PHIL - Philosophy

PHIL 8 Reason, Logic, and the Idols of Thought

Students cultivate their ability to distill and critically assess the barrage of argument and rhetoric with which they are confronted every day--on the Internet, in the media, on campus--and learn to subject their own thoughts to more rigorous, logical standards. (Formerly Logic, Numbers, and Emotion: Thinking Clearly in Everyday Life.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Jonathan Ellis

General Education Code

SR

Quarter offered

Spring

PHIL 9 Introduction to Logic

A first course in symbolic deductive logic. Major topics include (but are not limited to) the study of systems of sentential logic and predicate logic, including formal deduction, semantics, and translation from natural to symbolic languages.

Credits

5

Instructor

P. Roth, S. Hunter

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Summer

PHIL 11 Introduction to Philosophy

An introduction to the main areas of philosophy through critical reflection on and analysis of both classical and contemporary texts. Focuses on central and enduring problems in philosophy such as skepticism about the external world, the mind-body problem, and the nature of morality.

Credits

5

Instructor

A. Franklin, J. Dinishak

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter

PHIL 12 Philosophy and Film

Explores the philosophy of film through the viewing and discussionof several philosophically interesting films. Examines both the aesthetics of film and a variety of philosophical issues that particular films raise.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Summer

PHIL 13 Eastern Philosophy

Covers perspectives of Eastern philosophy; specifically, Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism. Includes views concerning the nature of ultimate reality, personal identity, morality, the afterlife, god(s), and the problem of evil.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Summer

PHIL 14 Nihilism and Film

Explores the concept of nihilism in the contemporary Western world and its relation to what might be considered a technological mindset in terms of a Nietzschean and Heideggerian interpretation. Students work through readings as well as relevant films because it may well be argued that contemporary cinema is a metaphorical mirror for our conception both of how the Western world is and how we imagine it should or might be.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Summer

PHIL 15 Technology, Knowledge, and Human Life

Provides a clearer understanding of what technology is how it relates to knowledge and human life. Students read and discuss texts by Plato, Aristotle, Husserl, and Heidegger.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Summer

PHIL 16 Hip Hop Philosophers

Examines the work of various high hop artists and philosophers. Topics may include authenticity, rebellion, identity, politics, and aesthetics, among others. Students develop understanding of relative philosophical themes and critically engage concerns through everyday experiences and art forms (such as hip hop).

Credits

5

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Summer

PHIL 19 Special Topics in Analytic Metaphysics

Introduces students to controversial topics in analytic metaphysics. Possible topics include: universals, particulars, time, causality, persistence, modality, and realism.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Summer

PHIL 22 Introduction to Ethical Theory

A consideration of ethical issues and theories focusing on the foundation of moral value and the principles governing character and behavior. Designed to extend and develop the student's abilities in philosophical reasoning about ethics.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

PHIL 23 Philosophy of Cognitive Science

Explores the philosophical issues that arise in cognitive science, particularly issues concerning the nature of minds. Students consider the idea that the mind is a digital computer, then analyze alternatives, such as connectionism and dynamics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nico Orlandi

General Education Code

PE-H

Quarter offered

Winter

PHIL 24 Introduction to Ethics: Contemporary Moral Issues

An examination of the conceptual and moral issues that arise in connection with a variety of specific ethical issues. Topics vary according to the interests of the instructor, but among those commonly discussed are: abortion, war and violence, euthanasia, world hunger, human rights, and animal rights. The readings are typically drawn from recent philosophical articles on these topics, but earlier sources (important in the history of philosophy) can be considered as well.

Credits

5

Instructor

R. Kubala

General Education Code

PE-H

Quarter offered

Winter

PHIL 26 Existentialism and After

A survey of recent movements in European thought, such as phenomenology, existentialism, hermeneutics, critical theory, continental feminism, and poststructuralism, with some attention to their 19th-century precursors. Selections from major philosophical treatises are supplemented with literary works.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Summer

PHIL 27 Business Ethics

Examination of the ethical issues that arise in connection with a variety of specific business contexts. Common topics include: advertising, environmental harm, employee-employer relationships, finance, capitalism, market failure, government regulation, work-life balance, and consumer rights.

Credits

5

Instructor

K Robertson

General Education Code

PE-H

Quarter offered

Spring

PHIL 28 Environmental Ethics

This course is an introduction to the moral issues raised by our interactions with nonhuman animals and with the rest of the natural environment. The course will relate traditional moral theories to contemporary literature on the ethics of nature conservation and environmental protection. The course is intended as a first course in philosophy as well as a first course in ethics; therefore, questions concerning the nature of philosophical inquiry and the ways in which philosophical inquiry is different from inquiries conducted within other disciplines will also be addressed.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Summer

PHIL 80B Wisdom, Love, and Wakefulness

Non-Western philosophy (primarily Eastern but also indigenous and other non-Western sources) as a lens for understanding human behavior. Emphasis on relevance to contemporary life (including personal, social, and ecological problems and potentials), connections to empirical research, and application in (and illumination through) the arts. Methodologies based in contemplative science. (Formerly Buddhism and Daoism.)

Credits

5

General Education Code

PE-H

Quarter offered

Summer

PHIL 80C Philosophy of Sex and Love

What is the nature of love? Is marriage a means of social control? Does pornography empower or oppress women? How is gender constructed? This course provides a systematic investigation of the development of Western philosophical perspectives on gender and sexuality from Ancient Greece to the 21st century. Topics include love, marriage, sexual perversion, promiscuity and monogamy, pornography, feminism, and sexual morality. Aims to promote critical reflection with regard to the ethical, political,and social implications for contemporary society. (Formerly Philosophical Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality.)

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Summer

PHIL 80E Latin American Philosophy

Is there a general school of philosophy endemic to Latin America? Would it have to appeal to quintessential Western philosophical questions regarding knowledge, values, and reality? If not, why not, and would it then still count as philosophy? What difference do ethnic and national diversity, as well as strong political and social inequality, make to the development of philosophical questions and frameworks? Course explores a variety of historically situated Latin American thinkers who investigate ethnic identity, gender, and socio-political inequality and liberation, and historical memory, and who have also made important contributions to mainstream analytical and continental philosophy.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

LALS 80E

Quarter offered

Spring

PHIL 80H Holistic Healing and Non-Western Medicine

Inquiry into the science and philosophical background of approaches that fit under the rubric of Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Medicine.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Summer

PHIL 80M Philosophical Foundations of Science Studies

Provides a philosophical perspective concerning the revolution in the understanding of science that generated the so-called science wars. Introduces the changed philosophical understanding of science shared and presupposed in the fields of science, technology, and society. (Formerly Science and Society.)

Credits

5

PHIL 80S The Nature of Science

A survey of what philosophers have said about the nature of science and scientific change. Emphasis is placed on whether science is best characterized as the gradual accumulation of truth or whether truth is irrelevant to scientific change.

Credits

5

PHIL 99 Tutorial

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHIL 100A Ancient Greek Philosophy

Survey of ancient Greek philosophy of the Classical and Hellenistic periods. Begins with Socrates and the pre-Socratics, then undertakes an intensive study of Plato and Aristotle. Course then surveys the main developments that follow: Epicureanism, Stoicism, and Skepticism.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 8 or PHIL 9; one course from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or PHIL 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements.

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

PHIL 100B The Rationalists

A study of the historical background and the present relevance of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz.

Credits

5

Instructor

Daniel Guevara

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 8 or PHIL 9; one course from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or PHIL 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements.

Quarter offered

Winter

PHIL 100C The Empiricists

A critical study (based on original texts) of Locke, Berkeley, and especially Hume on the nature of knowledge, perception, causation, morality, religion, and political society.

Credits

5

Instructor

Abraham Stone

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 8 or PHIL 9; one course from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or PHIL 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements.

Quarter offered

Spring

PHIL 106 Kant

Intensive study of Kant's philosophy, particularly his epistemology and metaphysics developed in his Critique of Pure Reason.

Credits

5

Instructor

Abraham Stone

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one course from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

Quarter offered

Winter

PHIL 107 Nineteenth-Century Philosophy

A study of some European philosophers of the 19th century, with particular attention to Hegel, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche. (Formerly course 108.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 108 Phenomenology

French phenomenology includes primarily the work of Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Additional topics include the nature of consciousness and agency. Course includes discussions of French feminists' reactions to Simone de Beauvoir and Emmanuel Levinas.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 24; PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 111 Continental Philosophy

Study of recent work in continental philosophy. Topics vary.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 112 American Philosophy

Study of classical American philosophers, specifically Emerson, Peirce, James, and Dewey, with emphasis on their views of metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and philosophy of religion. Some attention is also paid to recent pragmatic tendencies in American philosophy.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 113 The History of Analytic Philosophy

Examination of the beginnings and development of analytic philosophy, with primary interest in the reformulation of traditional philosophical problems beginning with Frege. Other figures studied include, but are not limited to, Russell, Carnap, Wittgenstein, Quine, and Sellars.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 114 Probability and Confirmation

Studies the philosophical foundations of probability, induction, and confirmation. Different interpretations of probability studied, and solutions to various problems and paradoxes investigated. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 214.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or PHIL 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 115 Formal Methods in Philosophy

Study of formal methods commonly used in analytic philosophy. Emphasis is on developing the technical tools to enable one to read and do modern analytic philosophy. Applications of various formal tools to philosophical problems will also be discussed.

Credits

5

Instructor

Richard Otte

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 116 Logic, Sets, and Functions

Introduction to basic set theory, recursive definitions, and mathematical induction. Provides a bridge between course 9 and courses 117 and 119. Strong emphasis on proving theorems and constructing proofs, both formal proofs and proofs in the customary, informal style used by mathematicians.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11, PHIL 22, PHIL 23, PHIL 24, PHIL 80E, PHIL 80G, PHIL 80M, PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 117 Non-Classical Logic

Investigations of non-classical logic. Several non-classical logics, such as various modal logics, multi-valued logics, and relevance logics studied. Meta-theoretic results investigated for each logic studied.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 118 Stoic Ethics

Surveys Stoic Ethics in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods, attending both to the theoretical writings of early Stoa (e.g., Zeno and Chrysippus) as well as to the therapeutic and protreptic writings of later figures (e.g., Seneca and Epictetus).

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 119 Intermediate Logic

Detailed treatment of the semantics of first order logic and formal computability. Completeness, undecidability of first order logic and Lowenhelm-Sklem results also proven. Nature and formal limits of computability and introduction to incompleteness also investigated. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 219.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 121 Epistemology

A sustained look at central problems in epistemology. Topics might include the problem of other minds, the nature of justification and knowledge, skepticism of the external world, the nature and limits of human rationality, the problem of induction. (Formerly Knowledge and Rationality.)

Credits

5

Instructor

P. Roth

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

Quarter offered

Fall

PHIL 122 Metaphysics

Survey of contemporary analytic metaphysics. Topics may include nominalism, metaphysical realism, and the ontological analysis of concrete particulars, including problems of modality and persistence through time.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 123 Philosophy of Language

Current theories of the nature and preconditions of language, the nature of meaning, and the nature of truth.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 124 Other Minds

An examination of the traditional philosophical problem of other minds and related contemporary scientific issues concerning what it is to encounter a mind that is not one's own and is relevantly unlike one's own.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or PHIL 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 125 Philosophy of Science

An examination of various topics that arise in thinking about science. Different philosophical problems, such as realism, instrumentalism, confirmation, explanation, space and time, and rational decision making are extensively discussed and criticized.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 126 Philosophy of Social Sciences

Examines philosophical concerns regarding the methods and assumptions of the social sciences. For example, must the methods of the social sciences differ in some important ways from those used by the natural sciences? Another issue concerns problems arising from studying groups where the very notion of rationality appears to vary from culture to culture or over historical periods.

Credits

5

Instructor

Paul Roth

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from course PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or PHIL 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

Quarter offered

Spring

PHIL 127 Philosophy of Biology

Can developmental processes be reduced to gene expression? Does the history of life exhibit trends (e.g. increasing complexity)? How are we to understand key concepts such as fitness, species, adaptation, and gene? Is there such a thing as human nature? Course surveys these and other core philosophical topics in the biological sciences.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 24; PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 130 Agony, Despair, and Desire: Philosophers of Suffering

By reading the great philosophers of the times, students receive an introduction to philosophical writing on suffering, a foundation in the traditional treatment of suffering, and an assessment of traditional accounts of suffering.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from course PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or PHIL 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

General Education Code

PE-H

PHIL 133 Philosophy of Mind

Focuses on philosophical questions concerning the nature of mind. Central topics include the relation between mind and matter, and the nature of consciousness. Other topics typically explored include: artificial intelligence; animal consciousness and intelligence; and the relation between thought and language.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 135 Philosophy of Psychology

Looks at philosophical issues raised by current research on the nature of perception, cognition, and consciousness in psychology and cognitive science or neuroscience. Can there be a science of the mind? Could machines be conscious? Do animals have minds? How did the mind evolve? These and a host of related questions form the subject matter of this course.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C. Enrollment is restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

PHIL 140 History of Ethics

A careful study of any one or a number of selected primary texts in the history of moral philosophy, with some emphasis on the relation to contemporary issues.

Credits

5

Instructor

Janette Dinishak

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

Quarter offered

Winter

PHIL 142 Advanced Ethics

An examination of central issues in ethical theory including the nature of and justification for the moral point of view, the place of reason in ethics, the status of moral principles, and the nature of moral experience.

Credits

5

Instructor

R. Kubala

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

Quarter offered

Spring

PHIL 143 Applied Ethics: Ethics Bowl

Intensive application of ethics through Ethics Bowl-style debate. Cases change annually. Students develop oral advocacy skills and are given the opportunity to compete for a position on the extracurricular Ethics Bowl team.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kyle Robertson

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

PHIL 144 Topics in Social and Political Philosophy

A study of selected classical and contemporary writings dealing with topics such as the nature and legitimacy of the liberal state, the limits of political obligation, and theories of distributive justice and rights. (Formerly Social and Political Philosophy.)

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

LGST 144

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

PHIL 147 Topics in Feminist Philosophy

Topics in feminist philosophy, which may include: the nature of feminist philosophy, feminist approaches to philosophical issues, social and political philosophy, theories of knowledge, ethics, aesthetics, and science, technology, and medicine studies. Presupposes some familiarity with philosophy or feminist scholarship.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 168

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 148 The Holocaust and Philosophy

By using the historiography of the Holocaust as a case study, examines the epistemology and ontology of historical knowledge, i.e., how the past is known, and what about it there is to know.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

PHIL 152 Aesthetics

Problems about form, meaning, and interpretation in art, as found in major aesthetic theories from the philosophical tradition, and also in a variety of encounters between recent philosophy and the arts.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 153 Philosophy of Race

Topics include conceptual-analytical and political-social issues. Selected topics may include: the ontology of race; race as real or constructed; scientific understandings of race; race and identity; and color-blind versus color-sensitive theories of justice and political policy.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from course PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or PHIL 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 171 Faith and Reason

Recent work in analytic philosophy of religion, concentrating on traditional theism. Topics include arguments for and against the existence of God, religious experience, miracles, the relation of faith and reason, and problems such as freedom and divine foreknowledge.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one course from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 180R Readings in Philosophy

Discussion-based course centered on readings in philosophy. Readings change each term and are a mixture of books, chapters from books, and articles. Prerequisite(s): One philosophy course. Enrollment by permission of instructor.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

PHIL 190 Senior Seminar

Special topics. Format varies each quarter. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; and two from PHIL 100A, PHIL 100B, and PHIL 100C. Enrollment restricted to senior philosophy majors and by permission of the instructor.

