Lower-Division

HIS 2A The World to 1500

Surveys the rise of complex societies: the formation of classical civilizations in Afroeurasia and the Americas, post-classical empires and cross-cultural exchange, technology and environmental change, the Mongol Empire, and oceanic voyages and the origins of the modern world.

Credits

5

Instructor

Edward Smyth

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 2B The World Since 1500

Examines major world issues over the past 500 years. Topics include European expansion and colonialism, the Muslim empires, East Asia from Ming to Qing, the Americas, Africa, the scientific-technological revolution, decolonization, and modern environmental problems. Designed primarily for first- and second-year students, it provides a time frame for understanding events within a global framework.

Credits

5

Instructor

Marc Matera

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 4 History of the Present: Investigating the Historical Origins of Contemporary Problems

Explores how historical thinking can help you understand the developments, dilemmas, and crisis that are grabbing our attention in the present. It is organized around four themes: (un)natural disasters, the politics of representation, surveillance, and borders and belonging.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jennifer Derr, Catherine Jones

General Education Code

PR-E

HIS 9 Introduction to Native American History

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Native American Studies and the Indigenous experience. Topics include: history of United States-Indian relations; colonialism; sovereignty; identity; representation of Native Americans in popular culture; and contemporary efforts toward decolonization in indigenous communities.

Credits

5

Instructor

Amy Lonetree

Offered

Spring

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 9A Native American History to 1860

Surveys the history of the indigenous peoples of North America until 1860. Introduces the diversity of Native American history and highlights the major themes of Native American history during this period.

Credits

5

General Education Code

ER

HIS 10A United States History to 1877

Focuses on the building of British American colonies and the establishment, disintegration, and reconstruction of the nation with an emphasis on how class, race, ethnicity, and gender impacted colonial development and structured the nation's agenda and the definition of citizenship.

Credits

5

Instructor

Edward Smyth

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 10B United States History, 1877 to 1977

Surveys the political, social, and cultural history of the United States from 1877 to 1977. Focuses on national politics with emphasis on how class, race, ethnicity, and gender changed the nation's agenda.

Credits

5

Instructor

Matthew Lasar

American History and Institutions

Yes

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 11A Latin America: Colonial Period

Introduces the social, cultural, economic, and political history of the New World through a close examination of the process of European conquest in the 16th century and its consequences for both native and settler peoples. Medieval and Renaissance European and African backgrounds; Inca, Maya, Aztec, plains, woodland, and tropical rainforest native American societies; processes of military and cultural conquest; epidemics and ecological changes; native resistance and the establishment of the fundamental institutions of colonial society.

Credits

5

Instructor

Maria Elena Diaz

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 11B Latin America: National Period

An introduction to the study of Latin American history from the Independence Wars in the early 19th century to the present. Topics include changing economic models of development, U.S. role, rural and urban life, women, nationalisms, populism, revolution, the military in politics, and the problem of democracy.

Credits

5

Instructor

Matthew O'Hara

General Education Code

ER

HIS 12 Introduction to Latino American History

Introduces students to the history of U.S. Latinos drawing on the experience of Central Americans, people of Mexican descent, Puerto Ricans, Dominican Americans, and Cuban Americans. Emphasizes international processes that fundamentally shape U.S. Latino communities.

Credits

5

Instructor

Grace Delgado

American History and Institutions

Yes

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 13 Introduction to American Religious Culture

Introduction to the many communities found within the American religious landscape, balancing extraordinary diversity characterizing American pluralism against the dominant religious culture. Proceeds historically, engaging major problems and developments including utopianism, the rise of evangelicalism, religion and reform, manifest destiny, secularization and modernity, and the intersection of politics and religion.

Credits

5

Instructor

Marilyn Westerkamp

General Education Code

TA

HIS 15 The United States of America from its Founding through Our Time

Takes students through five critical moments in United States history: the American Revolution, the Civil War, the New Deal, the Civil Rights era, and the years following the attack on the United States on Sept. 11, 2001. Designed for non-majors.

Credits

5

Instructor

Matthew Lasar

American History and Institutions

Yes

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Fall, Spring

HIS 20 U.S. Popular Music Movements

Focuses on the development of popular music genres in the United States and the social contexts that have produced them, from the 19th Century to the present. Promotes an understanding of how music influences and reflects our political lives.

