Graduate

ENVS 201A Research Approaches in Environmental Studies

The first course of a two-quarter sequence that explores the range of scholarly traditions that inform the kinds of research common to the Environmental Studies Department at UCSC.

Credits

5

Instructor

Karen Holl

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

ENVS 201B Environmental Studies In Practice

The second course in a two-quarter sequence that is designed for beginning graduate students in environmental studies and in any other related field. Introduces interdisciplinary approaches of environmental studies and is an experiential, hands-on class focused on a specific environmental problem.

Credits

5

Instructor

Elliott Campbell, Maywa Montenegro

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

ENVS 210 Political Ecological Thought and Environment

Provides an introduction to social scientific analyses of the relationships between capitalistic development and the environment in the late 20th century. It has a dual purpose: First, to develop a contemporary historical understanding and sensibility of how economic change, new institutional configurations, and world scale processes are shaping interactions with the environment. Second, to examine some recent political social theoretical perspectives on nature-society relations and radical environmental and social movements.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students in environmental studies.

ENVS 215A Geographic Information Systems and Environmental Applications

Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) as the technology of processing spatial data, including input, storage and retrieval; manipulation and analysis; reporting and interpretation. Emphasizes GIS as a decision support system for environmental and social problem solving, using basic model building, experimental design, and database management. Students cannot receive credit for this course and ENVS 115A.

Credits

5

Instructor

Barry Nickel

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in ENVS 215L is required. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

ENVS 215B Intermediate Geographic Information Systems

Evaluates advanced technologies of processing spatial data, spatial theory, and application to unique geographic problems, data manipulation and analysis, and reporting and interpretation. Emphasizes GIS as a decision-support system for environmental and social problem solving, using basic model building, experimental design, and database management. Taught in conjunction with ENVS 115B. Students cannot receive credit for this course and ENVS 115B.

Credits

5

Instructor

Barry Nickel

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ENVS 215A. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ENVS 215L Exercises in Geographic Information Systems

Exercises in Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing that demonstrate the development of digital geographic data. Students gain hands-on experience with developing datasets, using imagery to create GIS layers, performing spatial analysis, and utilizing GPS technology. Emphasis placed on environmental applications. Students cannot receive credit for this course and ENVS 115L.

Credits

2

Instructor

Barry Nickel

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in ENVS 215A is required. Enrollment is restricted to environmental studies graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

ENVS 220 Conservation Biology

The principles of conservation biology, including a review of the core disciplines of demography, population genetics, island biogeography, and community ecology and discussion of area and edge effects, population viability, and ecosystem issues related to the maintenance of biological diversity, especially in fragmented landscapes.

Credits

5

Instructor

Christopher Wilmers

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to environmental studies graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ENVS 230 Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture

The application of ecological concepts and principles to the design and management of agricultural systems. The long-term goal of sustainable agroecosystems is examined in economic, social, and ecological contexts.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to environmental studies graduate students.

ENVS 235 Social Theories of Nature

Intensive reading and discussion seminar on the treatment of nature in social theory. Focuses on major recent works which examine nature in social theory, in themselves, and in the context of the intellectual history of development of disciplinary discourses about nature. Students write critical reviews of assigned books and a research paper situating a particular book within its intellectual tradition. Prerequisite(s): interview with instructor to determine preparedness.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ENVS 240 Public Policy and Conservation

Introduction to political and economic approaches to policy analysis, with particular reference to natural resource scarcity, property rights, and environmental conservation. Case studies apply economic and policy process concepts to the management of public lands, biodiversity, and renewable resources.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

CSP 242

Instructor

Mijin Cha

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to environmental studies graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ENVS 247 Regional Approaches to Environmental Policy

A research seminar combining theoretical issues in democratic theory, political economy, and planning with emerging concepts of bioregionalism. The focus is on institutional, scientific, and political innovations in managing the environment. Students evaluate current and historical proposals to regionalize environmental policy in the U.S.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to environmental studies graduate students.

ENVS 250 Coastal Governance

Introduction to major theories of ocean and coastal governance, with emphasis on those that underlie current policy and management approaches. Students analyze local, state, national, and international laws and policies, considering interactions across scales, levels of social organization, and institutions.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

CSP 243

Instructor

Katherine Seto

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to environmental studies graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ENVS 263 Plant Disease Ecology

Introduction to ecological roles of plant diseases, including their importance in regulating plant populations dynamics, community diversity and system function in natural ecosystems, considerations of plant diseases in conservation ecology, and ecological approaches to managing diseases in agroecosystems. Students cannot receive credit for this course and ENVS 163.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): one ecology course. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ENVS 265 Data Science for the Environment

Data science is growing exponentially in size and quality, changing environmental scholarship and creating challenges of sifting, processing, and synthesizing large and diverse sources of information. In this course, students learn the fundamental practices of environmental informatics mainly using the R programming language. The workshop-style course is designed without requirement on prior experience in R. Includes environmental-related modules such as climate change, plant growth, animal predator-prey dynamics, overfishing and marine protected areas. Throughout the quarter, students use new hands-on skills to find an environmental-related topic, write a proposal, search for data, perform analyses, summarize results, and complete a final paper.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ENVS 268 Biogeochemistry and the Global Environment

Studies biogeochemical cycles and related environmental issues such as global environmental change, eutrophication, ecosystem degradation, and agricultural sustainabilty. Discusses transformation and movement of major nutrient elements in context of watershed ecology and societal implications. Students cannot receive credit for this course and ENVS 168.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to environmental studies graduate students.

ENVS 271 Valuing the Environment

Intensive seminar examining the normative underpinnings of environmental values. Draws on tools from analytical, ethical, and political philosophy to develop normative arguments concerning environmental inequality and justice, environmental preservation, and risk evaluation. Involves team projects in which students develop cases on controversial contemporary issues such as biotechnology. Prerequisite(s): interview only. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ENVS 272 Qualitative Field Methods

Introduces qualitative research approaches in environmental studies. Focuses on philosophies of science, epistemological debates, and specific approaches to qualitative methods. Course components include: field safety, research ethics, human subjects, training, research design and sampling, field observation and ethnographies, key informants, field notes, focus groups, oral histories, narrative research, archival research, questionnaires, discourse analysis, participatory research, and qualitative data analysis techniques.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jeff Bury

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ENVS 280 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies

Intensive research seminar, including reading and critique of primary research literature and research in progress. Topics vary and are announced in advance; students should consult with faculty prior to enrolling. Enrollment by permission of instructor. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ENVS 283 Environmental Studies Internship

Graduate level internship focuses on integrating interdisciplinary academic theory with practical, specialized experience in a professional setting. Course intended for environmental studies graduate students; students must complete paperwork and meet with coordinator prior to first day of instruction.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 290 Interdisciplinary Research Seminar

Research seminars presented weekly throughout the year by environmental studies and affiliated faculty, by visiting scholars, and by graduate students. Students discuss the content and methodology of research presented following each seminar.

Credits

2

Instructor

Elliott Campbell

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 290L Graduate Research Seminar

Graduate student presentations of doctoral research proposals, dissertation work-in-progress, grant applications, and conference papers. This weekly laboratory meeting seeks to develop professional skills, teach constructive criticism, and foster effective discussion among peers.

Credits

2

Instructor

Jeff Bury, Karen Holl

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall, Spring

ENVS 291 Advanced Readings in Environmental Studies

Focusing on a recently published volume or on a topic of current interest, this seminar requires a rigorous analysis of the principles and methods employed in the four core areas of the program: sustainable agriculture and agro-ecology; conservation biology; environmental policy analysis; and political economy.

Credits

3

Instructor

Barry Nickel, Jeffrey Bury

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 291C Advanced Readings in Risk and Public Policy

Advanced readings and research on environmental risk and public policy. Explores environmental decision making given the question of the burden of proof and scientific uncertainty and grapples, in an advanced manner, with emergent policy alternatives, such as the precautionary principle. Also offered as ENVS 281C for 5 credits.

Credits

3

Instructor

S Rajan

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ENVS 172 or equivalent work demonstrated by an interview. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ENVS 291D Advanced Readings in Tropical Ecology, Agriculture, and Development

Analyzes recent publications in ecology, conservation, agroecology, and development in tropical and subtropical regions, particularly Latin America. Discussions place special emphasis on integration across natural and social science disciplines to address issues of sustainability in tropical regions.

Credits

3

Instructor

Karen Holl

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ENVS 291M Advanced Readings in Biogeochemistry

Course consists of three parts: fundamental biogeochemistry of the Earth, global cycles of nutrient elements, and societal and scientific issues of global change. Class activities include (1) presentation of summary statements based on reading assignments; (2) discussion of theories, concepts, methodologies, and applications; (3) computer simulation and modeling of elemental cycles using STELLA; and (4) integration of scientific information on global change with social issues by writing.

Credits

3

Instructor

Weixin Cheng

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ENVS 291P Advanced Readings in Environmental History and Anthropology

Course of readings systematically surveying the theoretical contributions of the disciplines of environmental history, historical ecology, environmental anthropology, and geography. After an overview of the evolution of 20th-century thought on the relationship between environment and culture as seen through the lenses of these disciplines, explores emerging research hybrids and new research frontiers.

Credits

3

Instructor

S Rajan

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ENVS 292 Topics in Research in Environmental Studies

Seminar in which students give critically evaluated presentations regarding current research in environmental studies and issues in research design. Students should consult with faculty prior to enrolling.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 297A Independent Study

Independent study and research under faculty supervision. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

ENVS 297B Independent Study

Independent study and research under faculty supervision. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

ENVS 297C Independent Study

Independent study and research under faculty supervision. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

ENVS 297F Independent Study

Independent study and research under faculty supervision. Intended to be taken in conjunction with a 5-credit course. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 299A Thesis Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 299B Thesis Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

10

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ENVS 299C Thesis Research

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

15

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Cross-listed courses that are managed by another department are listed at the bottom.

Cross-listed Courses

BIOE 125 Ecosystems of California

A survey of the diversity, structure, and functioning of California's ecosystems through time and the ways they have influenced and responded to human activities and stewardship. Topics include: ecosystem drivers such as climate, soils, and land-use history; human and ecological prehistory; comparative marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystem dynamics; and managed ecosystems such as range, fisheries, and agriculture.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 125

Instructor

The Staff, Erika Zavaleta

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOE 20C. Enrollment is restricted to ecology and evolution, marine biology, plant sciences, and biology B.A. majors.

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

BIOE 151A Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Ecological Field Methods

An intensive, on-site learning experience in terrestrial field ecology and conservation, using the University of California Natural Reserves and other natural areas. Students study advance concepts in ecology, conservation, and field methods for four weeks, then experience total immersion in field research at the UC Natural Reserves and other natural areas. Lectures, field experiments, writing assignments, and computer exercises familiarize students with research methods, study design, statistical approaches, and analytical tools for ecological research. Students complete and communicate the results of short field projects in ecology, learn the natural history of the flora and fauna of California, and plan and execute a significant, independent field-research study at the end of the quarter. Enrollment is by application. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, ENVS 24, ENVS 100; and STAT 7 & STAT 7L (formerly AMS 7 & AMS 7L). Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151B-BIOE 151C-BIOE 151D or ENVS 109B-ENVS 109C-ENVS 109D is required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, BIOE 150L, ENVS 104A or ENVS 196A.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 109A

Instructor

Donald Croll, Gage Dayton

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 151C Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Functions and Processes of Terrestrial Ecosystems

From lectures and discussion of terrestrial community and ecosystem ecology, students work individually or in small groups to present an idea for a project, review relevant literature, develop a research question/hypothesis, design and perform an experiment, collect and analyze data, and write a report. The instructor evaluates the feasibility of each student's project before it begins. Enrollment is by application. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, ENVS 24, ENVS 100; and STAT 7 & STAT 7L (formerly AMS 7 & AMS 7L). Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151A-BIOE 151B-BIOE 151D or ENVS 109A-ENVS 109B-ENVS 109D is required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, BIOE 150L, ENVS 104A or ENVS 196A.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 109C

Instructor

Donald Croll, Gage Dayton

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 151D Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Conservation in Practice

Focuses on current issues in environmental and conservation biology and the emerging field methods used to address them. From field-oriented lectures about current issues in environmental and conservation biology, students pursue research project as individuals and small groups to develop hands-on experience with field skills in conservation research and resource management. Enrollment is by application. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, ENVS 24, ENVS 100; and STAT 7 & STAT 7L (formerly AMS 7 & AMS 7L). Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151A-B-C or ENVS 109A-B-C required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, BIOE 150L, ENVS 104A or ENVS 196A.

Credits

4

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 109D

Instructor

Donald Croll, Gage Dayton

Quarter offered

Spring

FMST 136 Organizing for Water Justice in California

Investigates, imagines, and practices movement toward water justice in California using feminist, Indigenous, and critical race theory. The course includes collaborative projects with environmental justice organizers in the Central Valley, and offers new ways of thinking about water inequity and access through racial capitalism, settler colonialism, and critical theories of place.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

CRES 136, ENVS 136

Instructor

Vivian Underhill

General Education Code

PR-E

LGST 148 Cites, Urban Planning, and the Law

Explores how local land use and planning objectives are defined and determined by federal, state, and (most importantly) local law. Focuses on California, and on California municipal law issues. Housing, transportation, water supply, regional government, environmental protection, natural resource protection, urban sprawl, and growth management issues are addressed as students learn how federal, state, and local laws relate to city urban planning problems.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 148

Instructor

Gary Patton

Quarter offered

Fall