Credits

5

Instructor

P. Roth, R. Winther, J. Dinishak, J. Ellis, N. Orlandi

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHIL 195A Senior Essay

Preparation of senior essay (approximately 25 pages) during one quarter. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHIL 195B Senior Essay

Under exceptional circumstances, a second senior essay continuing the work of the first essay is permitted but only when the first senior essay has been completed. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHIL 199 Tutorial

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHIL 199F Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHIL 202 Topics in Ancient Greek Philosophy

Topics will vary each quarter and will focus on some major ancient Greek philosophical figure or work.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to philosophy graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

PHIL 203 Autism

Explores autism and its implications for various fields of inquiry, especially philosophy. Previous familiarity with autism is not presupposed. Some background in philosophy of mind, cognitive science, and psychology recommended.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

PHIL 214 Probability and Confirmation

Studies the philosophical foundations of probability, induction, and confirmation. Different interpretations of probability studied, and solutions to various problems and paradoxes investigated.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

PHIL 222 Metaphysics

Advanced introduction to topics in 20th century and contemporary analytic metaphysics. Divided into five main parts dealing, respectively, with issues about the nature of existence, properties, time, change and persistence, and material constitution.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to philosophy graduate students.

PHIL 224 Philosophy of Language

Advanced introduction to issues in the philosophy of language—primarily concerning the nature of reference, meaning, and truth. Works from such 20th-century figures as Russell, Wittgenstein, Kripke, Lewis, and Putnam discussed. Topics include what it is for a sign or a bit of language to be meaningful, or for it to identify or represent something; what it is for a statement to be truthful; what it is to be a language; and how reference works when attributed to beliefs.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to philosophy graduate students.

PHIL 231 Epistemology

May focus on topics such as naturalized epistemology, probabilistic epistemology, theories of justification, a priori knowledge, memory, and virtue epistemology. (Formerly Metaphysics and Epistemology.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to philosophy graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

PHIL 232 Advanced Topics in Value Theory

Considers topics central to philosophical questions about value: ethics, normativity, practical reason, relativism, skepticism, responsibility, motivation, emotion, and so forth. In some instances, the investigation will proceed through influential historical figures, ancient to modern.

Credits

5

Instructor

R. Kubala

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to philosophy graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

PHIL 233 Seminar in Philosophy of Mind

A study of one or more topics in contemporary philosophy of mind.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nico Orlandi

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

PHIL 235 Philosophy of Psychology

Looks at philosophical issues raised by current research on the nature of perception, cognition, and consciousness in psychology and cognitive science or neuroscience. Can there be a science of the mind? Could machines be conscious? Do animals have minds? How did the mind evolve? These and a host of related questions form the subject matter of this course.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): One course in philosophy, psychology, or linguistics. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

PHIL 237 Making Up the Mind

How does the mind come to be a thing which science can study? Readings focus on how diagnostic categories, for example, multiple personality disorder, attain scientific cachet and what issues surround the medicalization of the mind.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

PHIL 239 Philosophy of Religion

Investigation of various topics in philosophy of religion.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to philosophy graduate students or by permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

PHIL 246 Ethics, Nature, and Natural Selection

Explores the role, if any, that Darwinian theory and evolutionary biology should have on ethical theory. Topics range from classic work, including Darwin and classic expositors, to influential contemporary work on natural selection, in light of the best philosophical literature.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

BIOE 287

Instructor

Claudio Campagna, Daniel Guevara

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

PHIL 270 Research Seminar

A research seminar to develop the skills of the profession with special focus on critical reading, constructing feedback, and philosophical research and writing. Must be completed by the third year. A substantial draft of a paper is required to enroll.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jonathan Ellis

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to philosophy graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

PHIL 280 Graduate Colloquia Course

This colloquia series sponsors speakers each quarter. Students must attend all colloquia and are encouraged to form discussion groups after each lecture.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to philosophy graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHIL 281 The Pedagogy of Philosophy

Provides training for graduate students in university-level pedagogy in general and in the pedagogy of philosophy specially, under the supervision of a faculty member.

Credits

2

Instructor

C. Tibbetts, D. Guevara

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

PHIL 290A Philosophy of History

Examines issues that arise with respect to constructing histories. Inter alia, these include: the traditional philosophy of history (e.g., Hegel and Marx); modes of explanation (including narrative); the reality of the past; and underdetermination in history.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

PHIL 290C Advanced Topics in Ethics

Topics vary but the course focuses on major questions in contemporary ethical theory, or figures influential on contemporary moral philosophy. Examines different foundational ethical principles and arguments for those principles, contrasting accounts of moral action and moral motivation, as well as the epistemological and motivational role of emotions in ethical theory.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to philosophy graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

PHIL 290F Topics in Philosophy of Biology

Philosophy of biology is one of the fastest-growing areas of philosophy of science. Course is designed to give seniors and graduate students an overview of many of the diverse topics currently under discussion in modern philosophy of biology and provide a foundation for further research, regardless of previous experience with the biological sciences.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

PHIL 290H Environmental Ethics

What is our proper moral stance toward the natural environment? This question encompasses our ethical relations to individual non-human animals, to other species of living beings, and toward the biotic community as a whole. It leads us to consider the broader question: What makes anything at all worthy of our moral respect or even our moral consideration? How are we to understand the very idea of the environment, the distinction between the human world, and the natural world, and the relationships between them.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

PHIL 290J Advanced Topics in the History of Ethics

Careful study of any one of the main moral theories in the history of philosophy, with some emphasis on the relation to contemporary moral philosophy.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

PHIL 290K Philosophical Matters of Scientific Practice

Considers the relevance of philosophical matters to the practice of science. Using quantum physics as a case study, explores historical and contemporary perspectives on issues such as those raised by the Schrodinger cat paradox, Bell's inequalities, and quantum erasers.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

PHIL 290O Majors Figures in the History of Philosophy

Focuses on philosophical writings and significance of a single major figure in the history of philosophy, ancient, medieval, or modern.

Credits

5

Instructor

A. Stone

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to philosophy graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

PHIL 290P Major Figures in Contemporary Philosophy

Focuses on philosophical writings and significance of a single figure in contemporary (20th- and 21st-century) philosophy. May include, but not be limited to, Russell, Whitehead, Wittgenstein, Husserl, Carnap, Murdoch, Quine, Irigaray, Derrida, and Davidson.

Credits

5

Instructor

Paul Roth

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to philosophy graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

PHIL 290Q Philosophy of Mathematics

Introduction to the problems of contemporary analytic philosophy of mathematics. Do mathematical objects exist? Are mathematical statements true? How can we know? We will examine the historical background to contemporary debates and the positions which have been taken within them.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

PHIL 290S Topics in the Philosophy of Science

An examination of a topic in current philosophy of science. The material for the course is chosen from topics such as realism and instrumentalism, scientific explanation, space and time, the confirmation of theories, laws of nature, and scientific abstraction.

Credits

5

Instructor

J. Dinishak

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

PHIL 290W History of Consciousness

Historical study of philosophical theories of consciousness and self-consciousness. Problems include the relation of self and other, consciousness and body, and self-consciousness and ethical agency. Readings are from Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, and Heidegger, followed by phenomenologists, poststructuralists, and analytic philosophy.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

PHIL 294 Teaching-Related Independent Study

Directed graduate research and writing coordinated with the teaching of undergraduates.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHIL 295 Directed Reading

Directed reading which does not involve a term paper.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHIL 295F Readings in Philosophy

Focuses on selected philosophical areas and/or specific philosophers. Students meet with the instructor to discuss readings and deepen their knowledge on a particular subject. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHIL 296 Special Student Seminar

A seminar for graduate students arranged between students and a faculty member. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHIL 297 Independent Study

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHIL 297F Independent Study

Students submit petition to course sponsoring agency. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHIL 299 Thesis Research

Enrollment restricted to students who have advanced to candidacy.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring