Hanns Boeger

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 101 or BIOC 100A; and BIOL 105; and BIOL 101L or BIOL 102L. Enrollment restricted to biological sciences and affiliated majors, non-majors by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOL 115L Eukaryotic Molecular Biology Laboratory

A laboratory designed to provide students with direct training in basic molecular techniques. Each laboratory is a separate module which together builds to allow cloning, isolation, and identification of a nucleic acid sequence from scratch. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOL 187L or BIOL 287L. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 100 or BIOC 100A; BIOL 101L or BIOL 102L; and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition Requirements; and previous or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 101 or BIOL 115. Restricted to molecular, cell and developmental biology majors and affiliated majors; biology minors; other majors by permission.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 116 Advanced Topics in Cell Biology

Advanced course in cell biology featuring small-classroom discussion of topics related to the structure and function of cells and their organelles. Emphasis is given to experimental strategies used in cell biology research. Requires discussion of scientific literature and student-led presentations.

Credits

3

Instructor

Michael Rexach

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110. Enrollment is restricted to senior human biology, molecular, cell, and developmental biology, and neuroscience majors. Other majors by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 117 Global Health and Neglected Diseases

Neglected tropical diseases afflict more than 1 billion of the poorest individuals on the planet. This course covers the molecular basis and pathology of the most prevalent neglected diseases and emerging strategies to combat these diseases. (Formerly Neglected Tropical Diseases.)

Credits

3

Instructor

William Sullivan

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110. Enrollment is restricted to senior human biology, molecular, cell, and developmental biology, and neuroscience majors. Other majors by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOL 120 Developmental Biology

A description and analysis of selected developmental events in the life cycle of animals. Experimental approaches to understanding mechanisms are emphasized. (Formerly Development.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Zhu Wang

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOL 120L Development Laboratory

Experimental studies of animal development using a variety of locally obtainable organisms. Approximately eight hours weekly, but it will often be necessary to monitor continuing experiments throughout the week. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 100 or BIOC 100A; and BIOL 101L or BIOL 102L; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Previous or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 120 is required. Enrollment is restricted to biological sciences and affiliated majors; biology minors; other majors by permission.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOL 121L Environmental Phage Biology Laboratory

Introduction to hypothesis-driven laboratory research. Students isolate a unique bacteriophage and characterize its structure and genome. An understanding of molecular biology and basic genetics is required. Students are billed a materials fee. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 100 or BIOC 100A; and BIOL 101L or 102L; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to biological sciences and affiliated majors with sophomore standing or higher. Enrollment is by application and permission of instructor.

Credits

5

BIOL 125 Introduction to Neuroscience

The structure and function of the nervous system. Topics include elementary electrical principles, biophysics and physiology of single nerve and muscle cells, signal transduction at synapses, development of the nervous system, and neural basis of behavior. Requires a good understanding of basic biochemistry, cell biology, and molecular biology.

Credits

5

Instructor

James Ackman

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B; and BIOL 101 or BIOC 100A; previous or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 110 is required.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter

BIOL 126 Advanced Molecular Neuroscience

Explores in detail cellular and molecular events that underlay the function of the nervous system. Topics include neural development, axon guidance and regeneration, advanced electrical principles (synaptic transmission through a variety of receptors), synaptic plasticity, learning and memory, as well as several neural disorders. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 226.

Credits

5

Instructor

David Feldheim, Yi Zuo

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 125. Enrollment is restricted to neuroscience majors and proposed majors.

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 127 Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Disease

Focuses on cellular and molecular processes that underlie neurodegenerative diseases. Includes lectures, student oral presentations, discussions, a term paper, and exams.

Credits

5

Instructor

William Saxton

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110.

General Education Code

TA

BIOL 128 Developmental Neurobiology

Covers the principles of nervous-system development from the molecular control of development, cell-cell interactions, to the role of experience in influencing brain structure and function. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 228.

Credits

5

Instructor

Bin Chen

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 and BIOL 125. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOL 130 Human Physiology

Function, organization, and regulation of the major organ systems of humans, with emphasis on integration among systems. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 131.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Summer

BIOL 130L Human Physiology Laboratory

Examines fundamental principles of systemic physiology focusing on the human. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 131L. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110; BIOL 20L or 102J; and previous or concurrent enrollment in BIOL130 is required.Satisfaction of Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to biological sciences and affiliated majors; biology minors; other majors by permission.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Summer

BIOL 140 The RNA World

This active-learning course explores the origins, evolution, and functions of ribonucleic acid (RNA), including ribozymes, ribosomes, IRNAs, spliceosomes, riboswitches, messenger RNA, microRNAs, snRNAs, snoRNAs, and other guide RNAs, CRISPR, long noncoding RNAs, retrotransposons, and RNA viruses.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 105 or BME 105, and BIOL 101.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 186F Undergraduate Research in MCD Biology

Supervised undergraduate research in laboratory of an MCD biology faculty member accompanied by weekly lectures on ethical and practical scientific issues. Topics include: laboratory safety; the scientific method; the collection, treatment, and presentation of data; critical evaluation of scientific literature; scientific misconduct; and peer review. Career issues, including how to apply for admission to graduate and professional schools, are also discussed. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 100 or BIOC 100A; and BIOL 20L or BIOL 102J; and previous completion of the Disciplinary Communication requirement. Each enrolled student must have a committed MCD faculty sponsor by the first class meeting. Enrollment is restricted to biology and affiliated majors.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 186L Undergraduate Research in MCD Biology

Supervised undergraduate research in laboratory of an MCD biology faculty member accompanied by weekly lectures on ethical and practical scientific issues. Topics include: laboratory safety; the scientific method; the collection, treatment, and presentation of data; critical evaluation of scientific literature; scientific misconduct; and peer review. Career issues, including how to apply for admission to graduate and professional schools, are also discussed. Prerequisite(s): Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; BIOL 100 or BIOC 100A; and BIOL 20L or BIOL 102J. Each enrolled student must have a committed MCD faculty sponsor by the first class meeting. Enrollment is restricted to biology and affiliated majors.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 186R Undergraduate Research in MCD Biology

Supervised undergraduate research in the laboratory of an MCD biology faculty member accompanied by weekly lectures on practical scientific issues. Topics include: laboratory safety; the scientific method; the collection, treatment, and presentation of data; critical evaluation of scientific literature; ethics and scientific misconduct; and peer review. Career issues, including how to apply for admission to graduate and professional schools, are discussed. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 186L. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 100 or BIOC 100A; and BIOL 20L or BIOL 102J; and previous completion of the Disciplinary Communication requirement. Each enrolled student must have a committed MCD faculty sponsor by the first class. Enrollment is restricted to MCD Biology-affiliated majors.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 188 A Life in Medicine

Students explore healthcare from the perspectives of both clinicians and patients. The class focuses on medicine's cognitive, emotional, and spiritual elements, with the goal of understanding the rewards and costs of healthcare practice. (Formerly Life in Healthcare.)

Credits

3

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior human biology majors, and others by permission of instructor.

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Fall, Spring

BIOL 189 Health Sciences Internship

Structured off-campus learning experience providing experience and pre-professional mentoring in a variety of health-related settings. Interns are trained and supervised by a professional at their placement and receive academic guidance from their faculty sponsor. Students spend 8 hours per week at their placement, participate in required class meetings on campus, and keep a reflective journal. Enrollment is by application. Students interview with health sciences internship coordinator; applications are due one quarter in advance to the Health Sciences Internship Office. Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; previous or concurrent enrollment in course 189W is required. Enrollment is restricted to human biology majors.

Credits

3

Instructor

Lindsay Hinck, Martha Zuniga, Michael Rexach

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOL 189W Disciplinary Communication: Human Biology

Writing-intensive course offered in conjunction with the health sciences internship. Weekly class meetings include academic guidance and mentoring as well as discussion of the mechanisms and conventions of academic writing about heath and health care. Students complete multiple writing assignments, culminating in a term paper in the format of a scholarly article. Enrollment is by application. Students interview with the health-sciences internship coordinator; applications are due one quarter in advance to the Health Care Sciences Internship Office. Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Previous or concurrent enrollment in course 189 is required. Enrollment is restricted to human biology majors.

Credits

2

Instructor

Lindsay Hinck, Martha Zuniga, Michael Rexach

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOL 195 Senior Thesis Research

An individually supervised course, with emphasis on independent research, to culminate in a senior thesis. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 198 Independent Field Study

Provides for individual programs of study (a) by means other than the usual supervision in person, or (b) when the student is doing all or most of the coursework off campus. With permission of the department, may be repeated for credit, or two or three courses taken concurrently. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 198F Independent Field Study

Provides for two credits of independent field study (a) by means other than the usual supervision in person, or (b) when the student is doing all or most of the coursework off campus. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 199 Tutorial

Reading, discussion, written reports, and laboratory research on selected biological topics, using facilities normally available on campus. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 199F Tutorial

Two-credit Tutorial. Reading, discussion, written reports, and laboratory research on selected biological topics, using facilities normally available on campus. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 200A Critical Analysis of Scientific Literature

Development of critical thinking skills via discussion of research articles on a broad range of topics. Prepares students to critically evaluate research publications, and improves their ability to organize effective oral presentations and to evaluate the oral presentations of other scientists.

Credits

5

Instructor

John Tamkun, Jeremy Sanford

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students in MCD biology, or by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOL 200B Advanced Molecular Biology

An in-depth coverage of the structure, function, and synthesis of DNA, RNA, and proteins. Discussion of the roles of macromolecules in the regulation of information in the cell.

Credits

5

Instructor

Alan Zahler, Melissa Jurica, Hanns Boeger

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOL 200C Advanced Cell Biology

An in-depth coverage of topics in cellular and subcellular organization, structure, and function in plants and animals. Emphasis on current research problems.

Credits

5

Instructor

Douglas Kellogg, William Saxton, Needhi Bhalla

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200B. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 200D Developmental Biology

Key topics in developmental biology, including developmental genetics, epigenetics, stem cell biology, and developmental neurobiology. Lectures are accompanied by critical analysis and discussion of recent publications.

Credits

5

Instructor

Susan Strome, Bin Chen, Zhu Wang

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students in MCD biology, or by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 200E Experimental Design

A multidisciplinary course that focuses on topics to consider when tackling biomedical research questions experimentally. Lectures highlight important issues to take into account, are coupled with group discussions and intensive analysis of primary literature, and involve case studies to practically demonstrate how how these considerations might be implemented.

Credits

3

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 200A is required.

BIOL 200F Logic and Approaches to Scientific Discovery

Multidisciplinary course with an emphasis on discussion of approaches and methods involved in the study of biological questions. Lectures focus on current gaps in our knowledge of topics and approaches to test models and hypotheses. Course focuses on current topics in RNA and DNA molecular biology, cell biology, developmental biology, stem cells, neurobiology, and genomics. Lectures coupled with small group discussions and written assignments.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200A. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

BIOL 201 RNA Processing

An advanced graduate-level course on biological aspects of RNA function and processing in eukaryotes. Lectures and discussions will be developed using the current literature.

Credits

5

Instructor

Manuel Ares, Melissa Jurica

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200B or permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

BIOL 203 Ribosomes and Translation

Covers the field of ribosome research in depth, including the structure and function of ribosomes and the molecular mechanisms of protein synthesis. Begins with historical review of the ribosome field and proceeds to the most recent findings. Focus is on central questions: (1) How is the accuracy of the aminoacyl-tRNA selection determined? (2) What is accommodation? (3) What is the mechanism of peptide bond formation (peptidyl transferase)? (4) What is the mechanism of translocation? (5) What are the mechanistic roles of the ribosome and translation factor EF-G in translocation? (6) To what extent is the mechanism of translation determined by RNA? (7) Why is RNA so well suited for the ribosome? (8) How did translation evolve from an RNA world?

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOC 100A, BIOL 200B or permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

BIOL 204 Chromatin

Eukaryotic DNA is complexed with histones to form chromatin. This course focuses on the ways in which chromatin influences and is manipulated to regulate gene expression

Credits

5

Instructor

Grant Hartzog, John Tamkun

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 105 and BIOL 115; undergrads by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

BIOL 205 Epigenetics

In-depth coverage of epigenetics focusing on how alterations in chromatin structure and DNA methylation establish and maintain heritable states of gene expression. Lectures are supplemented with critical discussion of recent publications.

Credits

5

Instructor

John Tamkun, Susan Strome

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 105 and BIOL 115, or permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

BIOL 206 Introduction to Stem Cell Biology

Fundamental concepts, experimental approaches, and current advances in stem cell biology, with consideration of key ethical issues. Topics include: self-renewal and differentiation; the microenvironment; epigenetics; cell-cycle regulation; and how basic research translates to medical therapeutics. Ethical, moral, and political issues surrounding stem cell research are discussed with lectures from philosophy and other relevant disciplines.

Credits

5

Instructor

William Sullivan

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

BIOL 206L Current Protocols in Stem Cell Biology

Provides students with hands-on experience in embryonic stem cell culture methods.

Credits

5

Instructor

David Feldheim, Yi Zuo

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll by permission of instructor.

BIOL 208 Cellular Signaling Mechanisms

All eukaryotic cells utilize intricate signaling pathways to control such diverse events as cell-cell communication, cell division, and changes in cell morphology. This course covers the molecular basis of these cellular signaling pathways, focusing on the most current research.

Credits

5

Instructor

Douglas Kellogg

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 105, BIOL 110, and BIOL 115. Enrollment is restricted to seniors and graduate students.

BIOL 214 Advances in Cancer Biology

Provides students with knowledge of the latest concepts in cancer biology and cancer therapeutics, and a general appreciation of the rapid advances being made in this area of biomedicine.

Credits

5

Instructor

Lindsay Hinck

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200B or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

BIOL 215 Applied Statistics for Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology

For experimental biologists: focuses on resolving practical statistical issues typically encountered in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology lab research. No prior experience in statistics or programming is necessary.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology.

BIOL 217 Influence of Environment and Experience on Brain Development

How environmental factors (animals' experiences, environmental toxins, etc.) affect the formation of neuronal circuits and brain function. Lectures and discussions use current literature.

Credits

5

Instructor

Donald Smith, Yi Zuo

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200A, BIOL 200B, BIOL 200C, and BIOL 200D, or by permission of the instructor. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOL 218 CRISPR/Cas Technologies

Provides an overview of the continually emerging roles for CRISPR in biomedical research. Topics will include an overview of the CRISPR genome defense systems in bacteria, the mechanisms of DNA cleavage and repair, the many uses of CRISPR as a genome editing tool in model organisms, and discussions on the ethical use of the technology in precision medicine.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200A, BIOL 200B, and BIOL 200C. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOL 226 Advanced Molecular Neuroscience

Basis of neural behavior at the cellular, molecular and system levels. First half of course focuses on cellular, molecular, and developmental aspects of the nervous system and covers two sensory systems: olfaction and auditory. Last half of course concerns higher-level functions of the nervous system, such as processing and integrating information. Discusses human diseases and disorders.

Credits

5

Instructor

Yi Zuo

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 228 Developmental Neurobiology

Covers the principles of nervous-system development from the molecular control of development, and cell-cell interactions, to the role of experience in influencing brain structure and function. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 128. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students and by permission of the instructor.

Credits

5

Instructor

Bin Chen

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOL 280A Topics in Research on Molecular Genetics of Yeast

Intensive research seminar on the structure and function of the gene expression machinery in the simple eukaryote Saccharomyces cervisiae and its relationship to the human gene expression machinery.

Credits

2

Instructor

Manuel Ares

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with approval of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280B Chromatin Structure and Transcriptional Regulation

Weekly seminar on structure and gene regulatory function of chromatin. Discusses research of participants and relevant scientific literature.

Credits

2

Instructor

Hanns Boeger

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280C Mammalian Brain Development

Seminar covers research into the development of the mammalian brain.

Credits

2

Instructor

Bin Chen

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280D RNA Processing

A discussion of current research and literature concerning the regulation of precursor messenger RNA processing.

Credits

2

Instructor

Alan Zahler

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280E Meiotic Chromosome Dynamics

Intensive course on the molecular mechanisms underlying homolog pairing, synapses, and recombination; and how they are regulated, coordinated, and monitored to ensure accurate meiotic chromosome segregation.

Credits

2

Instructor

Needhi Bhalla

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280F Development of Vertebrate Neural Connections

Intensive research seminar on molecular mechanisms by which neural connections are established during mouse development. Special focus on topographic maps and role of Eph receptors and ephrins in this process.

Credits

2

Instructor

David Feldheim

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280G Physiology of the Developing Brain

Research seminar covering circuit structure and function in the developing brain.

Credits

2

Instructor

James Ackman

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll by permission of the instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280H Topics on Research into Chromatin and Transcription

Seminar covering research into the effects of chromatin on transcription in yeast.

Credits

2

Instructor

Grant Hartzog

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280I Epigenetic Gene Silencing and Insulators

Intensive course on molecular mechanisms by which insulator elements regulate epigenetic gene silencing.

Credits

2

Instructor

Rohinton Kamakaka

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280J Structures of Macromolecular Complexes

Focuses on structure and function of the spliceosome using electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography. Participants present results from their own research and relevant journal articles.

Credits

2

Instructor

Melissa Jurica

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280K Topics in Cell Cycle Research

An intensive seminar focusing on current research on the molecular mechanisms that control cell division. Participants are required to present results of their own research or to review journal articles of interest.

Credits

2

Instructor

Douglas Kellogg

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280L Development

Seminar covering research into breast development and cancer. (Formerly Topics on Neural Development.)

Credits

2

Instructor

Lindsay Hinck

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280M Post-Transcriptional Control of Mammalian Gene Expression

Intensive course on the molecular mechanisms by which RNA binding proteins regulate gene expression.

Credits

2

Instructor

Jeremy Sanford

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with the permission of the instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280N Long Noncoding RNA and the Immune System

Weekly seminar discussion of the current research and literature concerning the functions for long noncoding RNA in gene regulation within inflammatory signaling pathways.

Credits

2

Instructor

Susan Carpenter

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll by permission of the instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280P Quality Control in Gene Expression

Intensive, discussion-based course concerning ongoing research in quality control and gene expression via analysis of published and unpublished observations and theories.

Credits

2

Instructor

Joshua Arribere

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280Q Cell Biology of Oocytes, Embryos, and Neurons

Weekly seminar and round-table discussion about research problems and recent advances in molecular motor proteins, cytoskeletons, and the control of force-producing processes. Each participant reports recent advances in their field from current literature, their own primary research questions, current approaches to answering those questions, and their research progress.

Credits

2

Instructor

William Saxton

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280R Gene regulation in C. elegans and human parasitic namtodes

Intense weekly seminar on the mechanisms of gene regulation, focusing on C. elegans and human parasitic nematodes.

Credits

2

Instructor

Jordan Ward

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with the permission of the instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280S Chromatin and RNA Regulation in <i>C. elegans</i>

Intensive research seminar about regulators of chromatin organization; the composition and function of germ granules; and the roles of both levels of regulation in germline development in C. elegans. Participants present their research results and report on related journal articles.

Credits

2

Instructor

Susan Strome

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280T Molecular Biology of <I>Drosophila</I> Development

An intensive seminar concerning the molecular genetics of Drosophila. Recent research is discussed weekly, with an emphasis on gene regulation and development. Students present their own research or critical reviews of recent articles at least once during the quarter.

Credits

2

Instructor

John Tamkun

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280U Discussions on the Development of the <I>Drosophila</I> Embryo

Involves a two-hour weekly meeting in which the students discuss topics concerning the cell cycle, early embryonic development, and the cytoskeleton. These discussions critically evaluate ongoing research in this area. Material is drawn from student research and recently published journal articles. Students are also expected to meet individually with the instructor two hours weekly. In addition to a three–five page research proposal, each student gives two one-hour oral presentations.

Credits

2

Instructor

William Sullivan

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280V Translational pediatric genomics

Weekly discussion of the current research and literature on translational pediatric genomics. Specific patient cases may be discussed.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll by permission of the instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280W Development, Connectivity, and Genetic Identity of Neural Circuits

This seminar course will cover the current topics and progress of neuroscience research on neural circuit development, connectivity, function and genetics. (Formerly Membrane Proteins.)

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOL 280X RNA-mediated epigenetic inheritance

Intensive research seminar about epigenetic inheritance and the role of small non-coding RNAs in the intergenerational inheritance of paternal environmental effects. Participants present their research results and report on related journal articles.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll by permission of the instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280Y Activity-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity

Research seminar covering the regulation of synaptic plasticity in the mammalian nervous system, focusing on how the activity regulates the structural and functional dynamics of synapses.

Credits

2

Instructor

Yi Zuo

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 280Z Prostate Development and Cancer Biology

Weekly research seminar covering gene regulation, cellular interactions, and stem cell behaviors in mammalian prostate development and prostate cancer progression.

Credits

2

Instructor

Zhu Wang

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll by the permission of the instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 288 Pedagogy in STEM

Prepares graduate students to help teach university science courses. Weekly class sessions include activities and interactive discussions of diverse modes of learning, diverse ways of teaching, peer instruction, assessment of learning, equity and inclusion, and professional ethics. Students also visit an active learning class and an active learning discussion section at UCSC, then write evaluations of the teaching strategies used in those classes. (Formerly Teaching Assistant Training.)

Credits

2

Instructor

Melissa Jurica, Susan Strome

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOL 289 Practice of Science

Examination of ethical and practical scientific issues, including the collection and treatment of data, attribution of credit, plagiarism, fraud, and peer review. Career issues, including how to apply for grants and positions in industry or academia, will be discussed.

Credits

5

Instructor

William Saxton

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200A, BIOL 200B, and BIOL 200C or permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates may enroll with permission of the instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 290 Career Planning

An important goal of graduate programs is to train students for diverse careers. Exposes molecular cell and developmental biology graduate students to diverse career options and helps them develop individual development plans to target their graduate training to their selected career goals.

Credits

2

Instructor

Needhi Bhalla

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

BIOL 291 Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology Seminar

Topics of current interest in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology are presented weekly by graduate students, faculty, and guest speakers.

Credits

2

Instructor

David Feldheim

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 292 MCD Seminar

Various topics by weekly guest speakers.

Credits

0

Instructor

David Feldheim

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 296 Laboratory Research in Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology

Independent laboratory research in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 297A Independent Study

Independent study for graduate students who have not yet settled on a research area for their thesis. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

BIOL 297B Independent Study

Independent study for graduate students who have not yet settled on a research area for their thesis. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

BIOL 297C Independent Study

Independent study for graduate students who have not yet settled on a research area for their thesis. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

BIOL 297F Independent Study

Independent study for graduate students who have not yet settled on a research area for their thesis. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOL 299A Thesis Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 299B Thesis Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 299C Thesis Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 299F Thesis Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BME 5 Introduction to Biotechnology

Introduces the tools and applications of biotechnology in the fields of medicine, agriculture, the environment, and industry.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Wendy Rothwell, Nader Pourmand

General Education Code

PE-T

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter

BME 18 Scientific Principles of Life

The principles of life as it exists on this planet and how they generalize. Darwinian evolution, genomes, scientific theories of life (mechanistic, thermodynamic, information theoretic). Future of life: Internet, machine learning and adaptation, artificial intelligence, genome editing, fully artificial life. Earth Sciences 7 is recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

Instructor

David Haussler, David Deamer

General Education Code

SI

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 21L Introduction to Basic Laboratory Techniques

Introduces students to basic laboratory techniques that are essential to begin work in faculty research labs and on capstone projects. Students have several independent blocks/fixed projects and learn how to use various instruments and techniques employed in biotechnology laboratories, such as: calibration and use of the pipette; making up various buffers; pH titration; Bactrial transformation; TAcloning; plasmid and DNA isolation; Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR); gel electrophoresis; Pyrosequencing; and an introduction to Linux for DNA sequence analysis. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nader Pourmand

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to bioengineering, bioinformatics, and biomolecular engineering and bioinformatics majors and proposed majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

BME 22L Foundations of Design and Experimentation in Molecular Biology, Part I

The first in a two-part series that includes BME 23L. Together these courses prepare bioengineering students for successful junior/senior year projects in faculty research laboratories, iGEM, or Senior Design. The focus is on molecular biology laboratory and introductory bioinformatics skills. Students will design and initiate an original metagenome study near the end of the term.

Credits

2

Instructor

M. Akeson

Requirements

Prerequisites: BME 21L and CHEM 1A, CHEM 1B, CHEM 1M, and CHEM 1N; or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to sophomores and juniors.

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 23L Foundations of Design and Experimentation in Molecular Biology, Part II

Continuation of BME 22L. Together these courses prepare bioengineering students for successful junior/senior year projects in faculty research laboratories, iGEM, or Senior Design. The focus is on molecular biology laboratory and introductory bioinformatics skills. Students will complete original metagenome and transcriptome studies.

Credits

2

Instructor

Akeson

Requirements

Prerequisites: BME 22L or by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 51A Applied Electronics for Bioengineers Part 1

Lab-based course that introduces measuring, modeling, and designing electronics circuits, emphasizing voltage dividers and complex impedance culminating in simple, negative-feedback op amp circuits for amplifying audio signals. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kevin Karplus

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MATH 19A; or MATH 11A by consent of instructor. High school physics recommended. Enrollment is restricted to bioengineering and biomolecular engineering & bioinformatics majors and proposed majors; other majors by consent.

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 51B Applied Electronics for Bioengineers Part 2

Lab-based course that introduces designing, measuring, and modeling electronics circuits, emphasizing RC filters and negative-feedback amplifiers for various sensors circuits for amplifying audio signals, design of multi-stage amplifiers, transimpedance amplifiers, instrumentation amplifiers, and class-D power amplifiers. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kevin Karplus

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BME 51A.

Quarter offered

Spring

BME 80G Bioethics in the 21st Century: Science, Business, and Society

Serves science and non-science majors interested in bioethics. Guest speakers and instructors lead discussions of major ethical questions having arisen from research in genetics, medicine, and industries supported by this knowledge.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

PHIL 80G

General Education Code

PE-T

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 80H The Human Genome

Course will focus on understanding human genes. Accessible to non-science majors. Will cover principles of human inheritance and techniques used in gene analysis. The evolutionary, social, ethical, and legal issues associated with knowledge of the human genome will be discussed.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Wendy Rothwell

General Education Code

PE-T

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring, Summer

BME 94 Group Tutorial

Provides a means for a small group of students to study a particular topic in consultation with a faculty sponsor. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 94F Group Tutorial

Provides a means for a small group of students to study a particular topic in consultation with a faculty sponsor. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 99 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 99F Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 105 Genetics in the Genomics Era

Principles of genetics and genomics focusing on how sequencing technologies enable us to understand gene function, genotype to phenotype relationships, and genetic inheritance.

Credits

5

Instructor

Angela Brooks

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOE 20B. Enrollment is restricted to bioengineering, biomolecular engineering and bioinformatics, and bioinformatics majors and proposed majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

BME 110 Computational Biology Tools

Hands-on lectures and laboratory geared to teach basic tools and skills used in computational biology (genome browsers, sequence database searching, motif analysis, multiple sequence alignment, gene finders, phylogenetics analysis, protein structure visualization, and others). Web-based tools/databases are used on student laptops. Open to all science students; no prior programming or Unix experience required.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Todd Lowe, Angela Brooks, Russell Corbett-Detig, Daniel Kim

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BME 105, or BIOL 100, or BIOL 105, or BIOC 100A, or CHEM 103, or declared Bioinformatics majors.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter

BME 122H Extreme Environmental Virology

Examines life in extreme environments with an emphasis on the viruses that live there. Integrates aspects of virology, molecular biology, and computational biology. Students investigate a high-salt, extreme environment at the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge, and use DNA extraction methods to find molecular evidence of the organisms that live there and describe the genetic content of viruses and the community living in those high-salt ponds.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, David Bernick

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to College Scholar Students, and or by permission of the instructor.

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 123T Senior Thesis Writing

For bioengineering senior thesis students, guidance in preparing a draft manuscript describing their senior research project. Students also practice conference-style oral or poster presentation. Enrollment is restricted to senior bioengineering majors.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kevin Karplus, Mark Akeson, Terry Terhaar

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BME 185 or CSE 185E. Concurrent enrollment in BME 193F orBME 195F or BME 198F or CSE 193F or CSE 195F or CSE 198F or ECE 193F or ECE 195F or ECE 198F is required.

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 128 Protein Engineering

For bioengineering, bioinformatics, and biology majors, focuses on engineering (i.e., changing) of proteins. Topics focus on practical aspects of protein engineering strategies that are crucial to modern biotechnology and biomedicinal applications.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Rebecca Dubois

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A; and BIOL 100 or BIOC 100A, or by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 128L Protein Engineering Laboratory

Students address a current scientific question about protein stability using structure-guided protein engineering. Specifically, Students use recombinant DNA technology to produce an engineered protein that is predicted to have enhanced stability. Students then assess its stability with differential scanning fluorimetry. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Rebecca Dubois

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOC 100A or BIOL 100; and BIOL 101L, BIOL 20L, or BME 21L. Previous or concurrent enrollment in BME 128 is required. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior bioengineering, bioinformatics, and biomolecular engineering and bioinformatics majors; other majors by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

BME 129A Project Design and Implementation in Biomolecular Engineering I

First of a three-part series focused on senior design projects in biomolecular engineering. In this first part, students examine experiments that elucidated the function of biological macromolecules at the Angstrom scale, and how technologies related to those functions were invented and implemented. Guided by these examples, each student develops a senior design project concept or small business proposal and defends its utility, plausibility, and inventiveness in a written document and an oral presentation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mark Akeson, Nader Pourmand

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOL 20B; and BIOL 100 or BIOC 100A; BME 51A recommended. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior bioengineering majors or by permission of the instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 129B Project Design and Implementation in Biomolecular Engineering II

Second part of a three-course sequence that is the culmination of the bioengineering program for students who chose a senior design group project to fulfill their capstone requirement. Students apply knowledge and skills gained in biomolecular engineering coursework to articulate, organize, and plan a senior design group project. Student groups complete research, specification, planning, and procurement for their project. Includes technical discussions, design reviews, and formal presentations. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

M. Akeson, R. Corbett-Detig

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BME 129A or BME 150. Enrollment is restricted to senior bioengineering majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 129C Project Design and Implementation in Biomolecular Engineering III

Final part of a three-course sequence that is the culmination of the bioengineering program for students who chose a senior design group project to fulfill their capstone requirement. Students apply knowledge and skills gained in biomolecular engineering coursework to articulate, organize, and plan a senior design group project. Student groups complete research, specification, planning, and procurement for their project. Includes technical discussions, design reviews, and formal presentations. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Bernick, M. Akeson, D.

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BME 129A and BME 129B. Enrollment is restricted to senior bioengineering majors.

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Spring

BME 130 Genomes

Advanced elective for biology majors, examining biology on the genome scale. Topics include genome sequencing; large scale computational and functional analysis; features specific to prokaryotic, eukaryotic, or mammalian genomes; proteomics; SNP analysis; medical genomics; and genome evolution.

Credits

5

Instructor

Richard Edward Green

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 100 or CHEM 103 or BIOC 100A; and BIOL 105 or BME 105; or approval of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 132 Evolutionary Genomics

Covers major recent advances in evolutionary genomics. Students learn to analyze and interpret scientific writing in depth. Students also present on work covered in the class and produce one research or review paper. Students cannot receive credit for this courses and course 232.

Credits

5

Instructor

Russell Corbett-Detig

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BME 105 or BIOL 105. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 140 Bioinstrumentation

Introduces the fundamental aspects of bioinstrumentation that are essential for beginning-level employment in clinical, pharmaceutical , and biotechnology laboratories. The advantages and disadvantages of several instruments are discussed and demonstrated, such as thermocycler, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), next-generation DNA sequencing platforms, pyrosequencing, fabless nanofabrication, ion-sensitive measurements, microarray fabrication, and fluorescent-activated cell sorter (FACS). Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nader Pourmand

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BME 5; or BME 51A and BME 51B; or EE 101 and EE 101L; or BIOL 100; or BIOC 100A.

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 160 Research Programming in the Life Sciences

No programming experience is required, but basic computer and molecular biology understanding is assumed. Students learn programming in Python to manipulate biological data. Programming assignments comprise the majority of the assignments, and a final project using skills developed in this course is required. Lab section registration is required. BioPython and other modules introduced for use in the final project.

Credits

6

Instructor

The Staff, David Bernick, Joshua Stuart

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A or BIOL 21A.

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring

BME 163 Applied Visualization and Analysis of Scientific Data

Python and its Numpy, Scipy, and Matplotlib packages as well as Inkscape are used on scientific data to generate publication-quality figures. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 263.

Credits

5

Instructor

Christopher Vollmers

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BME 160 or BME 205. Prerequisites can be waived in cases where students have the required programming skills. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

General Education Code

SR

Quarter offered

Spring

BME 175 Entrepreneurship in Biotechnology

Focuses on contemporary issues in commercializing biotechnology and genomics, emphasizing development of teamwork and communication skills. Topics include intellectual property management, fundraising, market analysis, and technology development as related to biotechnology start-ups. Students perform real-world tasks preparing for commercialization. Taught in conjunction with BME 275.

Credits

5

Instructor

Todd Lowe, Richard Edward Green

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 177 Engineering Stem Cells

For bioengineering students interested in stem cells. Class uses project-based learning to discuss basic stem cell concepts and past breakthrough approaches to identify and design solutions for technological hurdles in stem cell research.

Credits

5

Instructor

Shariati, C. Forsberg, D. Kim, A.

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BME 140 or BME 150, and BIOL 100, or by consent of instructor.

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Spring

BME 178 Stem Cell Biology

Basic concepts, experimental approaches, and therapeutic potential are discussed. Students gain experience in reading the primary scientific literature.

Credits

5

Instructor

Camilla Forsberg, Daniel Kim

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110; BIOL 115 recommended.

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 180 Professional Practice in Bioengineering

Seminar course where students develop a research proposal and the collaborative skills needed for independent research projects. Includes professional practice development in collaboration skills, project management, proposal development, and funding.

Credits

2

Instructor

The Staff, David Bernick

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): previous or concurrent enrollment in BME 185 or CSE 185E. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior bioengineering, biomolecular engineering and bioinformatics, and bioinformatics majors or by permission.

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 185 Technical Writing for Biomolecular Engineers

Writing by biomolecular engineers, not to general audiences, but to engineers, engineering managers, and technical writers. Exercises include job application and resume, library puzzle, graphics, laboratory protocols, document specification, progress report, survey article or research proposal, poster, and oral presentation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Joy Hagen, Kevin Karplus

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; previous or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 20L or BIOL 101L. Enrollment restricted to junior and senior biomolecular engineering, bioengineering, and bioinformatics majors.

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

BME 188A Synthetic Biology--Mentored Research A

Provides a multidisciplinary, collaborative research experience working on a project in synthetic biology. Working with one or more research faculty, student teams complete a substantial project. Multiple oral/written presentations are required, including a formal conference presentation. Prerequisite(s): course 180. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors. Enrollment is by instructor permission.

Credits

5

Instructor

David Bernick

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

BME 188B Synthetic Biology--Mentored Research B

The second course in the two-quarter series in synthetic biology research. It continues the collaborative research endeavor that began in course 188A. Multiple oral/written presentations are required, including a formal conference presentation. Prerequisite(s): course 188A. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors. Enrollment is by instructor permission.

Credits

5

Instructor

David Bernick

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Summer

BME 193 Field Study

Provides for individual programs of study with specific aims and academic objectives carried out under the direction of a BME faculty member and a willing sponsor at a field site, using resources not normally available on campus. Credit is based upon written and oral presentations demonstrating the achievement of the objectives of the course. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 193F Field Study

Provides for individual programs of study with specific aims and academic objectives carried out under the direction of a BME faculty member and a willing sponsor at a field site, using resources not normally available on campus. Credit is based upon written and oral presentations demonstrating the achievement of the objectives of the course. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 194 Group Tutorial

A program of study arranged between a group of students and a faculty member. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 194F Group Tutorial

A program of independent study arranged between a group of students and a faculty member. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 195 Senior Thesis Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 195F Senior Thesis or Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 198 Individual Study or Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 198F Individual Study or Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 199 Tutorial

For fourth-year students majoring in bioinformatics or bioengineering.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 201 Scientific Writing

Covers effective writing styles for scientific communication for bio-science and engineering graduate students. Covers instruction for writing grant applications, scientific manuscripts, and thesis proposals. Students practice by preparing, editing, and evaluating each of these documents.

Credits

3

Instructor

R.E. Green, J. Stuart

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 205 Bioinformatics Models and Algorithms

Covers bioinformatics models and algorithms: the use of computational techniques to convert the masses of information from biochemical experiments (DNA sequencing, DNA chips, and other high-throughput experimental methods) into useful information. Emphasis is on DNA and protein sequence alignment and analysis.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, David Bernick, Kevin Karplus

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Undergraduates may enroll with prerequisite(s): CSE 15; and CSE 107 or STAT 131; and BIOL 20A; and concurrent enrollment in BIOC 100A.

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 215 Applied Gene Technology

Detailed insight into the techniques and technological trends in genomics and transcriptomics, building the necessary foundations for further research in genetic association studies, population genetic association studies, population genetics, diagnostics, medicine, and drug development. Students should already have a deeper understanding of the basic tools of molecular biotechnology than acquired in introductory courses in biotechnology, biochemistry, and molecular biotechnology.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nader Pourmand

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

BME 229 Protein and Cell Engineering

Focuses on established and novel strategies for protein and cell engineering. Explores concepts, design, and practical applications of engineered proteins, cells, and organisms as research tools and in therapeutic applications. Recommended for graduate students with interests in bioengineering.

Credits

5

Instructor

Camilla Forsberg, Rebecca Dubois

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Undergraduates by permission of instructor.

BME 230A Introduction to Computational Genomics and Systems Biology

Introductory and intermediate-level topics in computational genomics, DNA and RNA sequence analysis, mapping, quantification, detection of variants and their associations with disease. Covers topics in machine-learning, probabilistic graphical models, gene regulatory network inference, and single cell analysis. Students conduct related independent research.

Credits

5

Instructor

Joshua Stuart, David Haussler, Benedict Paten

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BME 205. Enrollment is restricted to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 230B Advanced Computational Genomics and Systems Biology

Covers advanced topics in computational genomics, DNA and RNA sequence analysis, mapping, quantification, detection of variants and their associations with disease. Topics include machine-learning, probabilistic graphical models, gene regulatory network inference, and single cell analysis. Students participate in teams in a computational analysis competition.

Credits

5

Instructor

Joshua Stuart, David Haussler, Benedict Paten

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BME 230A. Enrollment is restricted to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

BME 232 Evolutionary Genomics

Covers major recent advances in evolutionary genomics. Students learn to analyze and interpret scientific writing in depth. Students also present on work covered in the class and produce one research or review paper. Students may not receive credit for this course and course 132.

Credits

5

Instructor

Russell Corbett-Detig

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. BME 105 or BIOL 105 or equivalent courses in higher-level genetic processes are highly recommended.

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 237 Applied RNA Bioinformatics

Teaches methods for RNA gene discovery; gene expression quantification; probabalistic modeling, secondary structure/trans-interaction prediction; mRNA splicing; and functional analysis. Emphasis on leveraging comparative genomics and employing high-throughput RNA sequencing data. Includes lectures, scientific literature discussion, problem sets, and final gene-discovery project.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Todd Lowe, Angela Brooks

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to seniors and graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

BME 263 Applied Visualization and Analysis of Scientific Data

Python and its Numpy, Scipy, and Matplotlib packages as well as Inkscape are used to generate publication quality figures from scientific data. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 163.

Credits

5

Instructor

Christopher Vollmers

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BME 160 or BME 205. Prerequisite(s) can be waived in cases where students have required programming skills. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

BME 272 Precision Medicine

Focuses on modern "precision" approaches to understanding human health, where every patient is unique. Explores basic and clinical discoveries and 'omics-based medicine for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Emphasis is on genomic approaches and applications to cancer.

Credits

5

Instructor

D. Kim

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 275 Entrepreneurship in Biotechnology

Focuses on contemporary issues in commercializing biotechnology and genomics, emphasizing development of teamwork and communication skills. Topics include intellectual property management, fundraising, market analysis, and technology development as related to biotechnology start-ups. Students perform real-world tasks preparing for commercialization. Taught in conjunction with Biomolecular Engineering 175.

Credits

5

Instructor

Todd Lowe, Richard Edward Green

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 280B Seminar on Bioinformatics and Bioengineering

Weekly seminar series covering topics of current research in computational biology, and bioinformatics. Current research work and literature in these areas are discussed.(Formerly Seminar on Bioinformatics.)

Credits

2

Instructor

C. Forsberg, J. Stuart, R.E. Green, A. Brooks, D. Kim

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 281A Seminar on Processive Enzymes and Nanopores

Weekly seminar series covering experimental research in nanopore technology and single-molecule analysis of polymerase function. Current research work and literature is discussed. Students lead some discussions and participate in all meetings.

Credits

2

Instructor

Mark Akeson

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 281C Seminar in Cancer Genomics

Presents current computational biology research to identify genomics-based signatures of cancer onset, progression, and treatment response. Examples of such investigations include: genetic pathway interpretation of multivariate high-throughput datasets; discovery of mutations in whole-genome sequence; identifications and quantification of gene isoforms, alleles, and copy number variants; and machine-learning tools to predict clinical outcomes. Students present their own research, host journal clubs, and attend lectures and teleconferences to learn about research conducted by national and international projects.

Credits

2

Instructor

Joshua Stuart, David Haussler

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BME 281D Seminar on Protein Engineering

Weekly seminar series covering experimental research in protein structure, function, and engineering. Current research work and literature in this area are discussed. Students lead some discussions and participate in all meetings.

Credits

2

Instructor

Rebecca Dubois

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 281E Seminar in Genomics

Current topics in genomics including high-throughput sequencing, genome assembly, and comparative genomics. Students design and implement independent research projects. Weekly laboratory meetings are held to discuss these projects and related research in the field.

Credits

2

Instructor

Richard Edward Green

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 281F Blood Cell Development

Weekly seminar covering topics in current research on blood cell development and stem cell biology. Current research and literature in these areas discussed. Students lead some discussions and participate in all meetings.

Credits

2

Instructor

Camilla Forsberg

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 281H Seminar in Comparative Genomics

Weekly seminar series covering topics of current computational and experimental research in comparative genomics. Current research work and literature in this area discussed. Students lead some discussions and participate in all meetings.

Credits

2

Instructor

David Haussler

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 281J Seminar in Computational Genomics and Biomedicine

Research seminar of the UCSC Computational Genomic Laboratory and Platform Teams (cgl.genomics.ucsc.edu/). Topics include genomic and transcriptomic sequence analysis methods, comparative and evolutionary genomics, big-data genomic analysis, biomedical data sharing, and precision medicine.

Credits

2

Instructor

Benedict Paten

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BME 281L Seminar in Computational Genetics

Weekly seminar series covering topics and experimental research in computational genetics. Current research work and literature in this area discussed. Students lead some discussions and participate in all meetings.

Credits

2

Instructor

Todd Lowe

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 281N Seminar in Transcriptomics

Covers current topics in computational and experimental research in transcriptomics. Current research work and literature discussed. Weekly laboratory meetings held to discuss these projects and related research in the field.

Credits

2

Instructor

Angela Brooks

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 281P Seminar on Nanotechnology and Biosensors

Weekly seminar covering topics of research in the development of new tools and technologies to detect and study genes and proteins. Latest research work and literature in these areas are discussed. Students lead some discussions and participate in all meetings.

Credits

2

Instructor

Nader Pourmand

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 281R Seminar in Stem Cell Genomics

Weekly seminar series covering topics in research on stem cell genomics. Current research and literature in this area is discussed. Students lead some discussions and participate in all meetings.

Credits

2

Instructor

Daniel Kim

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with instructor permission.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 281S Seminar in Computational Functional Genomics

Weekly seminar series covering topics of current computational and experimental research in computational functional genomics. Current research work and literature in this area discussed. Students lead some discussions and participate in all meetings.

Credits

2

Instructor

Joshua Stuart

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 281V Immunogenomics Seminar

Journal club and research presentations in immunogenomics. Enrollment is by consent of the instructor and is restricted to graduate students, juniors, and seniors.

Credits

2

Instructor

Christopher Vollmers

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 281Z Seminar in Population and Evolutionary Genomics

Covers major recent topics in evolutionary and population genomics. Consists primarily of discussions of recent literature and updates on group members' research. Enrollment is available only to members of the Corbett-Detig laboratory.

Credits

2

Instructor

Russell Corbett-Detig

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 293 Seminar in Biomolecular Engineering

Weekly seminar series covering topics of bioinformatics and biomolecular engineering research. Current research work and literature in this area discussed. Students lead some discussions and participate in all meetings.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

BME 296 Research in Bioinformatics

Independent research in bioinformatics under faculty supervision. Although this course may be repeated for credit, not every degree program accepts a repeated course towards degree requirements. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 297A Independent Study or Research

Independent study or research under faculty supervision. Although course may be repeated for credit, not every degree program accepts a repeated course towards degree requirements. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 297B Independent Study or Research

Independent study or research under faculty supervision. Although course may be repeated for credit, not every degree program accepts a repeated course towards degree requirements. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 297C Independent Study or Research

Independent study or research under faculty supervision. Although course may be repeated for credit, not every degree program accepts a repeated course towards degree requirements. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

BME 297F Independent Study or Research

Independent study or research under faculty supervision. Although course may be repeated for credit, not every degree program accepts a repeated course towards degree requirements. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BME 299A Thesis Research

Thesis research conducted under faculty supervision. Although course may be repeated for credit, not every degree program accepts a repeated course towards degree requirements.Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 299B Thesis Research

Thesis research conducted under faculty supervision. Although course may be repeated for credit, not every degree program accepts a repeated course towards degree requirements.Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 299C Thesis Research

Thesis research conducted under faculty supervision. Although course may be repeated for credit, not every degree program accepts a repeated course towards degree requirements.Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 1A General Chemistry

An integrated study of general chemistry. Covers a range of topics including the atomic structure of matter; molecules; chemical reactions; acids and bases; gases; and equilibria in the gas and liquid phase. Students are expected to use algebra to solve problems. General Chemistry is articulated in a full-year series. Partial transfer credit is not allowed for the A,B,C series.

Credits

5

Instructor

P. Weiss, A. Eroy-Reveles, S. Rubin, S. Oliver

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in MATH 3 (or equivalent), or a mathematics placement score of 300 or higher; taking the online chemistry self-assessment exam is strongly recommended.

General Education Code

SI

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

CHEM 1B General Chemistry

An integrated study of general chemistry. Coverage includes quantum mechanics; the hydrogen atom; many-electron atoms and chemical periodicity; elementary covalent bonding; transition metals; and chemical kinetics. Prerequisite(s): Strong high-school level chemistry is strongly recommended; taking the online chemistry self-assessment examination is strongly recommended. Concurrent enrollment in course 1M is recommended. General Chemistry is articulated in a full-year series. Partial transfer credit is not allowed for the A,B,C series.

Credits

5

Instructor

W. Scott, J. Zhang, G. Millhauser

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

CHEM 1C General Chemistry

An integrated study of general chemistry. Coverage includes thermodynamics; oxidation-reduction and electrochemistry; liquids and solids; intermolecular forces and solutions, including colligative properties; and nuclear chemistry. General Chemistry is articulated in a full-year series. Partial transfer credit is not allowed for the A,B,C series.

Credits

5

Instructor

P. Weiss, J. Benjamin

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1A. Concurrent enrollment in course 1N is recommended.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

CHEM 1M General Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory sequence illustrating topics covered in courses 1B and 1C and important experimental techniques. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Randa Roland

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 1B is required.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

CHEM 1N General Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory sequence illustrating topics covered in courses 1B-1C, respectively, and important experimental techniques. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Randa Roland

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 1C is required.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

CHEM 8A Organic Chemistry

Introduces organic chemistry, with an emphasis on bonding and reactivity of organic compounds. (Formerly course 108A.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Lokey, Caitlin Binder

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1B and CHEM 1C.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Summer

CHEM 8B Organic Chemistry

Introduction to organic chemistry, with an emphasis on reactivity and synthesis of organic compounds. (Formerly course 108B.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Bakthan Singaram, Rebecca Braslau

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 8A.

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring, Summer

CHEM 8L Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory experience in organic chemistry associated with course 8A. Designed to introduce the student to the many techniques associated with organic chemistry while affording an opportunity to explore the concepts discussed in the lecture material. Laboratory: 4 hours, lecture: 1-1/4 hours. Students are billed a materials fee. (Formerly course 108L.)

Credits

2

Instructor

Caitlin Binder

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1C and CHEM 1N and previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 8A is required.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Summer

CHEM 8M Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory experience in organic chemistry associated with course 8B. Designed to introduce the student to the many techniques associated with organic chemistry while affording an opportunity to explore the concepts discussed in the lecture material. Laboratory: 4 hours, lecture: 1-1/4 hours. Students are billed a materials fee.(Formerly course 108M.)

Credits

2

Instructor

Caitlin Binder

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 8A and CHEM 8L and previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 8B is required.

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring, Summer

CHEM 8N Honors Organic Chemistry Lab

Honors laboratory experience in organic chemistry associated with course CHEM 8B. Designed to introduce the exceptional student to many of the techniques associated with organic chemistry while taking part in an active organic chemistry research experience. Laboratory: 6 hours per week minimum. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 8A and CHEM 8L; concurrent enrollment in CHEM 8B is required. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor. Students must pass safety training to begin research. Students may only receive credit for one of the following: 8M or 8N. This class may only be taken as Pass/No Pass, which cannot be converted to a letter grade.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): courses 8A and 8L concurrent enrollment in 8B is required.

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring

CHEM 80H Introduction to Wine Science and Chemistry

A glimpse of the science and technology of wines through critical analysis. Students gain an appreciation of the scientific method and are be exposed to data from chemistry, biology, viticulture, and enology. This analysis is extended to examine commonly accepted practices used by scientists vs. non-scientist to assess and describe wine quality. (Formerly Introduction to Wines and Wine Chemistry.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Philip Crews

General Education Code

SI

CHEM 99 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 99F Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 103 Biochemistry

Introduction to biochemistry including biochemical molecules, protein structure and function, membranes, bioenergetics, and regulation of biosynthesis. Provides students with basic essentials of modern biochemistry. Students who plan to do advanced work in biochemistry and molecular biology should take the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BIOC) 100 series. Students cannot receive credit for this course after they have completed any two courses from the BIOC 100A, 100B, and 100C sequence.

Credits

5

Instructor

N. Stone

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 8B.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 109 Intermediate Organic Chemistry and Applications to Biology

Integrated study of fundamental organic chemistry, with emphasis on materials especially relevant to biological sciences.

Credits

3

Instructor

Caitlin Binder

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 8B or equivalent.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 110 Intermediate Organic Chemistry with Emphasis on Synthesis and Analytical Methods

An intermediate study of organic chemistry, including synthetic methods, reaction mechanisms, and application of synthetic chemistry techniques.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jevgenij Raskatov

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 8B. Enrollment is restricted to chemistry majors, minors and proposed majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 110L Intermediate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory experience in organic chemistry and associated principles. Experiments involve the preparation, purification, characterization, and identification of organic compounds, and make use of modern as well as classical techniques. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Caitlin Binder

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 8M and previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 110.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 110N Honors Organic Chemistry Lab

Honors laboratory experience in organic chemistry associated with CHEM 109 or CHEM 110. Designed to introduce the exceptional student to many of the techniques associated with organic chemistry while taking part in an active organic chemistry research experience. Laboratory: 6 hours per week minimum. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 8A, CHEM 8B and CHEM 8L and either CHEM 8M or CHEM 8N and and previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 109 or CHEM 110 is required. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor. Students must pass safety training to begin research. Students may only receive credit for one of the following: CHEM 110L, or CHEM 110N. This class may only be taken as Pass/No Pass, which cannot be converted to a letter grade.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): courses 8A, 8B and 8L and either 8M or 8N and and  previous or concurrent enrollment in 109 or 110  is required

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 122 Principles of Instrumental Analysis

A laboratory course designed to develop familiarity with techniques and instrumentation used in analytical chemistry, emphasizing determination of trace inorganic species. Primary emphasis on applications utilizing the absorption or emission of electromagnetic radiation and on voltammetry. Topics include molecular UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectrometry; atomic absorption, emission and fluorescence spectrometry; and various forms of voltammetry. Lecture: 2 hours; laboratory: 8 hours. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

P. Mascharak

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 110 and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior chemistry (B.S.) majors.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 143 Organic Chemical Structure and Reactions

Advanced topics such as the chemistry of terpenes, steroids, synthetic polymers, alkaloids, reactive intermediates, and reaction mechanisms are treated. Lecture: 4 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Bakthan Singaram

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 110.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 144 Catalysis In Organic Synthesis Using Metals and Metalloids Based Reagents

Designed to introduce Junior/Senior undergraduates to the field of catalysis in organic synthesis. Course acquaints students with the chemistry, with relevant techniques of metals and metalloid chemistry, and focuses on new advancements in organoborane field. Also provides knowledge of the methods to use chemistry to address synthetic challenges in organic chemistry. Students become familiar with the concepts and approaches in the current field of chemical biology.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 110

Quarter offered

Winter

CHEM 146A Advanced Laboratory in Organic Chemistry

Exposes students to advanced laboratory techniques in organic chemistry. Designed for students without previous research background in organic chemistry. Experiments carry a research-like format and cover the areas of natural products and reaction chemistry. Modern methods of organic analysis are emphasized including chromatographic methods and organic structure determination by spectroscopy. Laboratory: 8 hours. Students billed a materials fee.

Credits

3

Instructor

Caitlin Binder

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 110 and CHEM 110L; satisfaction of Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to chemistry majors. Minors by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 146B Advanced Laboratory in Inorganic Chemistry

Designed to expose students to advanced synthetic and spectroscopic techniques in inorganic chemistry. Examples include anaerobic manipulations, characterization of inorganic materials through spectral assignments and synthesis of coordination and organometallic complexes. Lecture: 1-1/4 hours; laboratory: 8 hours. Students billed a materials fee.

Credits

3

Instructor

Theodore Holman

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 151A and CHEM 151L; CHEM 163A; satisfaction of Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment restricted to chemistry majors. Minors by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 146C Advanced Laboratory in Physical Chemistry

Provides advanced laboratory experience in the areas of nanomaterial synthesis and characterization; spectroscopy; fabrication and measurements energy-conversion devices; and soft lithography techniques and instrumentation. Lecture: 1-1/4 hours; laboratory: 4 hours. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

3

Instructor

Yat Li

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 163B and CHEM 164; satisfaction of Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment restricted to chemistry majors. Minors by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 151A Chemistry of Metals

Fundamental topics of inorganic chemistry are presented at the level of the standard texts of field. Special emphasis is given to maintain breadth in the areas of metallic, nonmetallic, and biological aspects of inorganic chemistry. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; discussion: 1-1/4 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Theodore Holman

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 8B and CHEM 8M and CHEM 163A. Concurrent enrollment in course 151L is required.

Quarter offered

Winter

CHEM 151B Chemistry of the Main Group Elements

Fundamental aspects of inorganic chemistry of main group elements are discussed. The emphasis is placed on the chemistry of nontransition elements including noble gases and halogens. In addition, students are exposed to the concepts of extended structures, new materials, and solid-state chemistry. Lecture: 3-3/4 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Scott Oliver

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 8B and CHEM 8M and CHEM 163A. Recommended for chemistry majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 151L Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory experience in inorganic chemistry. Experiments involve the preparation, purification, and characterization of inorganic compounds. In addition, experiments are designed to illustrate fundamental principles in inorganic chemistry and are coordinated with lectures in course 151A. Laboratory: 4 hours per week. Laboratory lecture: 1 1/4 hours per week. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Theodore Holman

Requirements

Prerequisite(s):CHEM 8B and CHEM 8M and CHEM 163A. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 151A is required.

Quarter offered

Winter

CHEM 156C Materials Chemistry

Advanced topics in inorganic chemistry and an introduction to solid-state chemistry. Synthesis and structure of materials discussed as well as their influence on properties for modern devices and applications. Recent developments in area of material science also explored. Taught in conjunction with course 256C. (Formerly Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Scott Oliver

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 151A. Enrollment is restricted to seniors.

CHEM 163A Quantum Mechanics and Basic Spectroscopy

A detailed introduction to quantum theory and the application of wave mechanics to problems of atomic structure, bonding in molecules, and fundamentals of spectroscopy.

Credits

5

Instructor

Yuan Ping

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1B and CHEM 1C; PHYS 5A, PHYS 5B, and PHYS 5C or PHYS 6A, PHYS 6B, and PHYS 6C; and MATH 22 or MATH 23B. PHYS 6C can be taken concurrently.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 163B Chemical Thermodynamics

Fundamentals of thermodynamics and applications to chemical and biochemical equilibria. (Formerly Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Alex Ayzner

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1B and CHEM 1C, PHYS 6A or PHYS 5A, and MATH 22 or MATH 23B.

Quarter offered

Winter

CHEM 163C Statistical Thermodynamics and Kinetics

Statistical mechanics, kinetic theory, and reaction kinetics and topics in spectroscopy. (Formerly Kinetic Theory and Reaction Kinetics, Statistical Mechanics, Spectroscopic Applications.)

Credits

5

Instructor

E. Switkes

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 163A and CHEM 163B.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 164 Physical Chemistry Laboratory

Provides laboratory experience and data analysis in the areas of thermodynamics, kinetics, and spectroscopy. Lecture: 1.75 hours; experimental laboratory: 4 hours; computer laboratory: 2 hours. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Yat Li

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1B and CHEM 1C; and PHYS 5A and PHYS 5B and PHYS 5C, or PHYS 6A and PHYS 6B and PHYS 6C; and MATH 22 or MATH 23B. CHEM 163A is recommended.

Quarter offered

Winter

CHEM 169 Chemistry and Biology of Drug Design and Discovery

An overview of the central elements of drug discovery, including target selection and validation; computational or virtual screening; high-throughput screening; fragment-based methods; and pharmacokinetics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Lokey

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 103 or BIOC 100A.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 171 Chemical Biology

Covers methods and techniques for the field of chemical biology. Brings together methods in chemistry, biochemistry, and genetics to study the interaction of small molecules with biological systems. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course CHEM 271.

Credits

5

Instructor

John MacMillan

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 103 and CHEM 143. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior chemistry and biochemistry majors and minors.

Quarter offered

Winter

CHEM 192 Dir Stu Teach

Dir Stu Teach

Credits

5

CHEM 194 Senior Essay

An individually supervised course with emphasis on reviewing the current scientific literature. Students are required to submit a summary and a critique of a scientific paper in the form of a senior essay. Students submit a petition to the sponsoring agency. This course may not be repeated for credit.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 195A Senior Research

An individually supervised course with emphasis on independent research. Multiple-term course extending over two or three quarters; the grade and evaluation submitted for the final quarter apply to all previous quarters. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency; may not be repeated for credit.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 195B Senior Research

An individually supervised course with emphasis on independent research. Multiple-term course extending over two or three quarters; the grade and evaluation submitted for the final quarter apply to all previous quarters. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency; may not be repeated for credit.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 195C Senior Thesis

An individually supervised course with emphasis on independent research. Multiple-term course extending over two or three quarters; the grade and evaluation submitted for the final quarter apply to all previous quarters. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency; may not be repeated for credit. (Formerly Senior Research.)

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 199 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 199F Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 200A Advanced Biochemistry: Biophysical Methods

An introduction to the theory, principles, and practical application of biophysical methods to the study of biomolecules, especially proteins and nucleic acids. Emphasis on spectroscopic techniques. Topics include magnetic resonance, optical spectroscopy, fast reaction techniques, crystallography, and mass spectrometry.

Credits

5

Instructor

S. Rubin

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 200B Advanced Biochemistry: Macromolecular Structure and Function

A detailed discussion of nucleic acid and protein chemistry, ranging from the structure, thermodynamics, and folding to the relationship between structure and function, and encompassing the methods used to determine such information. (Formerly Advanced Biochemistry: Protein Structure and Function.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Nikolaos Sgourakis

Quarter offered

Winter

CHEM 200C Advanced Biochemistry: Enzyme Mechanisms and Kinetics

A study of enzyme kinetics, mechanisms, and factors involved in enzymic catalysis. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours. (Formerly course 231, Enzyme Mechanisms and Kinetics.)

Credits

5

Instructor

William Scott

CHEM 222 Career Success in Industrial Science/ Engineering

Provides skills for the transition from academia into industrial research careers, addressing presentation skills, project prioritization, teamwork, salary-benefit expectations, intellectual property, performance reviews, Myers-Briggs profiles, and career planning. Participant teams will analyze the commercialization of a technical innovation.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to Physical and Biological Sciences and School of Engineering graduate students who have completed one consecutive year. Undergraduates may enroll on a space available basis by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 230 Grant Writing in Biomedical Research

Introduces the fundamentals of grant writing in biomedical research, including best practices for presentation of data and communication of research findings. Students write and peer-edit most components of the NIH Ruth L. Kirschstein F31 predoctoral fellowship. Course is designed for students in their second year or later of graduate study.

Credits

5

Instructor

Carrie Partch

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 234 Bioinorganic Chemistry

The role played by transition metals in biological systems is discussed through application of the principles of coordination chemistry and inorganic spectroscopy. Topics include metalloproteins involved in oxygen binding, iron storage, biological redox reactions, and nitrogen fixation, as well as metal complexes of nucleic acids. Lecture: 4 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Pradip Mascharak

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 151A, CHEM 151L, CHEM 163A, and BIOC 100A; or graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 238 Topics in Biophysical Chemistry

A discussion of the application of selected topics in biophysical chemistry to contemporary problems in biochemistry and molecular biology. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

CHEM 242A Modern Physical Organic Chemisty

Covers molecular structure and bonding, strain, and non-covalent binding forces. Other topics include acid-base chemistry, kinetics, thermodynamics, catalysis, organic reactions and mechanism, and quantum mechanical approaches to the analysis of organic molecules.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jevgenij Raskatov

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to seniors who have taken CHEM 143, and graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

CHEM 242B Modern Synthetic Methods in Organic Chemistry

Presents concepts in bond formation, conformation, selectivity, and stereocontrol in modern organic synthesis. Focuses on understanding reaction mechanisms. Culminates with strategy in designing multi-step synthesis of complex targets.

Credits

5

Instructor

Rebecca Braslau

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to seniors who have taken CHEM 143, and graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 242C Spectroscopy and Applied Analytical Methods

Presents strategies in organic structure elucidation, including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry. Provides theory and practical elements of structure elucidation and modern analytical methods for organic molecules.

Credits

5

Instructor

John MacMillan

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to seniors who have taken CHEM 143, and graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 244 Organic Free Radical Chemistry

Explores organic free radicals. Fundamental principles in physical chemistry provide an understanding of free-radical transformations in organic synthesis, polymerization, and some examples of free radicals in biology. For students who have a firm grounding in organic chemistry.

Credits

5

Instructor

Rebecca Braslau

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

CHEM 256A Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Advanced topics in inorganic chemistry are presented. Topics covered vary from year to year, and are announced in advance. Possible topics include A) organometallic chemistry; B) structural methods in inorganic chemistry; C) solid-state chemistry.

Credits

5

Instructor

Scott Oliver

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students or previous enrollment in CHEM 151A, CHEM 151L, and CHEM 146B.

Quarter offered

Winter

CHEM 256B Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Advanced topics in inorganic chemistry are presented. Topics covered vary from year to year, and are announced in advance. Possible topics include A) organometallic chemistry; B) structural methods in inorganic chemistry; C) solid-state chemistry.

Credits

5

Instructor

Theodore Holman

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students or previous enrollment in CHEM 151A, CHEM 151L, and CHEM 146B.

CHEM 256C Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Advanced topics in inorganic chemistry are presented. Topics covered vary from year to year, and are announced in advance. Possible topics include A) organometallic chemistry; B) structural methods in inorganic chemistry; C) solid-state chemistry.

Credits

5

Instructor

Scott Oliver

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students or previous enrollment in CHEM 151A, CHEM 151L, and CHEM 146B.

CHEM 256D X-ray Crystallography

Course in chemical crystallography focuses on the needs of small-molecule, single-crystal diffraction studies. Includes diffraction theory, space-group analysis, data collection, structure solution, and refinement. Practical component: use of diffraction equipment and solution/refinement software.

Credits

5

Instructor

Timothy Johnstone

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students and seniors who have taken CHEM 151A, CHEM 151L, and CHEM 163A.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 261 Foundations of Spectroscopy

The basic theory of time-dependent processes is covered at an advanced level. The interaction of electromagnetic radiation and matter is described using both semiclassical and quantum field formulations. A variety of modern spectroscopic techniques are discussed both in terms of the basic processes and their use in the elucidation of chemical structure and dynamics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jin Zhang

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to chemistry graduate students or previous enrollment in CHEM 163A.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 262 Statistical Mechanics

Theory and concepts of statistical mechanics with applications to ideal gases, condensed systems, phase transition, and non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ilan Benjamin

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to chemistry graduate students or previous enrollment in CHEM 163A.

CHEM 263 Quantum Mechanics

A rigorous introductory course: the Schrödinger equation, operator formalism, matrix mechanics, angular momentum, and spin. Perturbation and other approximate methods. Applications to atomic and molecular problems. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Yuan Ping

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to chemistry graduate students or previous enrollment in CHEM 163A, PHYS 116A, and PHYS 116B.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 265 Computer Simulation in Statistical Mechanics

A detailed introduction of the use of computer simulation methods in physical and biophysical chemistry. Includes review of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, and Monte-Carlo methods. Applications to liquid structure, reaction dynamics, and protein dynamics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ilan Benjamin

CHEM 266A Lasers and Their Chemical Applications

Introduces the basic theoretical principles of lasers and laser light. Various types of lasers and selected applications to chemistry are discussed. The use of lasers in photochemistry, spectroscopy, chemical kinetics, and chemical analysis is considered. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 163A and PHYS 114A and PHYS 114B.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 268 Solid State and Materials Chemistry

Topics include synthesis of solid-state materials and their characterization using experimental techniques: XRD, TEM spectroscopy, NMR, and their applications in technologies. Emphasis on new materials, e.g., polymer, biopolymers, nanomaterials, organic/inorganic composites, ceramics, superconductors, electronic, magnetic, and opto-electronic materials.

Credits

5

Instructor

Yat Li

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to chemistry graduate students or students previously enrolled in CHEM 163A and CHEM 163B.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 269 Electrochemistry

Designed to introduce basic principles and applications of electrochemistry to students at upper undergraduate and lower graduate levels in various fields including analytical, physical, and materials chemistry.

Credits

5

Instructor

Shaowei Chen

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to seniors and graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 271 Chemical Biology

Methods and techniques for the field of chemical biology. Brings together methods in chemistry, biochemistry, and genetics to study the interaction of small molecules with biological systems. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 171.

Credits

5

Instructor

John MacMillan

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to chemistry graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

CHEM 274 Proseminar in Synthetic and Polymer Chemistry

Weekly meetings devoted to study of synthetic organic chemistry and controlled polymer design for applications in nanotechnology. Topics drawn from current literature and research interests of participants.

Credits

5

Instructor

Rebecca Braslau

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 275 Proseminar in Biological Inorganic Chemistry

Weekly meetings devoted to biological inorganic chemistry and biochemistry. Topics are drawn from current literature. Papers and reviews are discussed, and participants give short seminars on their research interests.

Credits

5

Instructor

Theodore Holman

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 280 Proseminar in Materials Chemistry

Weekly meetings devoted to materials and inorganic research. Topics are drawn from current literature. Papers and reviews are discussed. Participants also give short seminars on topics of their research interests.

Credits

5

Instructor

Scott Oliver

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 282 Proseminar: Synthetic Methods

Weekly meetings devoted to the study of asymmetric and/or enantio-selective synthesis of optically active organic compounds of biological and medicinal significance. Topics drawn from the current literature and the research interests of the participants.

Credits

5

Instructor

Bakthan Singaram

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 284 Proseminar in Synthetic Organic Chemistry

Weekly meetings devoted to the study of synthetic organic chemistry. Topics drawn from the current literature and the research interests of the participants.

Credits

5

Instructor

Joseph Konopelski

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 285 Proseminar: Photobiochemistry and Photobiology

A detailed study of molecular mechanisms of light energy conversion and light-signal transduction processes in biological systems. Student participation in critical discussion of current literature examples are emphasized. Two-hour lecture and two-hour seminar weekly.

Credits

5

Instructor

Roberto Bogomolni

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 286 Proseminar in Natural Products Chemistry

Weekly meetings devoted to the study of natural products. Topics drawn from the current literature and research interests of the participants.

Credits

5

Instructor

Philip Crews

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 288 Proseminar in Bioinorganic Chemistry

Weekly meetings devoted to inorganic and bioinorganic research. Topics are drawn from current literature. Papers and reviews are discussed. Participants also give short seminars on topics of their research interests.

Credits

5

Instructor

Pradip Mascharak

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 291 Chemistry and Biochemistry Research Seminar

A weekly chemistry and biochemistry seminar series covering recent developments and current research, led by experts from other institutions, as well as local speakers. Open to chemistry and biochemistry graduate students.

Credits

5

Instructor

T. Johnstone

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 292 Seminar

Credits

2

Instructor

S. McKinnie

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students or approval of the graduate adviser.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 296 Teaching Chemistry

University-level pedagogy in chemistry; examines the role of preparation, assessment, and feedback in teaching chemistry discussion and laboratory sections. Effective classroom techniques and organizational strategies discussed; oral presentations analyzed critically. Required of entering chemistry graduate students.

Credits

2

Instructor

Randa Roland

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to chemistry graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 297A Independent Study

A topic will be studied with faculty tutorial assistance to satisfy a need for the student when a regular course is not available. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 297B Independent Study

A topic will be studied with faculty tutorial assistance to satisfy a need for the student when a regular course is not available. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 299A Thesis Research

Thesis Research

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 299B Thesis Research

Thesis Research

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 299C Thesis Research

Thesis Research

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHIN 1 First-Year Chinese

Instruction in elementary spoken and written Chinese (Mandarin), beginning with the sounds of Chinese and their representation in the pinyin romanization system. Conversation, structural analysis, and an introduction to character texts. The first-year sequence (1-2-3) begins only in the fall quarter. Students interested in learning Chinese who are uncertain about where they should enter the sequence should meet with the instructor prior to the first class meeting. (Formerly Instruction in the Chinese (Mandarin) Language.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Quarter offered

Fall

CHIN 2 First-Year Chinese

Continuation of Chinese 1, which assumes that students are familiar both with the pinyin romanization system and approximately 150 basic characters. (Formerly Instruction in the Chinese (Mandarin) Language.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHIN 1 or by consent of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter

CHIN 3 First-Year Chinese

Continuation of Chinese 2, which assumes that students are familiar both with the pinyin romanization system and approximately 300 basic characters. (Formerly Instruction in the Chinese (Mandarin) Language.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHIN 2 or by consent of instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHIN 4 Second-Year Chinese

Instruction in intermediate spoken and written Chinese (Mandarin). Conversation, composition, and the reading of modern texts. The second-year sequence (4-5-6) begins only in the fall quarter. (Formerly Intermediate Chinese (Mandarin).)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHIN 3 or by consent of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHIN 4H Accelerated Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Intensive instruction in spoken and written Chinese for heritage students whose limited proficiency in Mandarin or limited familiarity with characters requires an accelerated review of the sounds, sentence patterns, and basic vocabulary before joining the Chinese sequence above the elementary level. Students who successfully complete Chinese 4H proceed to Chinese 5. Enrollment by instructor consent.

Credits

5

CHIN 5 Second-Year Chinese

Continuation of Chinese 4. Conversation, composition, and the reading of modern texts. (Formerly Intermediate Chinese (Mandarin).)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHIN 4 or CHIN 4H or by consent of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter

CHIN 5H Accelerated Chinese for Heritage Speakers

Intensive instruction in spoken and written Chinese for heritage students whose limited proficiency in Mandarin or limited familiarity with characters requires an accelerated review of the sounds, sentence patterns, and basic vocabulary before joining the Chinese sequence above the elementary level. Students who successfully complete Chinese 5H proceed to Chinese 6.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHIN 4H or by consent of instructor.

CHIN 6 Second-Year Chinese

Continuation of Chinese 5. Conversation, composition, and the reading of modern texts. (Formerly Intermediate Chinese (Mandarin).)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHIN 5 or CHIN 5H or by consent of instructor.

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring

CHIN 94 Group Tutorial

Provides a means for a small group of students to study a particular topic in consultation with a faculty sponsor. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHIN 99 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHIN 99F Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHIN 103 Advanced Chinese: Language and Society

Designed to enhance the students' ability to understand, analyze, and discuss authentic Chinese reading materials. Chinese linguistic and cultural aspects are introduced. (Formerly Advanced Chinese.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHIN 6 or by consent of instructor.

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Fall

CHIN 104 Advanced Chinese: Readings in Literature

Close readings in Chinese vernacular literature of recognized merit from contemporary and modern writers as wells as from models from the traditional period. Student are introduced to the basic critical issues, in Chinese, relating to narrative and drama, revealed by the works under discussion.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHIN 103 or CHIN 105 or CHIN 107 or CHIN 108; or by consent of instructor.

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Winter

CHIN 105 Advanced Chinese: Readings in History

Offers an appreciation of some of the central issues in Chinese history as defined by Chinese historians of the 20th century. Through readings of graduated difficulty, the vocabulary, style, and form of modern Chinese historical writing are introduced.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHIN 103 or CHIN 104 or CHIN 107 or CHIN 108; or by consent of instructor.

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Spring

CHIN 107 Introduction to Classical Chinese Prose

Introduces the grammar and lexicon of classical Chinese and the language of China's pre-modern canonical writings in philosophy, religion, history, music, visual art, and literature. Reading from the Han and pre-Han era is featured. (Formerly Introduction to Classical Chinese.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHIN 103 or CHIN 104 or CHIN 105 or CHIN 108; or by consent of instructor.

General Education Code

TA

CHIN 108 Introduction to Classical Chinese Poetry

Introduces the grammar and lexicon of classical Chinese and the language of China's pre-modern canonical writings in philosophy, religion, history, music, visual art, and literature. Classical poetry and lyrics are featured.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHIN 103 or CHIN 104 or CHIN 105 or CHIN 107; or by consent of instructor.

General Education Code

TA

CHIN 194 Group Tutorial

Provides a means for a small group of students to study a particular topic in consultation with a faculty sponsor. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHIN 199 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHIN 199F Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CLNI 1 Academic Literacy and Ethos: International and Global Perspectives

Teaches foundational concepts for intellectual exploration and personal development within an academic community: analysis, critical thinking, metacognition, engagement with others across difference, and self-efficacy. Addresses large-scale political, cultural, and economic issues to inform global citizenship.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to first-year college members.

Quarter offered

Fall

CLNI 60 Water Justice: Global Insights for a Critical Resource

Groundwater is a challenging resource to manage and conserve, one critically depleted across our state, country and world. Course explores the many manifestations of groundwater access, use and justice on multiple interlocking scales (i.e. local, national, transnational) while illustrating analytical ideas connecting to a range of socio-environmental processes including urbanization and infrastructure development, deprivation and exclusion, privatization of land and water, and claims for human rights. We will draw from cases based on our multi-country research project that brings together scholars and practitioners from Latin America, Europe, Africa and South Asia. Students will have the opportunity to conduct qualitative and secondary research contributing to the California case study in the Central Coast, focused on groundwater governance and perspectives of Latinx farmworkers and residents. 

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to College Scholars students.

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Fall

CLNI 70 Colleges Nine and Ten Community Garden

Students in this course design and build a new community garden at Colleges Nine and Ten. Students engage in a collaborative design process with campus stakeholders; learn hands-on skills and community gardening best practices; and build regenerative social and ecological systems.

Credits

2

Instructor

Linnea Beckett

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to College Nine and College Ten students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

CLNI 85 Global Action

Workshop facilitated by peer instructors. Students learn about current international and global issues through interactive exercises, small-group discussions, and faculty presentations. Students develop an action plan to raise awareness about one or more of these concerns and take practical steps to create positive change in the world.

Credits

2

Instructor

Erin Ramsden

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to College Nine members during priority enrollment only.

Quarter offered

Winter

CLNI 86 College Leadership Development

Students newly appointed into leadership positions at College Nine explore the concept of leadership relating to the college's theme of International and Global Perspectives. Prerequisite(s): current College Nine student leader; permission of instructor.

Credits

2

Instructor

Mirabai Hutton

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Spring

CLNI 90 Intercultural Understanding

Provides an opportunity to enhance the intercultural experience, increase cultural competency, promote further understanding, and examine the various trends facing a uniquely diverse community. Geared toward U.S. and international students affiliated with the International Living Center. Enrollment by instructor permission.

Credits

2

Instructor

Mirabai Hutton

Quarter offered

Fall

CLNI 91 Global Issues Colloquium

Weekly colloquium on global issues with different topical focus each quarter. Presentations by UCSC faculty and invited speakers. Students must attend class, read an assigned article, and write a one-page synopsis.

Credits

1

Instructor

David Lau

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to College Nine members.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

CLNI 105 Researching Food Sovereignty

Students engage in individual and collective research projects on transformational food systems in the United States and abroad. Readings look at the current global food system and grassroots responses to food and environmental crises.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior College Nine and College Ten members during priority enrollment only.

CLNI 106 Israel and Palestine: Pathways to a Deeper Understanding

Explores, and seeks to provide a deeper understanding of, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict through materials and guest speakers that offer varying perspectives. Self-reflection and structured communication facilitate the positive exchange of ideas and views. Enrollment by permission of instructor.

Credits

2

CLNI 112A Model United Nations Part A: A Group Seminar

Introduces the Model United Nations. Students learn parliamentary procedure and U.N. protocols, as well as how to research and present position papers to the general assembly. Students learn resolution writing, alliance building, and persuasive speech. (Formerly course 112, Model United Nations: A Group Seminar)

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CLNI 112B Model United Nations Part B: International Crises

Students are assigned a country to represent in the U.N. Three international crises allow students to present position papers, make speeches, and debate the issues.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CLNI 112A.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CLNI 115 Community Investing for Social Good: A Micro-finance Lab

Service-learning laboratory course that centers around investing by and in students to seed new social, economic, and environmental projects, ultimately aiming to build a campus culture of community investing to address needs linked to poverty and inequality.

Credits

2

CLNI 120 Practical Activism Conference Planning and Development

Offers an applied experience of collaborative planning, production, and leadership. Students plan workshops and other event components; conduct outreach and publicity; and address all aspects of educational event planning. Enrollment restricted to members of the spring volunteer Practical Activism planning group. Enrollment by permission of the instructor.

Credits

2

Instructor

Wendy Baxter

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Fall

CLNI 191 Teaching Global Action

Undergraduates at upper-division level participate in teaching discussion groups for College Nine 85 (W). Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor: essay describing interest in becoming course assistant, copies of evaluations, and letter of recommendation from faculty member and/or college staff member. Enrollment is restricted to College Nine juniors and seniors.

Credits

5

Instructor

Erin Ramsden

Quarter offered

Winter

CLNI 199 Tutorial

Individual directed study for upper-division college members with college-affiliated faculty. Students must submit petition with one of the college academic advisers with accompanying letter from faculty adviser. Approval of provost required. Enrollment is restricted to upper-division College Nine members.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CLNI 199F Tutorial

Individual directed study for upper-division college members with college-affiliated faculty. Students must submit petition with one of the college academic advisers with accompanying letter from faculty adviser. Approval of provost required. Enrollment is restricted to upper-division College Nine members.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CLST 99 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CLST 197F Senior Comprehensive Examination Preparation

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CLST 199 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CLST 199F Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CLTE 1 Academic Literacy and Ethos: Social Justice and Community

Teaches foundational concepts for intellectual exploration and personal development within an academic community: analysis, critical thinking, metacognition, engagement with others across difference, and self-efficacy. Reflects our college theme of Social Justice and Community, addressing topics such as identity formation, inequality, and environmental injustice.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to first-year college members.

Quarter offered

Fall

CLTE 30 (H)ACER Undergraduate Community Internship

Student Internship through the Apprenticeship in Community Engaged Research (H)ACER Program at College Nine and College Ten. The (H)ACER Program joins community engagement with critical reflexive components of qualitative research to support transformative learning and strengthen community-university partnerships. Students will be placed at a variety of internships and work with our community partners such as Calabasas Elementary School classroom teachers, Calabasas Elementary School After School Program, Calabasas Community Garden, and Watsonville High School classroom teachers. Students also may propose internships if they already have strong ties with a community partner and receive approval from the (H)ACER Director. Requires students to read selected readings on critical service learning, community learning, qualitative research methods and a variety of texts relevant to the history, context and activities at the sites where they will intern. Internships will take place primarily in Watsonville. Enrollment by permission of the instructor.

Credits

2

Cross Listed Courses

CLNI 30

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CLTE 60 Understanding Sustainability: Researching Environmental Justice at UCSC

Through readings, discussions, and primary research on campus, course explores the following questions: What is sustainability at UCSC and what assumptions about the relationships between humans and nature are privileged in these definitions? (Formerly, I Couldn't Imagine Myself Anywhere Else: Understanding UCSC Undergraduate Narratives.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Majzler

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to College Scholars students.

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Fall

CLTE 85 Social Justice Issues Workshop

Series of presentations, films, and workshops that address personal and cultural identity and examine social, cultural, political, environmental, and other justice concerns.

Credits

2

Instructor

Wendy Baxter

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to College Ten members during priority enrollment only.

Quarter offered

Winter

CLTE 86 College Leadership Development

Students newly appointed into leadership positions at College Ten explore the concept of leadership relating to the college's theme of Social Justice and Community. Prerequisite(s): current College Ten student leader; permission of instructor.

Credits

2

Instructor

Mirabai Hutton

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Spring

CLTE 92 Social Justice Issues Colloquium

Weekly colloquium on social justice issues with a different topical focus each quarter. Presentations by UCSC faculty and invited speakers. Students must attend class, read an assigned article or book chapter(s) on the week's topic, and write a one-page synopsis.

Credits

1

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CLTE 95 Social Justice and Nonviolent Communication (Rumi's Field Living-Learning Community)

Rumi's Field Nonviolent Communication Living-Learning Community operates in a spirit of cooperation, compassion, and goodwill. Students living on Rumi's Field enroll in this course in fall to explore the relevance of nonviolence to the pursuit of social justice. Restricted to residents of the Rumi's Field. (Formerly Nonviolent Communication [Living-Learning Community])

Credits

1

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

CLTE 98 Alternative Spring Break

Provides students with the opportunity to conduct service-learning work in a local Santa Cruz community over spring break. There are four preliminary class meetings in the winter quarter. Winter meeting attendance is required. Enrollment is by interview only. Enrollment is restricted to College Nine and College Ten members.

Credits

2

Instructor

Linnea Beckett

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Spring

CLTE 105 The Making and Influencing of Environmental Policy

Explores how environmental policy is made and influenced. Students learn about key contemporary environmental issues and the forces at play in determining environmental policy outcomes. Focuses on skills that enable citizens to impact environmental policy. (Formerly The Making and Influencing of Nuclear Policy.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to sophomore, junior, and seniors.

General Education Code

PE-E

CLTE 106 Expressive Arts for Social Justice

Students explore their own creative output in order to inspire community dialogue around social justice issues. Open to those who identify as artists as well as those who do not. Interested students must attend an information session and commit to expectations. Preference is given to College Nine and College Ten members.

Credits

2

Instructor

The Staff, Wendy Baxter

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Spring

CLTE 115 Research Methods for Social Justice

Fosters a deeper intellectual engagement with the theme of College Ten through the design and implementation of community-based research projects developed in close consultation with community partners. Students gain methodological, teamwork, and critical-thinking skills while furthering social justice. Prerequisite(s): College Nine 85, or College Ten 85, or equivalent. Enrollment is restricted to College Nine and College Ten members and by permission of instructor.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Spring

CLTE 120 Practical Activism Conference Planning and Development

Offers an applied experience of collaborative planning, production, and leadership. Students plan workshops and other event components; conduct outreach and publicity; and address all aspects of educational event planning. Enrollment is restricted to members of the spring volunteer Practical Activism planning group. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.

Credits

2

Instructor

Wendy Baxter

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Fall

CLTE 125A Transcommunal Peace Making

Explores the theoretical tenets and applications of Transcommunality, an outgrowth of the principles of Kingian non-violence, which works toward peace, tolerance, and mutual respect across difference and diversity. UCSC students connect with the Cemanahuac Cultural group, a multi-ethnic and multi-racial gathering of incarcerated men who are warriors for peace within and outside the prison community. Three meetings will be held at the Correctional Training Facility (CTF) in Soledad, California. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior College Ten members and by interview.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

CLTE 125B Transcommunal Peace Making

Explores the principles of community, guided by established texts, for inmates at the Correctional Training Facility (CTF) in Soledad, California. Covers the theoretical tenets and applications of Transcommunality, an outgrowth of the principles of Kingian non-violence. Three joint meetings will be held with UCSC students enrolled in the parallel course 125A. Enrollment by permission of instructor.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

CLTE 135 Apprenticeship in Community Engaged Research

Course takes a holistic approach in familiarizing students about how to effectively and ethically conduct community engaged research, from contextualized understandings of power and knowledge to hands-on training in various methodologies through a class project. The topical focus of the course varies (e.g., sustainability, water justice, educational equity etc.). (Formerly Social Justice, Institutions, and Power.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Linnea Beckett

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CLTE 85, or CLNI 85, or equivalent. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior College Ten and College Nine members.

American History and Institutions

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

CLTE 136 Methodologies of Critical Praxis

Considers an ethic of engaging with communities that honors existing knowledges and integrates them into community-engaged action plans and research strategies. Explores a list of questions critical scholars must consider when building socially just community partnerships. Interrogates notions of help and volunteerism and explores theories and practices of popular education as a praxis engagement. Includes practice interviews, oral histories, field notes, and other research methods. Interacts with community partners through forums, blogs, and other multimedia.

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Majzler

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CLTE 135 or an equivalent course.

Quarter offered

Spring

CLTE 191 Teaching Social Justice

Undergraduates at upper-division level participate in teaching discussion groups for College Ten 85 (W). Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor: essay describing interest in becoming course assistant, copies of evaluations, and letter of recommendation from faculty member and/or college staff member. Enrollment is restricted to College Ten juniors and seniors.

Credits

5

Instructor

Wendy Baxter

Quarter offered

Winter

CLTE 194 Group Tutorial

Independent study through which a group of students explores a particular topic in consultation with an instructor. Prerequisite(s): Course 91 or 105 recommended. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CLTE 194F Group Tutorial

Independent study through which a group of students explores a particular topic in consultation with an instructor. Prerequisite(s): Course 91 or 105 recommended. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Instructor

The Staff

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CLTE 199 Tutorial

Individual directed study for upper-division college members with college-affiliated faculty. Students must submit petition with one of the college academic advisers with accompanying letter from faculty adviser. Approval of provost required. Enrollment is restricted to upper-division College Ten members.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CLTE 199F Tutorial

Individual directed study for upper-division college members with college-affiliated faculty. Students must submit petition with one of the college academic advisers with accompanying letter from faculty adviser. Approval of provost required. Enrollment is restricted to upper-division College Ten members.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 10 Introduction to Community Activism

Surveys different strategies of community activism including charity, volunteering, labor and community organizing, and recently emerging global activism with goal of demonstrating how certain strategies challenge existing social relations and arrangements while others typically (and often by design) reproduce them.

Credits

5

Instructor

Leslie Lopez

Quarter offered

Fall

CMMU 30 Numbers and Social Justice

Relates simple lessons of quantitative thinking to topical materials that are accessible and relevant to working for justice and social change. Students learn practical techniques to distinguish credible statistical evidence from misleading statistical claims. (Formerly Numbers for Social Justice.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Andrea Steiner

General Education Code

SR

Quarter offered

Summer

CMMU 93 Field Study

Supervised work in a community-based setting conducted under the guidance of a faculty member. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 93F Field Study

Supervised work in a community-based setting conducted under the guidance of a faculty member. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 93G Field Study

Supervised work in a community-based setting conducted under the guidance of a faculty member. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

3

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 99 Tutorial

Individual directed study for lower-division undergraduates.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 99F Tutorial

Individual directed study for lower-division undergraduates.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 101 Communities, Social Movements, and the Third Sector

Engages with crosscutting ideas and concepts central to the major including constructions of community in social-change efforts and the institutionalization of social movements in third-sector organizations. Deepens students' understanding of the opportunities and obstacles embedded in various avenues of social action.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mary Pudup

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to sophomore, junior, and senior community studies majors and proposed majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

CMMU 102 Preparation for Field Studies

A practicum to prepare students for field study. Course must be successfully completed prior to the six-month field study. Prerequisite(s): course 10; course 101; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; submission of the signed Goals and Objectives form; and completion of the declaration of major process. Enrollment restricted to community studies majors.

Credits

5

Instructor

Andrea Steiner

Quarter offered

Spring

CMMU 103 Field Study Practicum

A practicum in social change work in which the students works for a social change organization on a part-time basis. Concurrent enrollment in course 102 is required.

Credits

2

Instructor

Andrea Steiner

Quarter offered

Spring

CMMU 105A Field Study

Full-time independent field study in an approved off-campus setting with onsite supervision by the sponsoring organization and regular distanced supervision by campus faculty. Enrollment is restricted to community studies majors upon completion of the required preparatory coursework. Prerequisite(s): course 102. (Formerly course 198, Independent Field Study.)

Credits

5

Instructor

M. Pudup

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

CMMU 105B Field Study

Full-time independent field study in an approved off-campus setting with onsite supervision by the sponsoring organization and regular distanced supervision by campus faculty. Enrollment is restricted to community studies majors upon completion of the required preparatory coursework. Prerequisite(s): course 102. (Formerly course 198, Independent Field Study.)

Credits

5

Instructor

M. Pudup

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

CMMU 105C Field Study

Full-time independent field study in an approved off-campus setting with onsite supervision by the sponsoring organization and regular distanced supervision by campus faculty. Enrollment is restricted to community studies majors upon completion of the required preparatory coursework. Prerequisite(s): course 102. (Formerly course 198, Independent Field Study.)

Credits

5

Instructor

M. Pudup

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

CMMU 107 Analysis of Field Materials

A seminar for students who have completed a full-time field study. Devoted to the systematic analysis of field materials, integrating appropriate concepts and relevant literature, as well as utilizing the experience of other students. (Formerly course 194.)

Credits

5

Instructor

A. Steiner

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements, course 198. Enrollment is restricted to community studies majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

CMMU 132 American Cities and Social Change

Examines the historical development of and contemporary conditions within U.S. cities by focusing on social and economic restructurings of cities, cultural and political transformations, and spatial reorganizations of the urban landscape. Goal is understanding the changing nature of urban experience.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mary Pudup

Quarter offered

Fall

CMMU 133 Making California: Landscapes, People, Politics, Economy

Examines key moments in the development of California to provide understanding of the challenges and opportunities facing California today. Particular focus is given to abiding tensions around wealth and poverty, opportunity and exclusion, and progressive and conservative politics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Julie Guthman

CMMU 134 No Place Like Home

Examines the class and race dynamics of the housing market and public policy, asking what kinds of housing get built, where it gets built, and for whom it is (or is not) built--and, crucially, why. Questions how homelessness became normalized in contemporary society.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mary Pudup

CMMU 141 Political Justice in Theory and Practice

Examines how markets operate within the political economy of contemporary capitalism to generate myriad and often chronic forms of economic and social inequality in the United States. Explores different approaches to addressing inequality within the multi-faceted economic justice movement. (Formerly Political Economy of Inequality.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Mary Pudup

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to community studies majors and proposed majors during First Pass enrollment.

CMMU 143 Wal-Mart Nation

Examines origins and growth of Wal-Mart stores as powerful guides to understanding dynamics of contemporary global political economy and, relatedly, the changing fortunes of global social classes.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mary Pudup

CMMU 145 Global Capitalism: a History of the Present

Provides an overview of the history of capitalism in order to understand current crises within the global political economy. Gives particular attention to the origin, character, and consequences of neoliberalism. (Formerly Globalization and Its Discontents.)

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

CMMU 149 Political Economy of Food and Agriculture

Examines key concepts in agrarian political economy; the historical development of the world food system; and a selection of contemporary issues related to food production, consumption, distribution, and regulation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Julie Guthman

General Education Code

PE-E

CMMU 151 Sex, Race, and Globalization

Examines globalization by attending to shaping forces of sexuality, gender, and race. Foregrounds Third World feminist theories, social movements. Topics include sexual and racial dynamics of free trade and labor fragmentation; global sex trades; HIV/AIDS politics in the South and North; transnational LGBT/queer politics.

Credits

5

CMMU 156 Politics of Food and Health

Critically examines contemporary debates about market and policy approaches to improve nutrition and dietary health and to address issues, such as food insecurity, obesity, and malnutrition. (Formerly Politics of Obesity.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Julie Guthman

General Education Code

PE-H

Quarter offered

Spring

CMMU 157 Ageism and Activism

Introduces students to gerontology, the study of aging. Taking a multidisciplinary approach, critically examines the theories, stereotypes, and realities of worldwide demographic transition and considers the many interesting implications for organizing social and personal life.

Credits

5

Instructor

Andrea Steiner

CMMU 160 Public Health

Examination of community activism to address health issues: examples are drawn from a range of concerns, e.g., environmental racism, prison conditions, feminist health matters, the AIDS epidemic, violence, and alcoholism. Special attention is given to the social frameworks of health and to the utilization of social and political strategies for improving community well-being.

Credits

5

Instructor

A. Steiner

Quarter offered

Fall

CMMU 161 Gender Health and Justice

Critically examines concrete aspects of health in U.S. social and political contexts, emphasizing how gendered interpretations and practices construct and affect health equity and the practices of health care. (Formerly Women's Health Activism.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Andrea Steiner

CMMU 162 Community Gardens and Social Change

Examines history, theory, and practice of community gardening, emphasizing contemporary garden projects using the transformative power of direct contact with nature to effect social change. Aims include understanding the nonprofit sector's response to social problems with novel programs and practices.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mary Pudup

CMMU 163 Health Care Inequalities

Examines system and non-system that is American health care with special attention to inequalities in access, financing, and quality of care. Covers concepts such as equality, fairness, and need as well as community organizing and community building for health.

Credits

5

Instructor

Andrea Steiner

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to community studies majors and proposed majors during First Pass enrollment.

CMMU 164 Health Justice in Conflict

Explores three case studies to address critical themes of healthcare inequalities in the context of conflict: the legal battle of Ecuadorians against Texaco/Chevron; the struggle of comfort women during World War II; and chemical saturation in Iraq.

Credits

5

CMMU 186 Food and Agriculture Social Movements

Examines the primary ways in which activists are attempting to resist, provide alternatives to, and/or transform aspects of the food system using social and environmental justice frameworks to evaluate such activism. Topics explored include organic farming, food charity, fair trade, relocalization, and farmworker organizing. Enrollment is by permission of instructor. (Formerly Agriculture, Food, and Social Justice.)

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

CMMU 189 Methods of Teaching Community Studies

Each student serves as a facilitator for small discussion groups in connection with core community studies courses. Facilitators complete course readings and meet with instructor as a group to discuss the teaching process. May not be counted toward upper-division major requirements. Prerequisite(s): prior course work in the major.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 191 Student Volunteer Internship

Course bridges Santa Cruz and university communities through students organizing volunteer opportunities and charitable events. Students contribute 10 hours per week on and off campus, including outreach, event-planning, and database maintenance; supplemented by reading and biweekly discussions. Enrollment is by permission of instructor after application and interview.

Credits

3

Instructor

Andrea Steiner

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 192 Directed Student Teaching

Teaching of a lower-division seminar, course 42, under faculty supervision. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Approval by the Committee on Educational Policy the prior quarter.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 193 Field Study

Supervised work in a community-based setting conducted under the guidance of a faculty member. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 193F Field Study

Supervised work in a community-based setting conducted under the guidance of a faculty member. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 193G Field Study

Supervised work in a community-based setting conducted under the guidance of a faculty member. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

3

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 195A Senior Thesis

Individual study with a faculty member to complete the senior thesis.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 195B Senior Thesis

Individual study with a faculty member to complete the senior thesis.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 195C Senior Thesis

Individual study with a faculty member to complete the senior thesis.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 199 Tutorial

Advanced directed reading and research for the serious student.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 199F Tutorial

Advanced directed reading and research for the serious student.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 297 Independent Study

Either study related to a course being taken or a totally independent study. Designed for graduate students. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMPM 25 Introduction to 3D Modeling

Introduces theory and techniques of 3D computer graphics. Topics include: capabilities of modern graphic