Lower-Division

ENVS 15 Natural History of the UCSC Campus

Introduces students to the range of natural species and communities occurring on the UCSC campus. All class time is spent outside, and each week a different area of campus is visited. Course 24 is recommended.

Credits

2

Instructor

Christopher Lay

Quarter offered

Winter

ENVS 17 Curation of Natural History Collections

Introduction and training in the skills needed to create, manage, and exhibit natural history collections, including plants, insects, fungi, birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians.

Credits

2

Instructor

The Staff

Quarter offered

Winter

ENVS 18 Natural History Illustration

Students gain proficiency in illustration media, and acquire training in the essential skills needed to create natural-history inspired illustrations. Students create illustrations and paintings by studying organisms in the Norris Center for Natural History collections, as well as those living on and around campus. Some experience in basic drawing and/or natural-history sketching is recommended.

Credits

5

Instructor

Emily Underwood

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Winter

ENVS 19 Topics in Natural History

Students learn the fundamentals of organismal biology and ecology through observations in the field, museum specimens, and field journaling. Class focuses on a particular taxonomic group or natural community, such as reptiles, fungi, insects, coastal prairie, or chaparral. Enrollment by application. Please email envsadvi@ucsc.edu for applications.

Credits

3

Instructor

Sean Reilly, Christian Schwarz

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 23 The Physical and Chemical Environment

Provides an overview of the physical and chemical environment of planet Earth. Fundamental chemistry and physics is introduced in the process of learning about Earth in a holistic way. The influence of human societies on the global environment is one focus of discussion. Earth's many spheres are explored first: the lithosphere; the atmosphere; the hydrosphere, and the ecosphere. Then global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, and several other elements are studied in the context of basic sciences and societal issues.

Credits

5

Instructor

Michael Loik

Quarter offered

Spring

ENVS 24 General Ecology

Covers principles of ecology including limits to species abundances, evolutionary ecology, population dynamics, community interactions and patterns, and ecosystem patterns and dynamics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kai Zhu

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): AM 3 or AM 6, or MATH 3 or higher; or mathematics placement examination (MPE) score of 300 or higher; or AP Calculus AB exam score of 3 or higher; ENVS 23 recommended as prerequisite to this course.

General Education Code

SI

Quarter offered

Fall

ENVS 25 Environmental Policy and Economics

Introduces the policy and economic dimensions of some pressing environmental challenges. Case studies may include, biodiversity conservation, waste, water, climate change, and other topics to examine the drivers and policy responses to environmental problems and the trade-offs in different policy solutions.

Credits

5

Instructor

Sikinq Jinnah

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

ENVS 65 Introduction to Fresh Water: Processes and Policy

Introduction to freshwater resources from multiple scientific and policy perspectives. After a review of basic concepts, water issues affecting cities, farms, open space, and multiple-use landscapes are studied. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have previously received credit for ENVS 165.

Credits

5

General Education Code

PE-E

ENVS 80B The Ecological Forecast for Global Warming

A broad overview of the impacts of human activities on the global climate system. Topics include how climate affects the distribution of ecosystems, the influence of global climate change on biodiversity, ecosystem function, and consequences for the human enterprise.

Credits

5

Instructor

Elliott Campbell

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Fall

ENVS 80C Climate Change Science and Policy

An interdisciplinary overview of the science and policy of global climate change. Topics include Earth system science, climate change impacts on the environment, climate change policy, and the future of climate change politics from the local to the global.

Credits

5

General Education Code

PE-E

ENVS 80F Introduction to Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems

Our current food system is unsustainable for the environment and unjust for the farmers, farmworkers, and consumers who depend on it. Course provides an interdisciplinary, experiential, and systems-focused introduction to agroecology and other approaches to advancing a more just and ecologically sustainable food system. Students will come to understand agroecology as a science for understanding agricultural ecosystems, as a farming practice, and as a social movement to change the way we produce and distribute/access food. Course examines many topics—including biological fertility and pest management, seeds, livestock raising, and aquaculture—from the perspective of both the natural and social sciences, leaving students with a perspective that transcends any particular academic discipline. Students gain hands-on experience with farming research, production, and food distribution happening across the UCSC campus farm and food system.

Credits

5

Instructor

Damian Parr

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Fall

ENVS 83 Environmental Studies Internship

A supervised off-campus learning experience related to environmental problem solving. Focuses on initial experiences in applied work and specific skill development. Students may be placed individually or with a team in government agencies, private organizations, citizen action groups.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 99 Tutorial

Directed reading, supervised research, and organized projects relating to environmental problems. May be repeated for credit with consent of the chairperson of Environmental Studies Department. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 99F Tutorial

Provides for department-sponsored directed reading, supervised research, or organized project for lower-division students under the direct supervision of a faculty sponsor. May not be counted toward major requirements. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

Cross-listed courses that are managed by another department are listed at the bottom.

Cross-listed Courses

BIOE 125 Ecosystems of California

A survey of the diversity, structure, and functioning of California's ecosystems through time and the ways they have influenced and responded to human activities and stewardship. Topics include: ecosystem drivers such as climate, soils, and land-use history; human and ecological prehistory; comparative marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystem dynamics; and managed ecosystems such as range, fisheries, and agriculture.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 125

Instructor

The Staff, Erika Zavaleta

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOE 20C. Enrollment is restricted to ecology and evolution, marine biology, plant sciences, and biology B.A. majors.

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

BIOE 151A Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Ecological Field Methods

An intensive, on-site learning experience in terrestrial field ecology and conservation, using the University of California Natural Reserves and other natural areas. Students study advance concepts in ecology, conservation, and field methods for four weeks, then experience total immersion in field research at the UC Natural Reserves and other natural areas. Lectures, field experiments, writing assignments, and computer exercises familiarize students with research methods, study design, statistical approaches, and analytical tools for ecological research. Students complete and communicate the results of short field projects in ecology, learn the natural history of the flora and fauna of California, and plan and execute a significant, independent field-research study at the end of the quarter. Enrollment is by application. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, ENVS 24, ENVS 100; and STAT 7 & STAT 7L (formerly AMS 7 & AMS 7L). Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151B-BIOE 151C-BIOE 151D or ENVS 109B-ENVS 109C-ENVS 109D is required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, BIOE 150L, ENVS 104A or ENVS 196A.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 109A

Instructor

Donald Croll, Gage Dayton

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 151B Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Ecological Field Methods Laboratory

Field-oriented course in ecological research. Combines overview of methodologies and approaches to field research with practical field studies. Students complete field projects in ecology and also learn the natural history of the flora and fauna of California. Students are billed a materials fee. Enrollment is by application. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, ENVS 24, ENVS 100; and STAT 7 & STAT 7L (formerly AMS 7 & AMS 7L); satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151A-BIOE 151C-BIOE 151D or ENVS 109A-ENVS 109C-ENVS 109D is required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, BIOE 150L, ENVS 104A or ENVS 196A.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 109B

Instructor

Donald Croll, Gage Dayton

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 151C Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Functions and Processes of Terrestrial Ecosystems

From lectures and discussion of terrestrial community and ecosystem ecology, students work individually or in small groups to present an idea for a project, review relevant literature, develop a research question/hypothesis, design and perform an experiment, collect and analyze data, and write a report. The instructor evaluates the feasibility of each student's project before it begins. Enrollment is by application. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, ENVS 24, ENVS 100; and STAT 7 & STAT 7L (formerly AMS 7 & AMS 7L). Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151A-BIOE 151B-BIOE 151D or ENVS 109A-ENVS 109B-ENVS 109D is required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, BIOE 150L, ENVS 104A or ENVS 196A.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 109C

Instructor

Donald Croll, Gage Dayton

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 151D Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Conservation in Practice

Focuses on current issues in environmental and conservation biology and the emerging field methods used to address them. From field-oriented lectures about current issues in environmental and conservation biology, students pursue research project as individuals and small groups to develop hands-on experience with field skills in conservation research and resource management. Enrollment is by application. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, ENVS 24, ENVS 100; and STAT 7 & STAT 7L (formerly AMS 7 & AMS 7L). Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151A-B-C or ENVS 109A-B-C required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, BIOE 150L, ENVS 104A or ENVS 196A.

Credits

4

Cross Listed Courses

ENVS 109D

Instructor

Donald Croll, Gage Dayton

Quarter offered

Spring

FMST 136 Organizing for Water Justice in California

Investigates, imagines, and practices movement toward water justice in California using feminist, Indigenous, and critical race theory. The course includes collaborative projects with environmental justice organizers in the Central Valley, and offers new ways of thinking about water inequity and access through racial capitalism, settler colonialism, and critical theories of place.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

CRES 136, ENVS 136

Instructor

Vivian Underhill

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Summer