Credits

5

Instructor

Eric Porter

General Education Code

IM

HIS 30 The Making of Modern Africa

Examines the loss and reassumption of local and state autonomy in Africa during the 19th and 20th centuries. Delineates the modalities of the colonial state and society, modes of resistance to alien occupation, and the deformation of social, class, and gender relations.

Credits

5

Instructor

David Anthony

General Education Code

ER

HIS 40A Early Modern East Asia

Surveys the history of East Asia from 1500 to 1894. Covers political, social, economic, and cultural histories of China, Japan, and Korea with the goal of perceiving a regional history that encompassed each society.

Credits

5

Instructor

Minghui Hu

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 40B The Making of Modern East Asia

A broad introductory survey of the political, social, economic, philosophical, and religious heritage of modern China, Japan, and Korea. Emphasis on the historical foundations of modern nationalism, the colonial experience, and revolutionary movements.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

HIS 41 The Making of the Modern Middle East

History of the modern Middle East from 1800 to the present, with special reference to the 20th century and forces which have shaped the area. The impact of imperialism, nationalism, and revolution in the area, with particular attention to the history of four countries: Turkey, Iran, Egypt, Israel.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jennifer Derr

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 44 Modern South Asia, 1500 to Present

Provides an introductory survey of South Asian history and society from the beginning of the 16th Century until the dawn of the 21st Century. Students gain an understanding of major events and long transformations in society, economy, culture, and politics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Juned Shaikh

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 50 When Pharaohs Reigned: The History of Ancient Egypt

Introduces the political and social history of ancient Egyptian civilization from the Predynasitic through the end of the Pharaonic period. (Formerly Pyramids and Papyrus: the History of Ancient Egypt.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Elaine Sullivan

General Education Code

CC

HIS 51 Pyramids of Earth: Religion and Symbol in the Ancient World

Investigates the use of the pyramid architectural form in ancient societies across the globe, including Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Americas, and Southeast Asia. The social, political, and religious motivation for building pyramids is explored.

Credits

5

General Education Code

IM

HIS 58 From Pirates to Refugees: The History of the Modern Mediterranean

Covers the history of the Mediterranean from the end of the Ottoman Empire to the present. It focuses on the role of empire in shaping patterns of economic and cultural exchange.

Credits

5

Instructor

Muriam Davis

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 59 The History of the English Language

Students acquire an understanding of the history of the development of the English language, from its origins to present, and engage critically with the quantitative evidence for that history, using accessible online databases and digital texts.

Credits

5

Instructor

Charles Hedrick

General Education Code

SR

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 60 Medical and Scientific Terminology

Trains students in the principals that will help them make sense of Greco-Latin scientific and technical vocabulary. Introduces Greco-Roman natural philosophy and its general cultural context, and explains the historical relationship of that tradition to the emergence of modern European experimental science and technology. (Formerly Scientific Vocabulary and the Roots of the European Scientific Tradition.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Charles Hedrick

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 61 Classical Mythology

Introduces the philosophy of myth, and surveys classical Greek mythology. Students explore the mythic mode of thinking and its distinguishing characteristics as well as the repertoire of Greek myths and their cultural contexts.

Credits

5

Instructor

Charles Hedrick

HIS 62A Classical World: Greece

An overview of Greek history from the beginnings through the Hellenistic period, with emphasis on the Archaic and Classical periods (ca. 800 B.C. through 323 B.C.).

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

HIS 62B Classical World: Rome

A lecture course offering an overview of Roman history and civilization from the legendary founding of Rome in 753 B.C. to the collapse of the Roman Empire's central administration in the West in 476 A.D.

Credits

5

Instructor

Charles Hedrick

General Education Code

CC

HIS 65A From the Martyrs to the Vikings: Medieval Europe, 200-1000

A survey of Europe from the third through 10th centuries. Emphasizes cultural conflict and assimilation (Roman and Germanic, pagan and Christian, East and West). Topics include the rise of Christianity, Germanic migrations, Byzantium and Islam, the cult of saints and relics, Vikings, and gender roles. (Formerly Medieval Europe: 200-1000.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Cynthia Polecritti

General Education Code

CC

HIS 70A Modern European History, 1500-1815

Surveys the economic, social, cultural, and political history of Europe since the late 15th century: 1500-1815. Course 70A is not a prerequisite to course 70B.

Credits

5

Instructor

Benjamin Breen

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 70B Modern European History, 1815-present

Surveys the political, social, and cultural history of Europe from the era of the Industrial Revolution to the beginning of the second millennium. Course 70A is not prerequisite to 70B.

Credits

5

Instructor

Bruce Thompson

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 71 The Holocaust: Destruction of European Jewry

Focuses on the destruction of the Jews of Europe by Nazi Germany. Issues and themes are historically grounded and include works of literature, social sciences, philosophy, and film. Online course.

Credits

5

General Education Code

ER

HIS 74 Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures

Surveys 3,000 years of Jewish history. Themes include origins of the Jews in the ancient world, formation and persistence of the Jewish diaspora, coherence and diversity of Jewish experience, Jewish narrative and textual traditions, interaction between Jews and other cultures, productive tensions between tradition and modernity in Jewish history and literature.

Credits

5

Instructor

Alma Heckman

General Education Code

ER

HIS 74A Introduction to Middle Eastern and North African Jewish History: Ancient to Early Modern

Popular media present Muslims and Jews as age-old enemies; this is far from the truth. Through primary sources, secondary texts, and films, students examine this fraught and politicized history, challenging conventional narratives of the region and its Jewish population.

Credits

5

Instructor

Alma Heckman

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 74B Introduction to Middle Eastern and North African Jewish History, 1500-2000

Surveys modern Jewish history from Morocco to Iran, 1500-2000. Studying these populations through original documents, scholarly works, and literature imparts a unique perspective on both modern Jewish history and that of the region, challenging and complementing standard narratives of each.

Credits

5

Instructor

Alma Heckman

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 75 Film and the Holocaust

Examines a series of distinguished documentary and feature films about the destruction of European Jewry. Each film is placed in its historical context, and wherever possible, the readings include the original documents on which films were based. Emphasis is placed on the strategies the filmmakers used to address the problem of representing genocide without succumbing to mere melodrama.

Credits

5

Instructor

Bruce Thompson

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 76 The Holocaust

Investigates the genocide of the Jews from 1933 to 1945 within its broader historical context, including anti-Semitism, the Great Depression, Nazi-Soviet relations, and World War II. Examines how the Holocaust unfolded in Europe as well as its impact on Jews in North Africa and the Middle East. (Formerly Hitler and the Holocaust.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Nathaniel Deutsch, Alma Heckman

General Education Code

PE-H

HIS 78 Modern Authoritarianism in Europe and Beyond

Examines modern authoritarianism and mass dictatorship as distinct political forms that promote and draw their strength from popular support and mobilization. Students study how non-democratic leaders are able to attain, exercise, perpetuate, and misuse their power.

Credits

5

Instructor

Edward Kelher

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 80C Global China

Introductory and collaborative history course that examines the social dimensions of globalization through a focus on China since 1500. Asking how China shaped and was shaped by interactions with major world regions—Europe, the Americas, and Asia—course discusses how networks of trade, imperialism, revolutions, migration, popular culture, and capitalism created significant global conjunctures and interdependencies with lasting impact. In addition, course offers instruction on how to collaborate with others effectively to achieve common goals. Students apply knowledge and techniques learned to a series of group projects.

Credits

5

General Education Code

PR-E

HIS 80X Civil Rights Movement: Grassroots Change and American Society

The civil rights movement of the 1950s-60s was one of the most important grassroots social movements in American history. Course examines this movement and its effects on American society, focusing especially on the experiences of rank-and-file participants.

Credits

5

Instructor

David Brundage

General Education Code

ER

HIS 80Y World War II Memories in the U.S. and Japan

Examines how the meaning of such issues as war origins, war responsibility, the atomic bomb, reparations, and racism have been subjects of contention in postwar U.S. and Japan. Students explore the relations between history, memory, and contemporary politics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Alice Yang, Alan Christy

General Education Code

PR-E

HIS 99 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring