Courses

AM 213 Numerical Solutions of Differential Equations

Teaches basic numerical methods for numerical linear algebra and, thus, the solution of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and partial differential equations (PDEs). Covers LU, Cholesky, and QR decompositions; eigenvalue search methods (QR algorithm); singular value decomposition; conjugate gradient method; Runge-Kutta methods; error estimation and error control; finite differences for PDEs; stability, consistency, and convergence. Basic knowledge of computer programming is needed. (Formerly AMS 213.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Hongyun Wang, Pascale Garaud, Nicholas Brummell, Qi Gong

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students or permission of instructor.

AM 290A Topics in Mathematical and Computational Biology

Focuses on applications of mathematical and computational methods with particular emphasis on advanced methods applying to organismal biology or resource management. Students read current literature, prepare critiques, and conduct projects.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ANTH 80B African Women

Survey of the position and roles of women in African societies with different social, political, and economic organizations.

Credits

5

Instructor

Carolyn Shaw

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 80C Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

Introductory level course in basic analysis of human remains for the medico-legal profession. Course covers development of the field of forensic anthropology, introduction to human osteology, how age, sex, ancestry, and stature are determined from skeletel material, and how skeletel trauma is evaluated.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

ANTH 80D Africa Today

Present-day values and social life of selected sub-Saharan African people examined using anthropological studies and African literature.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Summer

ANTH 80E Anthropology of Science

Uses anthropological concepts and skills to critically interrogate the ways in which people and social groups are involved in creating, critiquing, and negotiating various aspects of science and technology.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jessica O'Reilly

Quarter offered

Summer

ANTH 80F Exotic Tours

Explores exotic (including extreme, adventure, ethnic, and eco) tourism and journalism using writings, photography, and web sites. It is, in effect, a series of virtual exotic tours, each one centered around an itinerary drawn from actual tours. Will be offered in the 2008-09 academic year.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 80I Culture and Power in Latin America

Introduces key issues in the anthropology of Latin America, with emphasis on identity formation, cultural practices, and power. Major themes include race, class, and gender as intersecting forms of oppression, violence, and terror and indigenous social movements.

Credits

5

Instructor

Guillermo Delgado-P

ANTH 80J Introduction to Visual Culture

Introduces current issues in cultural anthropology using film as a medium with which to explore culture. Raises questions about visual representations and the portrayal of cultural difference in the context of global inequalities.

Credits

5

Instructor

Shelly Errington

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 80L Biology of Everyday Life

Addresses cross-cultural attitudes to the human body and its everyday biological concerns—sleeping, eating, breathing, sex, and defecation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Matthew Wolf-Meyer

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 80M Healing and Culture

Examines traditional medicine, ethnomedicine, alternative healing, and biomedicine as cultural systems in both local and transnational contexts.

Credits

5

ANTH 80N Anthropology of Globalization

Introduces anthropological concepts and approaches to historical and contemporary globalizations. Using ethnographies, films, and other cultural productions, raises questions about the impacts of transnational capitalism, colonialism, migration/movement, and media on local and global identities, cultures, and communities.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

ANTH 80O Environmental Politics

A survey course on anthropological approaches to environmental questions that covers the history of anthropology's engagement with environmental politics. Considers the various ecologies, cultural, symbolic, historical, political, and the types of analyses these have enabled.

Credits

5

ANTH 80S Anthropology of Drugs

Explore cultures and politics of drug use, development, and science. Analyze the deeply racial and national character of drug science as well as ways that licit and illicit drugs construct bodies and body-politics.

Credits

5

Instructor

John Marlovits

Quarter offered

Summer

ANTH 80U Culture and Religion: Alien-Nation and Outer Space

Examines contemporary American religious rhetorics and narratives as they register and constitute the transition to late modern capitalist culture. Topics vary each year and include born-again Christianity, apocalypticism, New Age, UFOs, and alien abductions.

Credits

5

ANTH 80Y Power, Politics, and Protest

Examines the many ways in which organized groups engage in political protest against those whom they understand to dominate them. The course first establishes the framework for the discussion of power, politics, and protest, and then examines a variety of forms taken by political protests worldwide.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

ANTH 80Z The Good Life

Examines cultural constructions of meaningful living, with emphasis on ethnographic analysis, through comparative studies of how societies assign value to different formations of everyday life. Topics include: cultivation of taste; pleasure; hierarchies of values; social justice; and distinctions between work and leisure.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 82 Culture and Dance of Bollywood

Devoted to the culture and dance of Bollywood, a popular genre of film representation of cultures and peoples of India. The course combines both theory and practice by showing films on selected themes and having students learn this dance style and music.

Credits

2

Instructor

Annapurna Pandey

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 99 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 100L Video Laboratory

This video production lab trains students in the techniques of ethnographic filmmaking. Through lectures, demonstrations, hands-on instruction, and a continuous review of the students' work in progress, students learn the fundamentals of video pre-production, production, and post-production techniques.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ANTH 101E Human Evolution Laboratory

Laboratory focuses on the locomotor, dental, facial-cranial anatomy of hominids. Meets weekly, with exercises designed around primate and human skeletal materials and casts of fossil hominids. Will be offered in the 2008-09 academic year.

Credits

2

Instructor

Adrienne Zihlman

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in ANTH 101 is required.

ANTH 103B Forensic Anthropology and Bioarchaeology

Introduces the analysis of human remains from forensic or archaeological contexts. Covers the whole range of morphological, morphometric, histological, genetic, and biochemical methods applied in bone-based anthropological analyses. Prerequisite(s): course 102A. Enrollment by permission of instructor.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 106E Primate Behavior Laboratory

Focuses on locomotor and dental-cranial anatomy and skeletal/dental development of primates. Weekly meetings, with exercises designed around primate materials.

Credits

2

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in ANTH 106.

ANTH 108 Neanderthals

Homo sapiens neanderthalensis (neanderthals), once considered brutish, are increasingly seen as behaviorally modern. This course uses primary academic research to explore the social behaviors, technology, anatomy, and genetics of neanderthals, gaining a holistic understanding of our closest ancestor.

Credits

5

Instructor

Joseph Reti

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 110 Comparative Functional Anatomy

Comparative and evolutionary anatomy of human performance. Examines locomotor systems and their underlying structure and evolution through videos, skeletons, and dissections in a variety of mammals, primates, and humans. Students are billed a course materials fee. (Formerly Anthropology of Movement.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Adrienne Zihlman

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 102A or ANTH 107 or ANTH 185; or by interview.

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 110J Encounter Studies

Through close reading of ethnographic scholarship and some literature, this course examines how cultures and societies are shaped through encounters: everyday social interactions across difference, colonial conquest, place-making projects, boundaries and intimacies, and capitalist relations.

Credits

5

Instructor

Gillian Bogart

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Summer

ANTH 110V Virtual Values: The Cultural Politics of Information Technology

Examines social, political, and cultural implications of technology, with an emphasis on information technology and its relationship to capitalism in the U.S. Draws on theories of capitalism and technology, commodities and affective labor, ethnographies of technological workplaces, and other histories.

Credits

5

Instructor

Caroline Kao

General Education Code

PE-T

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 110Z Infrastructure: Designing and Hacking Power in the Everyday

Draws on contemporary theory and ethnographies to understand infrastructures as cultural phenomena for addressing everyday human needs, as well as an analytical tool for addressing concepts such as materialism, inequality, structure and resistance, history, and potentiality.

Credits

5

Instructor

Zahirah Suhaimi

General Education Code

PE-T

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 118 Globalization of Development

Globalization has become a fashionable concept. How is globalization related to development promoted by every nation-state in the world? Course explores such questions through a diverse body of literature and service learning conducted in urban and rural Odisha, India.

Credits

5

Instructor

Annapurna Pandey

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Summer

ANTH 118L Globalization of Development Laboratory

Students learn about and participate in each project offered at Centurion and write a weekly two-page report on each week's assignment.

Credits

2

Instructor

Annapurna Pandey

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Summer

ANTH 130D Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East

Religion, culture, and change in the Middle East with emphasis on the Arab world.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 130K Politics and Culture in East Asia

Introduces scholarship that rethinks the conventional wisdom about colonialism and modernity in China, Japan, and Korea. Emphasis on the production of colonial knowledge about Asian others and genealogies of nationalism, tradition/modernity, history/memory, race and gender. Will be offered in the 2005–06 academic year.

Credits

5

ANTH 130Q Mejicanos in Anthropological Discourse

Provides students with an opportunity to critically analyze various ethnographic accounts of Mexican communities on both sides of the border. Uncovers how anthropologists in this century have approached Mexican culture by examining the methodologies, theories, evidence, and conclusions employed and/or produced in these works.

Credits

5

Instructor

Olga Najera Ramirez

ANTH 130R Provincializing America

Addresses matters of postcolonialism, transnationalism, and sovereignty in the context of the U.S.'s changing status at the turn of the 21st century. Will be offered in 2011–12 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Matthew Wolf-Meyer

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 132 Photography and Anthropology

Moving historically from woodcuts and paintings to the World Wide Web, but emphasizing the invention and development of documentary photography, this course explores the world of images depicting society and culture. Major theoretical approaches to reading pictures will be emphasized, and students must produce a final project incorporating visual images.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2 or HAVC 10D or HAVC 10E or HAVC 10F or HAVC 10G or ART 30.

General Education Code

IM

ANTH 141 Anthropology of Developing Countries: Environment, Water, Entropy

Focuses on developing countries, those countries experiencing fast deruralization and ecological crises. Students learn the reach of entropic interconnectiveness given the fact that forms of inequality organize the system. Readings illustrate the theories and methods anthropologists use to approximate cultural realities to readers, scholars, and activists.

Credits

5

Instructor

Guillermo Delgado-P

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 149E Video Laboratory

Trains students in the techniques of ethnographic filmmaking. Through lectures, demonstrations, hands-on instruction, and review of students' work in progress, students learn the fundamentals of film/video pre-production, production, and post-production skills. Concurrent enrollment in course 149 required.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 154 Multimedia Ethnography

Students learn the fundamentals of photography or video production and audio recording in order to create mini-ethnographies.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3. Concurrent enrollment in ANTH 154L is required. Enrollment restricted to anthropology majors.

General Education Code

PR-C

ANTH 154L Multimedia Laboratory

Designed to instruct in aesthetics and technical production of a short digital slideshow. Using iMovie3 editing program, produce a digital slideshow incorporating sound (narration, music, and sound effects) and still images.

Credits

2

Requirements

is Concurrent enrollment in ANTH 154 required.

ANTH 167 Practicing Folklore

Designed to provide students with a demonstrated interest or background in folkloristics an opportunity to develop a project that integrates folkloristic theory and ethnographic practice. Will be offered in the 2006–07 academic year.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2. Enrollment restricted to anthropology majors.

ANTH 168 Self and Identity

Examines anthropological treatments of self and identity with attention to the related topics of consciousness and agency. Surveys theories, key debates, and important ethnographic case studies. Will be offered in the 2004–05 academic year.

Credits

5

ANTH 175A Early African Archaeology

Archaeological history of Africa from the first 2.5 million-year-old artifacts to the emergence of African pastorialism and farming. Disciplinary models and assumptions critically examined in their historic and political contexts. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 275A. (Formerly African Archaeology: 2.5 Million BP to Farming.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3 or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior anthropology and Earth sciences/anthropology combined majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 175C African Diaspora

Introduces the African diaspora from an archaeological perspective. Focuses on examining the cultural, social, economic, and political lives of Africans and their descendants in the New World and West Africa from the 15th through 19th centuries. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Anthropology 275C.

Credits

5

Instructor

James Monroe

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 3; ANTH 175A and ANTH 175B strongly recommended.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 183 Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Archaeology

An introduction to the use of statistics and other formal methods in solving archaeological problems. Teaches basic interests, terms, and concepts important in quantitative archaeological thought through lectures, assigned readings, problem sets, and in-class discussions. Will be offered in 2010–11 academic year.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1 or ANTH 3.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 188 Practicum in Archaeology

Introduces practical skills in archaeological materials identification of stone, shell, bone, and other materials; curation; and database management. Students receive entry-level training with once-weekly class meetings and 5 hours per week of hands-on instruction.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter

ANTH 190A Primate Field Ecology: Tropical Forest Ecology

Explores tropical forest ecology with emphases on plant-life history variation and patterns of diversity. Topics include: photosynthesis, competition, and plant-animal interactions, such as pollination, herbivory, and seed dispersal. Special focus on neotropical forests and adaptations to life in humid environments. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 290A. Competitive selection based on application and interview during previous fall quarter. Will be offered in 2011-12 academic year. Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; concurrent enrollment in courses 190B and 190C is required.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nathaniel Dominy

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 190B Primate Field Ecology: Field Methods in Primatology

Field-oriented course in primate behavioral ecology. Combines lectures on approaches and methodologies with practical field studies. Students complete field project in primate ecology and behavior and learn natural history of the plants and animals of Costa Rica. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 290B. Competitive selection based on application and interview during previous fall quarter. Will be offered in 2011-12 academic year. Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; concurrent enrollment in courses 190A and 190C is required. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nathaniel Dominy

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 190C Primate Field Ecology: Independent Field Research

Students carry out substantial field projects at two locations in Costa Rica under the supervision of course instructors. Students develop research proposals, analyze data, and prepare final research papers and oral presentations. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 290C. Competitive selection based on application and interview during previous fall quarter. Will be offered in 2011-12 academic year. Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; concurrent enrollment in courses 190A and 190B is required.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nathaniel Dominy

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 191 Archaeological Field Research

Introduces archaeological field methods and approaches by which archaeology and heritage are interpreted. Students obtain a working understanding of survey and excavation, artifact sampling, and laboratory analysis. Enrollment by permission of instructor. Students are billed a course fee.

Credits

6

Instructor

Chelsea Blackmore

Quarter offered

Summer

ANTH 192 Directed Student Teaching

Teaching of a lower-division seminar under faculty supervision. (See course 42.) Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 193 Field Study

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ANTH 193M Field Study in Medical Anthropology

Introduces fieldwork methods and problems in medical anthropology. Students spend six weeks conducting field work through volunteer activities with local health organizations, and prepare a final ethnographic paper.

Credits

5

Instructor

Matthew Wolf-Meyer

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 134.

Quarter offered

Summer

ANTH 194V Picturing Cultures

A historical, analytical, and practical exploration of the uses of still and moving pictures in ethnographic representations, research, and production.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3; and ANTH 80J, ANTH 120, ANTH 132, or ANTH 154; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior anthropology majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 196A Archaeology of the American Southwest

Outlines development of Native cultures in the American Southwest from Paleo-Indian times through early European contact. Students must enroll in courses 196A and 196B. Students cannot receive credit for courses 196A-B and 194I.

Credits

3

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, and ANTH 3; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to anthropology majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 196B Archaeology of the American Southwest

Outlines development of Native cultures in the American Southwest from Paleo-Indian times through early European contact. Students must enroll in courses 196A and 196B. Students cannot receive credit for courses 196A-B and 194I.

Credits

3

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1, ANTH 2, ANTH 3, ANTH 196A; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to anthropology majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 202B Dental Anthropology

Focuses on human dentition, exploring development, morphology, identification of teeth and tooth fragments and thin-section microanatomy. Dental anomalies and pathology will be reviewed. The archaeological and forensic context for interpretation of information from the dentition will be addressed.

Credits

5

ANTH 203 Forensic Anthropology

Provides training in techniques used in identifying biological profile from the skeleton, assessing the trauma, and estimating time since death. Impact of legal context in which these assessments are made paramount to this course.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 208B Topical Seminar in Ethnographic Practice

Graduate-level advanced seminar in ethnographic practice. Practice and critique of ethnographic research methods; analysis of how research sites are constructed. Topics and themes change yearly. Requirements include ethnographic fieldwork and writing. Will be offered in the 2004–05 academic year.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 200A. Enrollment is restricted to anthropology graduate students.

ANTH 209 Life Histories

Examines biological and social markers of infant to mature and aged adult stages through life history. Compares and discusses timing and pattern of life history in humans across species, with examples from contemporary and historical societies.

Credits

5

Instructor

Adrienne Zihlman

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 210 Comparitive Functional Anatomy

Comparative and evolutionary anatomy of human performance examines locomotor systems and their underlying structure and evolution through videos, skeletons, and dissection in a variety of mammals, primates, and humans with applications to the fossil record. Will be taught in 2010–11 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Adrienne Zihlman

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 217 Colonial Discourse

Examines the production of ethnographies in the colonial period through critical interpretations of the structure of colonial authority, imagination, and communities built on asymmetries of race, class, gender, and sexuality. The role of nationalism in shaping the postcolonial response to this literature is also examined.

Credits

5

ANTH 227 Life History Narratives in Anthropology

Seminar analyzing life history narratives in anthropology. Requires students to collect life history materials through fieldwork. Constructions of concepts in the history of anthropology, such as individual, self, person, subjectivity, and identity are discussed.

Credits

5

ANTH 237 Cross-Border Ethnographies

Explores classic and contemporary works on Mexicans in the U.S. and Mexico by putting into dialogue scholars on both sidees of the border. Examines other approaches to culture including feminist and cultural studies. Ability to read in Spanish highly desirable.

Credits

5

ANTH 239 Narrative Culture

This seminar examines various approaches to narrative culture—myths, metanarratives, narrative fields, cultural narratives, stories, storytelling, and narrative enactments—from anthropology, cultural studies, and literary studies. Will be offered in the 2004–05 academic year.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 240 Anthropology and Poststructuralism

This course traces an ongoing dialogue between poststructuralist theories and texts and the disciplines of anthropology. The course will pay particular attention to the philosophy of Michel Foucault; in addition, the influences of Derrida, Levinas, Barthes, and Bourdieu will be discussed. Will be offered in the 2005–06 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Lisa Rofel

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 242 Writing Ethnography

Seminar examines ethnography as a genre of writing and as a workshop of cultural production. Looks at changes in the anthropological genre of ethnography over the last 100 years and compares the anthropological genre with related genres.

Credits

5

Instructor

Susan Harding

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 244 Science, Medicine, and Technology

Engages in critical studies of medicine, science, and technology from an anthropological perspective. Recent ethnographic research will examine configurations of knowledge and practice with special attention to social justice, community interventions, and the study up of institutions. Will be offered in the 2006–07 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nancy Chen

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 245 Culture and Mind

Examines theoretical intersections of anthropology and psychology. Topics include psychoanalytic and cognitive approaches to culture theory, the psychic unity debate, language and cognition, cultural models, and current controversies in psychological anthropology. Will be offered in the 2005–06 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Daniel Linger

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 248L Video Laboratory

Trains students in the use of electronic and photographic media for the acquisition of field data. Through lectures, demonstrations, field exercises, and review of students' media exercises, students will learn the fundamentals of photography, video production, and audio recordings in the field.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ANTH 250 Dissertation Writing

Course devoted entirely to the process of writing a dissertation. Students work on their dissertations, post-fieldwork, at various stages, ranging from beginning stages of making an outline to middle stages of drafting chapters to final stages of revision. Emphasis placed upon initial stages of organizing field materials into themes for chapters. Will be offered in the 2004–05 academic year.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ANTH 251 Globalization and Identity in Latin America

Explores theoretical and ethnographic analysis of globalization and transnationalism as processes that shape conditions of struggle around livelihood, culture, and identity in the Americas. Focuses on key themes of production, consumption, transnationalism, and social movements. Will be offered in the 2006–07 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mark Anderson

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 256 International Developmental Aid

Explores theoretical and methodological issues in the field of international development, with an emphasis on ethnographic analysis. Topics include hierarchies of value, altruism and philanthropy, geographies of dependency and responsibility, ethics of compassion, and public anthropology. Will be offered in 2011–12 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Melissa Caldwell

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 257 Cultures of Science, Science as Culture

What makes the anthropology of science particular? To pose this question and seek answers, course considers early and contemporary ethnographies of science, medicine, and technology alongside contributions by philosophers of science. Will be offered in 2011–12 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Matthew Wolf-Meyer

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 271 Anthropology of Dead Persons

Cross-disciplinary examination of death and the dead person in various cultures, past and present. Topics include cultural constructions of death, dead bodies and dead persons in contemporary and archaeological perspectives, rights pertaining to dead bodies in the U.S. legal system, use of cadavers in education, forensics of dead persons in mass disasters and human rights cases, indigenous rights and repatriation. Will be offered in the 2006–07 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Diane Gifford-Gonzalez, Alison Galloway

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Enrollment is restricted to anthropology graduate students or by permission of instructor.

ANTH 275A Seminar on Early African Archaeology

Tutorial on archaeology of Africa, from 2.5 million years ago to emergence of African pastoralism and farming. Weekly examination of disciplinary models and assumptions in historic context, emphasizing overarching themes in prehistoric archaeology. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 175A. (Formerly Tutorial on African Archaeology.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students or by consent of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 275C Tutorial in African Diaspora Archaeology

Graduate tutorial on African diaspora archaeology. Focuses on the cultural, social, economic, and political lives of Africans and their descendants in the New World and West Africa from the 15th through 19th centuries. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 175C. Will be offered in the 2009–2010 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

James Monroe

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 275D Issues in Africanist Archeology

Advanced readings and discussion in Africanist archaeology. Focus to be guided by the needs of advanced students. This course does not replace the 275-series and should only be taken by students who have successfully completed at least one of these courses. Will be offered in the 2009–2010 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Diane Gifford-Gonzalez

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 275A or ANTH 275B or ANTH 275C. Enrollmentis restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ANTH 276D Archaeology of the Peopling of the Americas

Using a multidisciplinary approach, examines physical geology, paleoenvironment, human biology, linguistics, and culture history of Americas at end of last Ice Age. Particular emphasis on reconstructing timing, routes, and context of first peopling of the American continents. Taught in conjunction with Earth Sciences 276. Students cannot receive credit for both courses.

Credits

5

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 277 Tutorial on European Conquest of the Americas

Uses ethnographic, archaeological, and historical sources to examine clash of cultures between Native Americans and Europeans during the 15th through 19th centuries. Emphasizes critical analyses of social, political, and demographic impacts of contact on Native American societies. Will be offered in the 2009–2010 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 281 Landscape Archaeology

Graduate seminar on contemporary archaeological perspectives about space and landscape. Focuses on archaeological contributions to understanding economic, cultural, and political factors that shape human perception, use, and construction of the physical world. Will be taught in 2010–11 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

James Monroe

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 286 Zooarchaeological Research Design

Seminar on research design in zooarchaeology using archaeological monographs and clusters of related research papers. Students produce a research design in the form of a draft NSF research proposal based on the use of archaeofaunal materials. Will be offered in 2011–12 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Diane Gifford-Gonzalez

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 284; or an equivalent advanced course on zooarchaeological theory and method, and permission of the instructor. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 288 Gender and Archaeology

Seminar on the use of concepts of gender, sex, and sexuality in archaeological analysis and sociopolitics, reviewing antecedents in the general anthropological literature, the first critiques of androcentrism, and more recent research incorporating gender in analysis, as well as the impacts of archaeological sociopolitics on persons of different genders and sexual preferences. Will be offered in the 2008–2009 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Diane Gifford-Gonzalez

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 289 Writing in the Anthropological Sciences

Worshop on writing styles in anthropological sciences, including specialized, general anthropological, and mainstream scientific journals, monographs, and public education pieces. Cultivates flexible writing skill through comparative analysis of data presentation and rhetoric, with drafts in different formats. Will be taught in 2010–11 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Diane Gifford-Gonzalez

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 290A Primate Field Ecology: Tropical Forest Ecology

Tropical forest ecology with emphases on plant-life history variation and patterns of diversity. Topics include: photosynthesis, competition, and plant-animal interactions, such as pollination, herbivory, and seed dispersal. Special focus on neotropical forests and adaptations to life in humid environments. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 190A. Competitive selection based on application and interview during previous fall quarter. Will be offered in 2011–12 academic year. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. Concurrent enrollment in courses 290B and 290C required.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nathaniel Dominy

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 290B Primate Field Ecology: Field Methods in Primatology

Field-oriented course in primate behavioral ecology. Combines lectures on approaches and methodologies with practical field studies. Students complete field project in primate ecology and behavior and learn natural history of the plants and animals of Costa Rica. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 190B. Competitive selection based on application and interview during previous fall quarter. Will be offered in 2011–12 academic year. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. Concurrent enrollment in courses 290A and 290C required. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nathaniel Dominy

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 290C Primate Field Ecology: Independent Field Research

Students carry out substantial field projects at two locations in Costa Rica under the supervision of course instructors. Students develop research proposals, analyze data, and prepare final research papers and oral presentations. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 190C. Competitive selection based on application and interview during previous fall quarter. Will be offered in 2011–12 academic year. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. Concurrent enrollment in courses 290A and 290B required.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nathaniel Dominy

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 294A History of Evolutionary Theory

History of ideas about evolution as a process, with a focus on human evolution from Darwin's methods and contributions through genetics, paleontology, and the modern evolutionary synthesis, concluding with the impact of molecular data on understanding of evolution today. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 194A. Will be offered in the 2008–2009 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Adrienne Zihlman

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

ANTH 294L Advanced Topics in Southwest Prehistory

Advanced overview of Native cultures in the American Southwest from Paleo-Indian times through early European contact. Completion of undergraduate course in North American archaeology is strongly recommended. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 194L. Will be offered in the 2008–2009 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Judith Habicht Mauche

Requirements

Completion of undergraduate course in North American archaeology is strongly recommended. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ANTH 294W Evolution of Human Sensory Systems

Focuses on origins, diversity, and accuity of primate senses with emphasis on field techniques, primate evolution and morphology, and cultural innovations in modern human society. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 194W.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

ANTH 294Y Palaeolithic Prehistory

Covers the first 2.49 million years of the archaeological evidence for hominid life in Africa and Eurasia, emphasizing archaeological data as indirect evidence for the ecological and social context of hominid evolution. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 194Y.

Credits

5

ART 80C Introduction to Visual Arts

Surveys the major art forms and critical ideas that have shaped artistic practice globally from the 1980s to the present, including the many cultural forces that have inspired artists to articulate human experience in visual form.

Credits

5

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Spring

ART 100 Gallery/Museum Practices

Focuses on providing practical experience in all phases of exhibition design and implementation. General tasks of program operation supplemented with selective reading and written assignments designed to enhance theoretical understanding of broader issues in art administration. Includes field trips to galleries and museums as well as in-class visits by artists and arts professionals. (Formerly Gallery/Museum Management and Practices.)

Credits

2

Instructor

Shelby Graham

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to art, pre-art, and history of art and visual culture majors.

Quarter offered

Summer

ART 149A Contemporary Visual Media: Issues of Theory and Practice

Examines selected issues in critical theory relevant to contemporary visual practices through writing assignments and class discussions of core readings. Specifically, thematically explores the relationship between visual art and film aesthetics.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Quarter offered

Fall

ART 149B Contemporary Visual Media: Issues of Theory and Practice

Examines selected issues in critical theory relevant to contemporary visual practices through writing assignments and class discussions of core readings. Specifically, focuses on the creative process: How do artists work and what informs their production?

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Quarter offered

Fall

ART 150C Critical Issues in Contemporary Art

This writing-specific course is concerned with the role of the artist in society and offers a comprehensive overview of contemporary thought within the visual arts from an international perspective. Special emphasis placed on current trends and shifts in artistic production, theory, and criticism, and on art works that are artistically and intellectually inventive, as well as those that produce controversial and often challenging results.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior art majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

ART 152 Controversies in Art

Focuses on several United States art exhibitions that have generated political and social controversy. Students will critically examine the curatorial visions, art, exhibition reviews, public and institutional responses, and broader cultural, historical, and political context that surrounded the controversies.

Credits

5

Instructor

Edith Crichton

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Quarter offered

Spring

ASTR 14 Observational Astronomy

Intended for science majors and qualified non-science majors. Knowledge of high school physics and an understanding of mathematics at the Math 2 level required.

Credits

5

ASTR 70 Honors Undergraduate Seminar in Astrophysical Research

Explores current problems in astrophysical research and how they are being solved by practicing scientists. Each presentation-discussion focuses on a different problem or question, explaining how the problem relates to broader astronomical issues, describing the methods used to solve the problem and reviewing the hoped for, or anticipated outcome. Intended for students considering a career in the physical sciences.

Credits

2

Instructor

Graeme Smith, S Faber

Quarter offered

Fall

ASTR 80B Light, Color, and Vision

Covers a variety of optical and visual phenomena, including the nature of light, optical effects in the atmosphere, the camera and photography, simple optical instruments, the human eye and vision, binocular vision, and color and color perception.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Quarter offered

Fall

ASTR 115 Spacetime Geometry and Cosmology

The structure and dynamics of the big bang and the expanding universe; spacetime structure, special relativity and the curved spacetime of general relativity; observations of quasars, galaxies, radio sources, and the microwave background.

Credits

5

ASTR 207 Future Directions/Future Missions

Examines possible key science goals for the next decade, such as planet detection, galaxy formation, and dark energy cosmology; the means for addressing these goals, such as new space missions and/or ground-based facilities; and the political, technical, and scientific constraints on such research. Looks at the role of the Decadel Survey. Examines a few existing programs (DEEP, ALMA, SNAP, NGST) as examples.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

ASTR 209 Physical Principles of Atomic and Molecular Structure

The elementary quantum mechanics underlying atomic and molecular structure, with applications to astronomical spectroscopy.

Credits

5

ASTR 212 Dynamical Astronomy

Surveys dynamical processes in astrophysical systems on scales ranging from the planetary to the cosmological, stability and evolution of planetary orbits, scattering processes and the few-body problem, processes in stellar clusters, spiral structure and galactic dynamics, galactic collisions, and evolution of large-scale structure.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ASTR 220B Star Formation

Theory and observations of star formation. Observational techniques used to study star formation, particularly millimeter line and continuum observations, and infrared, visible, and UV star-formation tracers. Physics of giant molecular clouds and galaxy-scale star formation. Gravitational instability, collapse, and fragmentation. Pre-main sequence stellar evolution. Protostellar accretion disks and jets. Radiative feedback and HII regions. (Formerly Star and Planet Formation)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ASTR 220A.

Quarter offered

Fall

ASTR 220C Advanced Stages of Stellar Evolution and Nucleosynthesis

The evolution of massive stars beyond helium burning; properties of white dwarf stars; physics and observations of novae, supernovae, and other high energy stellar phenomena; nuclear systematics and reaction rates; the origin and production of all the chemical elements.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ASTR 220A. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

ASTR 223 Planetary Physics

Survey of interiors, atmospheres, thermal evolution, and magnetospheres of planets, with focus on the astronomical perspective. Course covers exoplanets and solar system planets, both giant and terrestrial, with attention to current and future observations.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ASTR 231 Diffuse Gas In and In Between Galaxies

Examines the observational data and theoretical concepts related to the interstellar medium (gas inside galaxies); intracluster medium (gas in between galaxies in clusters); and intergalactic medium (gas in between field galaxies). Emphases on the inferred physical conditions of this gas and its implications for cosmology and processes of galaxy formation.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ASTR 232 High Energy Astrophysics

Elements of cosmology including Newtonian cosmology, curved spaces, observational tests, microwave background, and the early universe. Cosmic rays, their origin, propagation, and radiation. Supernovae and the physics of pulsars.

Credits

5

ASTR 235 Numerical Techniques

Gives students a theoretical and practical grounding in the use of numerical methods and simulations for solving astrophysical problems. Topics include N-body, SPH and grid-based hydro methods as well as stellar evolution and radiation transport techniques.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

ASTR 237 Accretion Processes

Theories of spherical accretion, structure and stability of steady-state accretion disks, and the evolution of time-dependent accretion disks. Applications of these theories to the formation of the solar system as well as the structure and evolution of dwarf novae and X-ray sources are emphasized.

Credits

5

ASTR 240B High Redshift Galaxies

Galaxy formation and evolution from observations of intermediate-to-high redshift galaxies (z 0.5-5). Complements and builds on 240A. Cluster galaxies and field galaxies. Foundation from classic papers on distant galaxies. Recent discoveries from IR and sub-mm measurements. Impact of AGNs and QSOs. Overview of modeling approaches. Identify theoretical and observational issues.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

ASTR 253 Stellar Dynamics

Kinematics and relaxation of stellar systems. Potential and orbit theories. Dynamics of globular clusters, spiral and elliptical galaxies. Dynamical friction, mergers, and galactic cannibalism. Galaxy clustering in the early universe.

Credits

5

Instructor

Douglas Lin

ASTR 255 Stellar Populations

A study of stellar populations in our own and in external galaxies with particular reference to theories of galaxy formation and evolution. Variable star properties, element abundances, nucleosynthetic histories, and dynamical properties of various stellar populations.

Credits

5

ASTR 256 Infrared Astronomy

Techniques and results of infrared observations. Physical nature of infrared sources.

Credits

5

ASTR 275 Radio Astronomy

Theory and practice of radio telescopes, radiometers, and data handling systems. Principles of aperture synthesis. Theory of continuum and line radio emission mechanisms, and application to actual astronomical observations. Galactic radio sources, quasars, and pulsars. Offered occasionally.

Credits

5

Instructor

Stephen Thorsett

ASTR 289S Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems

Theory of star formation. Evolution of the sun. Physics of the solar nebula. Origin and evolution of the nebula. Formation of the giant planets and the terrestrial planets. Observational approaches to the discovery of other planetary systems.

Credits

5

BIOC 80A Understanding Drugs

Scientific information on prescription and non-prescription drugs and drugs of abuse is presented. Covers basic pharmacological concepts, the underlying science behind various disorders and the drugs that are used to treat these disorders. Some drugs covered include common pain relievers, allergy and respiratory drugs, vitamins, gastrointestinal drugs, contraceptives, caffeine, drugs for mental illness, diet drugs, alcohol, drugs in sports, and drugs of abuse.

Credits

5

Instructor

Glenn Eberhart

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOC 150A Principles of Pharmacology and Toxicology I

Part one of a three-quarter sequence. Presents the basic principles of pharmacology and toxicology, beginning with the concepts governing both the environmental fate and biological actions of bioactive chemicals. Included are physicochemical properties, environmental transport and reaction mechanisms, dose-response relationships, chemical-receptor dynamics, disposition kinetics, biotransformation, and metabolic induction and inhibition.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOC 150B Pharm & Tox II

Pharm & Tox II

Credits

5

BIOC 150C Principles of Pharmacology and Toxicology III

Part three of a three-quarter sequence. Presents the various sites and mechanisms of action, pharmacologic and toxicologic effects, and pathologic changes produced by important classes of drugs and toxicants in biological systems. Included are agents active on the central and peripheral nervous systems, anesthesia, psychopharmacology, cardiovascular and respiratory function actions, new chemical evaluation, and risk assessment.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOC 150L Pharmacology and Toxicology Laboratory I

Part one of a three-quarter sequence. Presented in seminar-laboratory format, explores the various in vitro and in vivo tools utilized in the preclinical discovery and development of drugs and toxic agents. The lab sessions involve demonstrations, hands-on exercises, and field trips to industry laboratories. Lab animal studies are integral to the drug development and approval process. Since this is a highly regulated activity, emphasizes sound lab animal management and use issues and skills.

Credits

2

BIOE 3 Concepts in Biology

A non-survey course suitable for people who have not had biology. A historical and experimental approach covers five key biological concepts: homeostasis, the integration of structure and function, cell theory, the mechanism of heredity, and evolution. Students cannot receive credit for this course after receiving prior credit for BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, or BIOE 20C. (Formerly Biology 3.) Prerequisite(s): completion of biology placement exam recommended, http://biosci.ucsc.edu/bioplacex.html.

Credits

5

Instructor

Baldo Marinovic

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

BIOE 21B Accelerated Development and Physiology

An accelerated introduction to topics in the organismal biology of plants and animals, covering morphology, anatomy, physiology, and development. Biology 21B counts as the equivalent of Biology 20B for prerequisites and major requirements. Prerequisite(s): grade (or equivalent performance level) of A in course 20A, or grade (or equivalent performance level) of A or B in course 21A.

Credits

5

BIOE 21C Accelerated Ecology and Evolution

Accelerated introduction to ecology and evolution, emphasizing principles and processes spanning molecular, organismal, population, community, and ecosystem levels. Topics include history of Earth and life, physical and chemical environments, biogeochemical cycling, genetic and phenotypic variation, natural selection, adaptation, demography, species interactions, speciation, macroevolution, and biogeography. Biology 21C counts as the equivalent of Biology 20C for prerequisites and major requirements. Prerequisite(s): by application; passing score on biology placement examination.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOE 80N Biology of Human Health and Nutrition

An introduction to the biology of human nutrition and its effects on human health. The course explores how nutrient balance, exercise, and age interact in their effects on human health, fitness, and disease.

Credits

5

General Education Code

SI

BIOE 80P Infectious Diseases and Human Populations

An overview of the biology of infectious diseases in human societies including why diseases vary in severity, how human bodies defend themselves, and how public health efforts cope with the problem of rapidly evolving pathogens.

Credits

5

General Education Code

SI

BIOE 128 Ecology and Physiology of Large Marine Vertebrates

Lectures and laboratory computer exercises familiarize students with research methods, study design, statistics, and research tools for large marine vertebrates (seals, birds, fish, and sharks). Research topics include: animal tracking; diving physiology; behavior; foraging ecology; and energetics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Patrick Robinson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOE 20B and BIOE 20C.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOE 132 Comparative Physiology of Vertebrates

Comparative physiology of mammals, birds, and fish with emphasis on locomotor performance and exercise in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Cardiovascular, respiratory, and skeletal muscle systems examined.

Credits

5

Instructor

Terrie Williams

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C; biochemistry, cell biology, and vertebrate anatomy recommended.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOE 170 Molecular Ecology and Evolution

An introduction to evolution at the molecular level. Topics include neutral theory of evolution, natural selection, molecular clocks, molecular phylogenetics, and biogeography. (Formerly Biology 176.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Giacomo Bernardi

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C. Must be taken concurrently with BIOE 170L.

BIOE 170L Molecular Ecology and Evolution Laboratory

One laboratory section per week that applies the theory developed in course 170 to computer and laboratory experiments. Students are billed a materials fee. (Formerly Biology 176.)

Credits

2

Instructor

Giacomo Bernardi

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C. BIOE 170 must be taken concurrently.a

BIOE 198 Independent Field Study

Provides for individual programs of study (a) by means other than the usual supervision in person, or (b) when the student is doing all or most of the coursework off campus. With permission of the department, may be repeated for credit, or two or three courses taken concurrently. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

BIOE 233 Exercise Physiology

Physiological and biochemical processes associated with human performance. Students are expected to be familiar with basic organ physiology, biochemistry, and human anatomy. Focuses on bioenergetics and fuel utilization, cardiovascular and respiratory dynamics during activity, and the effects of training, age, and disease on exercise. Laboratory sessions incorporated into study sections. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 133. Prerequisite(s): by interview; BIOE 131 or 132 recommended as preparation. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. (Formerly Biology 233.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Terrie Williams

BIOL 21A Accelerated Cell and Molecular Biology

Accelerated introduction to biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics, with an emphasis on class discussion and problem solving. Students must have a solid foundation in general chemistry and high school biology. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 20A. This course is equivalent to course 20A for prerequisites and major requirements. Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 1B. Students must apply for admission to this course. Admittance based on scores on the biology and chemistry placement exam and performance in Chemistry 1B. AP biology and chemistry credit will also be taken into account.

Credits

5

Instructor

Martha Zuniga

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOL 21L Environmental Phage Genomics Laboratory

Introduction to hypothesis-driven laboratory research. Students isolate and characterize both the structure and genome of a unique bacteriophage. Students gain experience in basic sterile technique, solution, manipulation of DNA, and bioinformatic analysis of a new genome. Enrollment restricted to first-year students and sophomores. Enrollment by online application and permission of instructor.

Credits

3

Instructor

Manuel Ares, Grant Hartzog

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 89 Clinical Health Care: Organization and Financing

Introduces students to the principles of health care organizations, including how they are paid for, and examines social constructions of health care in the U.S. Key concepts include access, quality of care, and cultural competence; also features hands-on research. Recommended for health science majors and community studies majors focusing on health. Cannot receive credit for this course and course 89W.

Credits

5

Instructor

Andrea Steiner

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

BIOL 89W Clinical Health Care: Organization and Financing

Introduces students to the principles of health care organizations, including how they are paid for, and examines social constructions of health care in the U.S. Key concepts include access, quality of care, and cultural competence; also features hands-on research. Recommended for health science majors and community studies majors focusing on health. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 89. Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; enrollment by permission of instructor at first class meeting.

Credits

5

Instructor

Andrea Steiner

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

BIOL 110L Cell Biology Laboratory

Fundamental aspects of cell biology explored through experimentation in a modern laboratory setting. Research topics include the structure and function of biological membranes; intracellular transport and organelle biogenesis; the cell cycle; and the cytoskeleton. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 100 or BIOC 100A, and BIOL 100K or BIOL 20L or BIOL 101L, and previous or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 110. Satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to biological sciences and affiliated majors; biology minors. Non-majors enroll by instructor permission.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 111L Immunology Laboratory

Techniques of current immunology applicable to both cellular and humoral mechanisms. (Formerly course 123L.) Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Martha Zuniga

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; BIOL 111. Enrollment restricted to biological sciences and affiliated majors; biology minors; other majors by instructor permission.

Quarter offered

Spring

BIOL 113L Experimental Endocrinology Laboratory

The physiology and biochemistry of endocrine glands and their secretions. Students learn techniques such as radioimmuno and radioreceptor assays, protein hormone purification, electrophoresis, organ cultures, and endocrine gland ablation surgery and immunoprecipitation.

Credits

5

BIOL 128L Neural Genetics Laboratory

A genetics laboratory course using the nematode C. elegans as a model organism to understand the development and function of the nervous system. Comprehensive research projects are designed to teach the basic methodology and principles of genetic analysis.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A and BIOL 105. Enrollment restricted to biological sciences and affiliated majors, non-majors by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

BIOL 150L Ecology Laboratory

Field, laboratory, and computer studies emphasizing problem solving in ecology. Must be taken concurrently with course 160.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Fall

BIOL 177 Evolutionary Systematics

Overview of evolutionary systematics: morphological and molecular characteristics, species concepts, biogeographic patterns, cladistics, molecular systematics, and nomenclature. Laboratories include character acquisition, databasing, phylogenetic reconstruction and work in collections of the California Academy of Sciences. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 277. A taxon-based upper-division course is recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

BIOL 178L Protocols in Stem Cell Biology

Provides hands-on experience in embryonic stem cell culture methods and techniques. Students grow and passage mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells and perform established protocols that differentiate mES cells into cardiac muscle cells and neurons. Enrollment is restricted to biological sciences and affiliated majors; biology minors; non-majors by permission.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 100 or BIOC 100A; and BIOL 100K; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; previous or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 178. Enrollment is restricted to biological sciences and affiliated majors; biology minors; non-majors by permission.

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOL 185F Hughes Undergraduate Research Lab

Covers the application of modern research techniques to unanswered questions in human molecular genetics. Especially designed for self-motivated students interested in scientific discovery. Admission by permission of instructor.

Credits

2

Instructor

Manuel Ares

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 185L Hughes Undergraduate Research Lab

Covers the application of modern research techniques to unanswered questions in human molecular genetics. Especially designed for self-motivated students interested in scientific discovery. Admission by permission of instructor.

Credits

5

Instructor

Manuel Ares

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

BIOL 212 Virology

Virus infections of animal cells, including mechanisms of virus entry into cells, viral protein biogenesis, immune responses to viruses, pathogenesis of viral infections, latency, virus evolution, interference with virus infection, vaccine development. Intense discussion and student participation. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 112.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

BIOL 213 Topics in Endocrinology

Analysis and discussion of selected topics in endocrinology. Qualified advanced undergraduate students may enroll by permission of instructor.

Credits

5

BME 88A BMES Freshman Design Seminar

A first course in engineering design for bioengineers. In cooperation with the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES). Students choose a design project and work on it in competitive and cooperative teams. Covers research, design, prototyping, and report writing.

Credits

2

Instructor

Kevin Karplus

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to first-year Bioengineering majors and proposed majors.

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 101 Applied Electronics for Bioengineers

Introduces analog electronics. Topics include circuit theory (Kirchhoff's laws, Thevenin equivalents); constant and sinusoidal signals; RC filters; op amps; feedback; oscillators; and instrumentation amplifiers. Emphasis is on design for sensors (thermistors, microphones, electrodes, pressure sensors, phototransistors); voltage dividers are a recurring theme. (Formerly Applied Circuits for Bioengineers.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Kevin Karplus

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MATH 11B, MATH 19B, or MATH 20B; and previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 5C and PHYS 5N or PHYS 6C and PHYS 6N; concurrent enrollment in BME 101L is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

BME 101L Applied Electronics for Bioengineers Laboratory

Twice weekly, three-hour laboratory to design and build circuits to interface sensors used in bioengineering (thermistors, microphones, electrodes, pressure sensors, phototransistors). Students design and build a one-lead electrocardiograph (EKG). (Formerly Applied Circuits Laboratory.)

Credits

2

Instructor

Kevin Karplus

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in BME 101 is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

BME 102 Introduction to Medical Biotechnology

Lecture course covering biotechnology-based approaches to diagnosis and treatment of disease. Areas covered include molecular diagnostics, microarray technology and pharmacogenomics, targeted therapies, gene therapy and cell and tissue engineering. Recent advances in each field presented.

Credits

5

Instructor

Wendy Rothwell

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, or BIOL 21A, or BME 80H.

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 109 Resource-Efficient Programming

Writing programs that use computer resources efficiently. Learn to measure resource usage and modify programs to get better performance. Particularly appropriate for programmers working at limits of their hardware (bioinformaticians, game programmers, and embedded system programs).

Credits

5

Instructor

Kevin Karplus

Requirements

Prerequisites(s): CSE 15, CSE 16, and MATH 19A.

BME 200 Research and Teaching in Bioinformatics

Basic teaching techniques for teaching assistants, including responsibilities and rights of teaching assistants, resource materials, computer security, leading discussion or lab sessions, presentation techniques, maintaining class records, electronic handling of homework, and grading. Examines research and professional training, including use of library and online databases, technical typesetting, writing journal and conference papers, publishing in bioinformatics, giving talks in seminars and conferences, and ethical issues in science and engineering. Required for all teaching assistants.

Credits

3

Instructor

Joshua Stuart, Kevin Karplus, Richard Edward Green

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

BME 233 A Technological History of Antibody Genetics

Covers the genetics of antibody formation and the histories of immunology and genetics. Students read and analyze seminal papers on antibody genetics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Christopher Vollmers

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

BME 235 Banana Slug Genomics

Students will assemble and annotate the banana slug genome (Ariolimax dolichophallus) from next-generation sequencing data. Students also will explore the capabilities of the latest next-generation bioinformatics tools and write their own as needed.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Kevin Karplus

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BME 205 or graduate status. Seniors who have taken BME 110 and a computer programming course may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

BME 281K Seminar on Protein Structure Prediction

Weekly seminar series covering topics of current computational and experimental research in protein structure prediction. Current research work and literature in this area discussed. Students lead some discussions and participate in all meetings.

Credits

2

Instructor

Kevin Karplus

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring

CHEM 1P Chemistry Essentials

Introduction to basic concepts required for the Chemistry 1 series. This course is for students who have little background in high school chemistry or equivalent. Covers elementary topics including units, conversions, the mole, chemical reactions, and balancing. This course is offered during Summer Session only.

Credits

3

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

CHEM 4A General Chemistry with Quantitative Analysis

A thorough introduction to the principles and practice of chemistry. Topics include chemical reactions, gas laws, equilibrium, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, elementary kinetics and thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Aspects of the theory and practice of quantitative analysis are integrated with the lectures and accompanying laboratory (courses 4L-4M). Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; discussion: 1-1/4 hours.

Credits

5

CHEM 4B General Chemistry with Quantitative Analysis

A thorough introduction to the principles and practice of chemistry. Topics include chemical reactions, gas laws, equilibrium, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, elementary kinetics and thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Aspects of the theory and practice of quantitative analysis are integrated with the lectures and accompanying laboratory (courses 4L-4M). Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; discussion: 1-1/4 hours.

Credits

5

CHEM 4L General Chemistry with Quantitative Analysis Laboratory

Laboratory sequence that covers topics taught in Chemistry 4A-4B, respectively. Experiments include qualitative and quantitative analyses, redox titrations, spectroscopy, chromatography, electrochemistry, kinetic data acquisition and analysis. Concurrent enrollment in 4A and 4B is strongly recommended. Laboratory: 4 hours; lecture: 1 hour. Students will be billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

CHEM 4M General Chemistry with Quantitative Analysis Laboratory

Laboratory sequence that covers topics taught in Chemistry 4A-4B, respectively. Experiments include qualitative and quantitative analyses, redox titrations, spectroscopy, chromatography, electrochemistry, kinetic data acquisition and analysis. Concurrent enrollment in 4A and 4B is strongly recommended. Laboratory: 4 hours; lecture: 1 hour. Students will be billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

CHEM 80A Chemistry of Nutrition: Concepts and Controversy

Description of the relevant chemical and physical properties of the main classes of foods, vitamins, and minerals. Discussion of their digestion, sources, metabolism, recommended daily allowances, deficiencies, and how to optimize an overall healthy diet using scientific methods. Prerequisite(s): High school chemistry course recommended.

Credits

5

General Education Code

SI

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

CHEM 80D An Analytical View of Wines and Wine Chemistry

An introduction to chemical aspects of wines including winemaking and appreciation. Sensory examination and comparison of California and French wines are undertaken in part by considering chemical factors which influenced quality. Principles of laboratory analysis of different types of wines are also studied. Elements from both lecture discussion topics and laboratory experiments are used to discuss the quality of commercial wines and wine made by each student in the laboratory. It is recommended that students have completed high school chemistry or equivalent; students must be 21 years of age or older.

Credits

5

CHEM 80F Chemistry and the Environment

Presents a brief introduction to chemistry, with an emphasis on those fundamentals and processes of environmental importance. Focuses on basic chemical concepts, their application to provide a better understanding of environmental actions, and their use in formulating solutions to environmental problems. Concepts and processes (rather than quantitative and analytical perspectives) are stressed, alongside environmental problem solving using the principles presented. Offered in alternate academic years.

Credits

5

CHEM 80L Introduction to Chemistry of Wines and Musts

An integrated course exploring elementary aspects of wine evaluation and modern winemaking. Topics: effects of grape varieties, vineyard locations, production techniques, aging practices on wine quality, and winemaking. Survey of commercial wine styles and lab methods of wine component analysis provide insights on how fine wines are made and analyzed. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Philip Crews

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 80H.

CHEM 112A Organic Chemistry

An integrated study of fundamental organic chemistry, including principles, descriptive chemistry, synthetic methods, reaction mechanisms, and compounds of biological interest. These courses are coordinated with 112L-M-N respectively and are to be taken concurrently with them. Students with credit in course 108A cannot receive credit for 112A. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; optional discussion section: 1-1/4 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Claude Bernasconi

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1B, CHEM 1C, and CHEM 1N. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 112L is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 112B Organic Chemistry

An integrated study of fundamental organic chemistry, including principles, descriptive chemistry, synthetic methods, reaction mechanisms, and compounds of biological interest. These courses are coordinated with 112L-M-N respectively and are to be taken concurrently with them. Students with credit in 108B cannot receive credit for 112B. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; optional discussion section: 1-1/4 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Claude Bernasconi

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112 and CHEM 112L. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 112M is required.

Quarter offered

Winter

CHEM 112C Organic Chemistry

An integrated study of fundamental organic chemistry, including principles, descriptive chemistry, synthetic methods, reaction mechanisms, and compounds of biological interest. These courses are coordinated with 112L-M-N respectively and are to be taken concurrently with them. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; optional discussion section: 1-1/4 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Lokey

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112B and CHEM 112M. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 112N is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 112L Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory experience in organic chemistry and associated principles. Experiments involve the preparation, purification, characterization, and identification of organic compounds and make use of modern as well as classical techniques. Lecture: 1-1/2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Daniel Palleros

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1C and CHEM 1N. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 112A is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 112M Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory experience in organic chemistry and associated principles. Experiments involve the preparation, purification, characterization, and identification of organic compounds and make use of modern as well as classical techniques. Lecture: 1-1/2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Daniel Palleros

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112A and CHEM 112L. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 112B is required.

Quarter offered

Winter

CHEM 112N Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory experience in organic chemistry and associated principles. Experiments involve the preparation, purification, characterization, and identification of organic compounds and make use of modern as well as classical techniques. Lecture: 1-1/4 hours. Laboratory: 8 hours. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Daniel Palleros

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112B and CHEM 112M. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 112C is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 137 Teaching Science in the University

Readings and seminar considering why students are taking science, what science curricula are appropriate under present-day conditions, the relation of values to science, modern approaches to the teaching of knowledge and skills, modern approaches to enriching human interaction in university education. Each student serves as facilitator for a study group in course 1.

Credits

5

CHEM 138 Advanced Science Teaching

Readings and seminars on teaching science. Each student serves as facilitator for a study group in course 1, observes at meetings of the study groups, and moderates a course 137/8 seminar. Final projects or reports are required.

Credits

5

CHEM 146D Advanced Laboratory in Computational Chemistry

Designed to give experience in advanced computational chemistry through open-ended research-type problem solving. Covers molecular graphics, molecular mechanics, semi-empirical and abinitio calculations applied to conformational analysis, reaction predictions, and drug design.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 108B or CHEM 112C.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 165 Physical Chemistry Topics

Introduction to modern special topics in physical chemistry. Topics may include macromolecules, spectroscopy, and solid-state materials. Lecture-3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

CHEM 191A Beginning

Students lead one 3L or 8L laboratory section, under the direct supervision of a teaching assistant (T.A.), hold office hours, and attend the T.A. meetings for the course.

Credits

5

CHEM 191B Intermediate

Students lead one 3L or 8L laboratory section, hold office hours, and attend a T.A. meeting for the course.

Credits

5

CHEM 191C Advanced

Students lead one 3M or 8M laboratory section, hold office hours, and attend a T.A. meeting for the course.

Credits

5

CHEM 220 Biochemical Toxicology

Presents an in-depth treatment of the biochemical and physiological mechanisms underlying toxicity and detoxication. Topics include chemical-biological interactions, receptor dynamics, multicompartment kinetics, chemical activation and detoxication, induction and inhibition, and the toxic biochemical and physiological mechanisms of both natural and anthropogenic toxins.

Credits

5

CHEM 240D Computational Organic Chemistry

Current computational methods used to predict reaction products, evaluate conformational energies, and correlate NMR spectra with conformations are examined. Molecular mechanics treatments are compared to semiempirical AM1 calculations.

Credits

3

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 245 Synthetic Organic Chemistry

An advanced study of the strategy and reactions used in organic synthesis, with an emphasis on selectivity in organic transformations.

Credits

5

CHEM 246A Organic Reactions and Molecular Orbital Theory

Qualitative molecular orbital concepts, especially concerning aromaticity, orbital symmetry, and perturbation theory, and their application toward interpretation of reactivity and mechanism. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 273 and CHEM 240A.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 246B Marine Organic Chemistry

A survey of organic natural products from marine sources. Organic chemical structural families unique to marine organisms are outlined. Pathways of their synthesis and interconversions; their role in the marine environment; approaches to their analysis; the distribution of organics in seawater. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Philip Crews

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 8B and CHEM 8M.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 246C Computers and Information Processing in Chemistry

An introduction to digital computers and their applications in chemistry. Includes Monte Carlo, artificial intelligence, pattern recognition, modeling, simulation, and optimization problem-solving methods. Applications to include structural analysis, spectroscopy, organic synthesis, and kinetics. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; laboratory: 1-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 246F Organoboranes in Organic Synthesis

An introduction to organoborane chemistry and its applications to synthetic organic chemistry, including principles, synthetic methods, reaction mechanisms, and asymmetric synthesis. A variety of topics including allylboration, boron-enolates, and asymmetric reductions are discussed.

Credits

5

Instructor

Bakthan Singaram

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to seniors and graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 246G Heterocyclic Chemistry

Advanced study of synthesis and reactions of heterocyclic organic compounds; particular emphasis on structures with important medicinal value from natural products or pharmaceutical research.

Credits

5

Instructor

Joseph Konopelski

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 143 or approval of instructor.

CHEM 246H Organic Free Radical Chemistry

Covers a range of topics including radical stabilization, rates of fundamental radical reactions, methods of radical generation, synthetic applications of free radicals, persistent radicals, and some aspects of free radicals in biology.

Credits

5

Instructor

Rebecca Braslau

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 143 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 246I Advanced Mechanistic Chemistry and Solution Kinetics

Kinetic approach to selected topics in mechanistic chemistry with emphasis on structure-reactivity relationships in organic as well as inorganic and biochemical systems. Discussion of significance and treatment of kinetic data illustrated with examples from various branches of chemistry. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

Credits

5

Instructor

Claude Bernasconi

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 264 Quantum Theory of Atoms and Molecules

Application of quantum mechanical techniques to the study of the electronic structure and properties of atoms and molecules. Topics include methods used to calculate the atomic and molecular wave functions, molecular symmetry, semiclassical radiation theory, magnetic interactions, and the utilization of approximate wave functions in interpreting molecular properties. Lecture-3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

CHEM 266B Gas Phase Kinetics

A discussion of rate processes in gases. Descriptions of experimental and theoretical work on unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions and energy transfer processes. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 262.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 273 Applications of Symmetry and Quantum Mechanics

Group theory and quantum mechanics are applied to problems of the electronic structure and spectra of molecules. A variety of topics including molecular orbital theory, reactivity, electronic structure calculations, and spectroscopy are discussed. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Eugene Switkes

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 163A.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 283 Proseminar in Physical Organic Chemistry

Weekly meetings devoted to the study of physical and mechanistic organic chemistry. Topics drawn from the current literature and the research experiences of the participants.

Credits

5

Instructor

Claude Bernasconi

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 287 Proseminar in Protein Aggregation and Protein Deposition Diseases

A detailed study of various aspects of protein structure, folding, and aggregation in the context of the molecular mechanism of protein deposition diseases, with particular emphasis on Parkinson's disease and amyloidosis and the techniques involved in elucidating these mechanisms.

Credits

5

Instructor

Anthony Fink

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 289 Proseminar: Biophysical Chemistry

Weekly meetings devoted to a detailed study of the theory and applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging and related spectroscopic techniques to problems in biophysical chemistry. Topics are drawn from the current research literature and the research experiences of the participants.

Credits

5

Instructor

Thomas Schleich

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 290 Proseminar in Computational Chemistry

Weekly meetings devoted to the study of computational chemistry. Topics include molecular modeling, synthesis planning, drug design, and others from current literature and research interests of the participants.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 291A Organic Chemistry Research Seminar

Open to chemistry graduate students interested in organic chemistry. Weekly meetings are held to hear both local and external speakers discuss their work.

Credits

5

Instructor

Rebecca Braslau, Philip Crews, Roger Linington

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 291B Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Research Seminar

A weekly seminar series covering topics on the frontiers of biochemistry and molecular biology. The speakers include experts in these fields from other institutions.

Credits

5

Instructor

William Scott, Glenn Millhauser, Michael Stone

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 291C Inorganic Chemistry Research Seminar

For those interested in following the recent developments in the various areas of inorganic chemistry. External speakers; weekly discussion based on personal research or recent literature, led by the inorganic chemistry faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and students.

Credits

5

Instructor

Theodore Holman, Pradip Mascharak, Scott Oliver

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 291D Physical Chemistry Research Seminar

A weekly seminar series covering topics of current research in physical chemistry. Weekly meetings are held to hear both local and external speakers discuss their work.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ilan Benjamin, Yat Li, Jin Zhang

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CMMU 76 HIV Prevention

Presents fundamental tools of HIV prevention, outreach, and support. Provides students with information and techniques necessary to do effective community work. Topics include harm reduction, youth outreach, communication, and global community issues.

Credits

2

Instructor

Laura Engelken

Quarter offered

Spring

CMMU 80L Social Documentation

Examines works from various media recognized as being drawn from real life. Through film, photography, oral history, and other examples, develops critical understanding of social documentation as a process with implicit theories and conventions. Students create beginning documentaries in production collectives.

Credits

5

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

CMMU 118 Introduction to Grant Writing

Introduces students to non-profit organizations and grant writing. Through hands-on grant-writing experiences, students learn how to write a successful grant. Please bring a potential fundable project idea to the first class. (Formerly course 162.)

Credits

5

CMMU 122 Whiteness, Racism, and Anti-Racism

Examines the social, cultural, institutional, and personal ways that white privilege and racial domination are constructed, maintained, and reproduced in U.S. society. Goal is to reveal the hidden quality of whiteness and illuminate effective strategies for anti-racist activism. (Formerly course 114.)

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

CMMU 124 Class in the United States

Explores politics and culture of class in contemporary U.S. from interdisciplinary perspective, drawing on social theory, political economy, and cultural forms (film, music, and literature) with special emphasis on race, ethnicity, and gender. (Formerly course 104.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Dana Frank

CMMU 181 Juvenile Justice

Students are placed in a community-based program, at Juvenile Hall or with a deputy probation officer, to intern 8-10 hours each week. Includes a weekly seminar to discuss readings and presentations on the juvenile-justice system and internship experiences. Background checks and fingerprinting are required to participate in this course. A two-quarter commitment is preferred. (Formerly course 130.)

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

COWL 21 Writing Workshop: Poetry

A workshop for beginning writers of poetry. Students generate, revise, and discuss their own work as well as study modern poems that illustrate issues and choices in contemporary poetry writing.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to members of Cowell College.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

COWL 22 Writing Workshop: Prose

A workshop for novice writers of fiction in which students generate, revise, and discuss their own work as well as read stories by diverse writers.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to members of Cowell College.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

COWL 26 Drama on Page and Stage

Examines three different scripts from both a literary and performance perspective. Discusses the genre, structure, characters, and themes of each script, as well as the challenges involved in staging and the implications of various potential staging choices. Students then attend a production, evaluating the choices made in it. A fee for expenses involved in attending each production is charged.

Credits

3

COWL 32 American Photography

A review and reconsideration of some of the major American photographers, from Matthew Brady to Judy Dater, with special consideration given to Edward Steichen, Imogene Cunningham, Gertrude Kasebier, Dorothea Lange, and others. Seminar discussion and four papers required.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Spring

COWL 60 Social Justice and Diversity

Perspectives and case studies on diversity, communication, and social recognition. Discusses instances of social isms and phobias (racism, sexism, homophobia, xenophobia), and raises issues of religious tolerance and inter-faith dialogue. Includes current events and diversity topics in universitiy life. Enrollment restricted to college members. Admission by written application.

Credits

2

Instructor

Tyrus Miller

Quarter offered

Winter

COWL 80H The Literary Making of Early Modern America

Focus on the literary and cultural construction of America. Examines a variety of 16th- and 17th-century texts. Explores questions of diversity, idealism, community, and race in the early English colonies.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

COWL 119F The American Musical

Examines representative American stage musicals with emphasis on text, music, and lyrics thereof. Topics include the history of the genre and the relationship of the musicals to the political and social context of their respective times.

Credits

2

Instructor

Thomas Lehrer

Quarter offered

Winter

COWL 133 Fiction into Film

Traces the transformation from fiction into film of four modern texts. Discussions concentrate on effectiveness of the transformation in terms of filmic technique and medium differences. Final essay required.

Credits

2

COWL 134 American Silent Comedy

A look into American silent comedy, its history and aesthetics, from sources in European clowning to its difinitive moment in the 1920's films of Chaplin and Keaton to such later developments as the television style of Ernie Kovacs.

Credits

2

COWL 135 Loaded Language

A reading and discussion group focused on the interaction of language structure and socially relevant issues of language use involving questions of correctness, truth, manipulation, discrimination, and obfuscation.

Credits

2

COWL 136A La Francophonie

Studies linguistic and cultural variety in the French-speaking world. Topics range from the linguistic (language description) to the sociolinguistic (language use in multilingual societies), from literature (poetry, fiction, drama) to history and the arts.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three years high school or one year college-level French, or French 3, 4, 5, 6, 30, 111, 125, or 136A-B-C. Open to all students, but priority given to Cowell students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

COWL 136B La Francophonie

Studies linguistic and cultural variety in the French-speaking world. Topics range from the linguistic (language description) to the sociolinguistic (language use in multilingual societies), from literature (poetry, fiction, drama) to history and the arts.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three years high school or one year college-level French, or French 3, 4, 5, 6, 30, 111, 125, or 136A-B-C. Open to all students, but priority given to Cowell students.

COWL 136C La Francophonie

Studies linguistic and cultural variety in the French-speaking world. Topics range from the linguistic (language description) to the sociolinguistic (language use in multilingual societies), from literature (poetry, fiction, drama) to history and the arts.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Three years high school or one year college-level French, or French 3, 4, 5, 6, 30, 111, 125, or 136A-B-C. Open to all students, but priority given to Cowell students.

COWL 137 Modern Classical Acting

An investigation into the idea of modern classical acting through seminar discussion and studio performance. Students practice detailed textual analysis of classical texts (with particular emphasis on Shakespeare) and their memorization and performance. Designed for members of Cowell College.

Credits

3

COWL 150 Placing Nature

Development of an interpretive natural history trail on the lower and middle UCSC campus. Directed reading in pertinent literature and intensive practice in writing or graphically illustrating short popular pieces on natural history, as well as preparation of the guide-leaflet itself.

Credits

2

COWL 181 American Campus Planning

Study of campus planning in American colleges and universities from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, with comparison to the planning and ideals of UCSC.

Credits

3

CRWN 10 Becoming a Successful Student

An interactive course providing students with the opportunity to assess and revise methods of and purpose in studying. Critical, effective approaches to reading, writing, participating in lectures and sections, taking exams, balancing competing responsibilities, and utilizing campus resources are all explored. Permission of college adviser required.

Credits

2

Instructor

F Ferguson

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring

CRWN 22 Topics in Oceanography: Environment, Technology, Global Interactions

Weekly discussions of current events in a scientific context. Drawing from news publications, lectures, and seminars, focus is on topics such as marine pollution, environmental degradation, technological advances, catastrophic weather events, climate change. Presentations to be accompanied by group discussion. Evaluation based on discussion participation and short papers critiquing published articles on course topics. Course is designed for students who have successfully completed high school level biology and chemistry.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

CRWN 23 Poverty and Discrimination in America

The reality of poverty and discrimination in the 1990's; the nature and extent of these conditions; and the serious and contentious political debate about their solution. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Economics 80C.

Credits

3

Quarter offered

Fall

CRWN 29 Women in Science: Biographies

Examination of issues concerning women in science, using biographical and authobiographical accounts of women scientists. Topics include the contemporary and historical representation of women in science at various career levels and exploration of the challenges, rewards, and strategies of women scientists.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

CRWN 80H Ethical Issues in Emerging Technologies: Transgenics, Clones, Cyborgs, and A.I. (Honors)

Explores emerging issues in science and technology: bioengineering, information systems, artificial intelligence, and animal rights. Examines ethical challenges faced as the world is regularly and cataclysmically transformed by the sciences. Requires more advanced readings than course 80. Interview only. Enrollment restricted to first-year college members.

Credits

5

Instructor

F Ferguson

Quarter offered

Fall

CRWN 80K Science, Technology, and Human Biology on Exhibition

Presents innovative museum exhibitions and artists whose work is geared toward educating the public about science, technology, and human biology. Field trips may include The Tech Museum of Innovation and The Exploratorium.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tiffany Wong

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the C1 requirement; enrollment restricted to college members or by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter

CRWN 84H Extreme Environment Virology

Students sample viruses from an extreme environment during a field trip, and sequence DNA from that sample and other viruses and assemble their genomes. This is an integrated course in molecular genetics and bioinformatics focusing on extreme environments.

Credits

5

Instructor

David Bernick

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to Crown and Cowell Honors students.

General Education Code

SI

Quarter offered

Winter

CRWN 170A Leadership and Teamwork in the Workplace A

Supports students in reflecting on and enhancing experiential learning in a profession training program (PTP) internship matching their career goals. Subjects include techniques for maximizing the internship experience with a focus on preparing for leadership in the workplace. Enrollment by interview only.

Credits

2

Instructor

Barbara Silverthorne

Quarter offered

Winter

CRWN 170B Leadership and Teamwork in the Workplace B

Supports students in reflecting on and enhancing experiential learning in a profession training program (PTP) internship matching their career goals. Subjects include techniques for maximizing the internship experience with a focus on preparing for leadership in the workplace. Prerequisite(s): course 170A and permission of instructor.

Credits

2

Instructor

Barbara Silverthorne

Quarter offered

Spring

CSE 60M Scientific Computation with Matlab and Maple

Basic concepts from calculus visualized using Matlab and Maple; plotting data and functions, integration, differentiation, limits; solving systems of equation; linear regression; and example applications from science and engineering. (Formerly Computer Science 60M.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Manfred Warmuth

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MATH 19B, or MATH 20B, or by consent of instructor.

CSE 290Y Quantum Computing

Quantum information theory and theory of quantum computation. Quantum circuits. Algorithms for database search, integer factorization, and order finding. Quantum coding and error correction. Quantum teleportation. Shannon and von Neumann entropies. Quantum communication and cryptography. See instructor to discuss course requirements before enrolling. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. Seniors may enroll with the consent of the instructor. (Formerly Computer Science 290Y.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Joel Yellin

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

DANM 100A Animation I

Hands-on course introduces students to basic methods and practices in animation while exposing them to independent animation artists. Students explore techniques ranging from hand-drawn, frame-by-frame animation to object animation and pixilation. (Formerly course 131, Introduction to Animation.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to sophomore, junior, and senior majors and graduate students in digital arts new media, art, computer science game design, film and digital media, and theater; or by permission of instructor.

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

DANM 100B Animation II

Expands on student understanding of both experimental and conventional animation techniques. Workshops in 2D drawn, stop-motion, and stop-action animation methods are combined with tutorials of the post-production process, screenings of animation examples, and critique.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): DANM 100A or DANM 131, or ART 107, or CMPM 25 or CMPM 26, or by permission of instructor. Enrollment restricted to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Spring

DANM 218 Interactive Game Design

As a team, students design a working prototype of a game including the Design Document, Prototypes, and Game Implementation. Introduced to advanced media types including 3D animation, principles of object-oriented programming, digital music, and video. Strongly recommended that students have a working knowledge of programming language, preferably an object-oriented language (Macromedia Lingo preferred).

Credits

5

Instructor

Barry Sinervo

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Upper-division undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

DANM 225 Theater, Drama, and the Pixar Feature

Viewing of the Pixar Animation Studios canon combined with lectures on the major art history movements within discipline of theater history and its attendant dramatic literature: The Marxist Epic: A Bug's Life and the Backstage Musical; Shakespeare's Comedic Weltanschauung: Finding Nemo; Postmodern Criticism: Toy Story; French Romanticism and the Hugo Hero: Monsters, Inc.; Alger, Albee, and The Incredibles' American Dream.

Credits

5

Instructor

Daniel Scheie

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Upper-division undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

DANM 226 Creativity, Collaboration, and Professionalism in Art

Exploration of the practice of making a living, as well as a life, in art. Examines strategies for connecting with the community using outreach projects and the joys and sorrows of working collaboratively. Compares corporate and nonprofit funding paths and the business of showing work while maintaining creative challenges.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tandy Beal

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Upper-division undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

DANM 249 Faculty Seminar

Faculty lectures to familiarize first-year DANM graduate students with program faculty members and their creative work and research so the students can select their faculty advisers and thesis committee members.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

EART 4 Earth's Environment and the Cinema

Exploration of cinema's role in defining societal awareness of Earth sciences (underlying concepts and factual basis) for disaster and adventure movies and in more subtle presentations. Topics include evolution of life, surface environment and the planet's deep interior, natural hazards, global warming, and meteorite impacts. (Formerly course 80D, Earth Sciences and the Cinema.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Thorne Lay

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Spring

EART 6 Concepts in Environmentalism

Learn scientific concepts required to be an informed environmentalist. Topics include urban smog; water resources and pollution; waste treatment; acid rain; global climate change; fossil fuel, nuclear, and renewable energy; overpopulation; and how an individual can minimize his or her environmental impact.

Credits

5

Instructor

Patrick Chuang

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

EART 9 Earth History and Global Change

Over the past 4.5 billion years, planet Earth has evolved in exciting ways. Environments, climates, and life forms have come and gone in fascinating combinations. Course examines changing physical, biological, and climatological conditions through geologic time, beginning with the evolution of the Earth through changes leading to the current state of the planet, and considers prospects for Earth's future.

Credits

5

General Education Code

PE-E

EART 113 Physics in the Earth Sciences

Physics applied to geological problems, including basic mechanics, stress and strain, heat transport, and fluid flow. Discussion-2 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Coe

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): EART 111 or MATH 22 or MATH 23A; and PHYS 5B or PHYS 6B.

Quarter offered

Spring

EART 114 Environmental Geophysics

Explores the shallow subsurface environment, including groundwater systems, buried faults, sedimentary basins and other environmentally significant features using the tools of geophysics. Data acquisition and interpretation focus on understanding processes and defining problems.

Credits

5

EART 115 Applied Geophysics

Introduction to field and laboratory techniques in geophysics and their application to geologic and environmental problems. Includes introduction to seismic reflection and refraction, gravity, magnetic, and electrical resistivity methods. Laboratory-6 hours.

Credits

5

EART 117 Paleomagnetism

How the fossil magnetism of rocks is used to decipher Earth's history: applications to tectonics, geochronology, stratigraphy, structural geology, geomagnetism, and archeology. Includes an overnight field trip to collect samples for a class research project.

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Coe

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): EART 5, EART 10 or EART 20; and PHYS 5C or PHYS 6C or equivalent per instructor permission; concurrent enrollment in EART 117L is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

EART 117L Paleomagnetism Laboratory

A hands-on research project in the Paleomagnetic Laboratory. Students collectively drill oriented cores in the field (one–two days), prepare and measure the samples, and analyze and interpret the data. Each student writes an individual final report based on the class results.

Credits

2

Instructor

Robert Coe

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): concurrent enrollment in EART 117 is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

EART 122 Paleoceanography

Reconstruction of the chemistry, biology, circulation, and temperature of the ocean and of climate systems throughout geologic time. Emphasis on interpretation of the marine sedimentary record and geochemical cycling. Discussion-1 hour. Will be offered in the 2006–07 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Margaret Delaney

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): EART 102 or EART 110A, or OCEA 101 (may be taken concurrently) or EART 102.

EART 123 Marine Stratigraphy

Introduction to the fundamental concepts and methods of modern marine stratigraphy. Topics covered include lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, chemostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, seismic stratigraphy, cyclestratigraphy, graphic correlation, and spectral analysis. Practical application of techniques is explored within the context of Cenozoic paleoceanography. One Saturday field exercise. Will be offered in the 2001-02 academic year.

Credits

5

EART 132 Advanced Mineralogy

Introduction to the physics and chemistry of bonding in minerals and silicate melts. Relationship of mineral and melt structures to physical properties. Application of modern analytical techniques to studying the structures, chemistry, and physical properties of Earth materials.

Credits

5

EART 147 Field Methods in Hydrology

Covers field methods used in water resources management and groundwater contamination studies, including well pumping tests, unsaturated zone monitoring, and ground-water sampling techniques.

Credits

5

EART 167 Formation of the Solar System

The formation of asteroids, comets, moons, planets, and the samples that derive from them, with a focus on meteorites, astronomical discoveries, spacecraft mission results, and modeling. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 267.

Credits

5

Instructor

Erik Asphaug

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MATH 11B or MATH 19B or EART 111; and PHYS 5A or PHYS 6A; and EART 160.

Quarter offered

Winter

EART 168 Reflection Seismology

Introduction to reflection seismology, presenting an overview of data acquisition, processing, and interpretation; common depth point method; velocity determinations; filtering; migration; display. Applications to seismic stratigraphy and structure of the crust and of continental margins. Laboratory: 3 hours.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): EART 111; or MATH 11A and MATH 11B; or MATH 19A and MATH 19B; or AM 15A and AM 15B.

EART 170 Global Seismology

Introduction to quantitative earthquake and global Earth structure seismology. Topics include basic elasticity, wave characteristics, seismic ray theory, wave reflection, surface waves, normal modes, seismic instrumentation, application of seismic waves to reveal Earth structure and resulting models, representation of earthquake sources such as explosions and faulting, earthquake rupture scaling, modern methods of modeling seismic recordings to study source complexity, and an introduction to seismotectonics. Laboratory-3 hours. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 270.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

EART 190A Senior Seminar

Seminar concerning a major scientific debate in the earth sciences and designed to integrate the undergraduate major. Topics vary quarterly and require synthesis of geological, geophysical, and geochemical information mostly drawn from the current research literature.

Credits

5

EART 196A Introductory Teaching Seminar

Training for undergraduates in practical teaching skills. Focus on preparation, assessment, and feedback. Classroom techniques, organizational and time management strategies, practice teaching sessions. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 203. Future participation in 196B is encouraged. Course may not be counted toward upper-division major requirements.

Credits

2

Instructor

Emily Brodsky

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to Earth sciences, Earth sciences/anthropology, and environmental studies/Earth sciences majors.

Quarter offered

Fall

EART 205 Introductory Graduate Seminar

Lecture and- seminar-style class intended to welcome new graduate students to the department and to introduce students to the research and interests of departmental faculty and researchers. Includes exercises to develop skills in reading scientific abstracts and papers and in writing abstracts and proposals. Two weekend field trips.

Credits

2

Instructor

Susan Schwartz

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to Earth sciences graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

EART 209 Solid Earth Geochemistry

Origin and distribution of the elements in the earth and meteorites; bulk and isotopic composition and differentiation of terrestrial planets, core, mantle, and crust; Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf-U isotopic tracers. Course designed for graduate students, but available to qualified earth sciences majors per instructor permission.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

EART 210 Overview of Stellar and Planetary Formation and Evolution

Overview of current understanding of star and planet formation and evolution. Examines our solar system in the context of the galactic planetary census. Provides a uniform introduction to astronomy and Earth science planetary students.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

EART 231 Igneous Petrology

Systematic study of the major igneous rock suites, combining petrography, experimental petrology, major and trace elements, volatiles, and isotopic characteristics. Laboratory: three hours. Course designed for graduate students but available to qualified earth sciences majors. Course 130 is recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

EART 245 Advanced Geomorphology

Rigorous presentation of major subsets of geomorphology: I. Mechanics of sediment transport. Physics of sediment transport in both air and water. II. Mechanics of hillslope processes. III. Glaciology and glacial geology. Topics vary from year to year between these three. Will be offered in the 2005–06 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Anderson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): EART 140 and EART 113 or EART 110C. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified Earth sciences majors may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

EART 248 Sedimentology Field Studies

Alternates between lectures, seminars, discussions, and field trips to dune fields, beaches, and other coastal, marine, and fluvial environments. Class time focuses on selected processes and structures in sedimentology; field trips emphasize observational techniques.

Credits

3

Instructor

David Rubin

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

EART 250 Marine Micropaleontology

Introduces students to the biology, paleontology, and biostratigraphy of marine microfossils. Included are planktonic and benthic foraminifera, calcareous nannoplankton, diatoms, radiolaria and ostracodes. Focus is on microscope identification of Cenozoic microfossils in a weekly laboratory.

Credits

5

EART 251 Photogrammetry

Introduces photogrammetry 's basic principles of imaging systems and digital-image processing for both terrestrial and planetary data, leading to the application of photogrammetry techniques to a final project of the student's choosing.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students or by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

EART 256 Paleoclimate Modeling: Methods and Applications

Addresses methods of paleoclimate modeling on global and regional scales, from both surface and atmospheric perspectives. Applications of models to current significant paleoclimate problems will be examined. Includes both lecture and seminar formats.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates by permission of instructor only.

EART 261 Astrobiology

Study of the evolution and diversification of life on this planet; and factors affecting habitability of other bodies in this solar system and elsewhere.

Credits

5

Instructor

Paul Koch, Walter Nimmo

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students in Earth sciences, physics, biology, or chemistry.

EART 263L Planetary Field Course

Field class in comparative planetology. Three- to four -day field trip plus planning and debriefing sessions.

Credits

2

Instructor

Erik Asphaug

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

EART 267 Formation of the Solar System

The formation of asteroids, comets, moons, planets, and the samples that derive from them, with a focus of meteorites, astronomical discoveries, spacecraft mission results, and modeling. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 167.

Credits

5

Instructor

Erik Asphaug

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

EART 269 Advanced Marine Stratigraphy: Techniques and Applications

Explores concepts and methods of correlating marine sedimentary sequences. Emphasis on the integration of techniques and development of the Cenozoic stratigraphic record. One 2-hour laboratory each week. Upper-division students who have completed course 120 may enroll in this course.

Credits

5

Instructor

James Zachos

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

EART 276 Geology of the Peopling of the Americas

Using a multidisciplinary approach, examines physical geology, paleoenvironment, human biology, linguistics, and culture history of Americas at end of last Ice Age. Particular emphasis on reconstructing timing, routes, and context of first peopling of the American continents. Taught in conjunction with Anthropology 276D. Students cannot receive credit for both courses.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Paul Koch

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

EART 278B Advanced Seismology

Special topics in wave propagation in heterogeneous, three-dimensional media, applications for determination of Earth's structure, kinematics and dynamics of the seismic source, near field phenomena, engineering applications, current problems.

Credits

5

Requirements

Course is designed for graduate students but available to qualified Earth sciences majors. PHYS 110B and PHYS 116B are recommended as preparation. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

EART 278C Advanced Seismology

Special topics of interest in current research by the seismology group. Discussion of new developments in earthquake mechanics, wave propagation, tectonics, earthquake prediction.

Credits

5

Requirements

Course is designed for graduate students but available to qualified Earth sciences majors. PHYS 110B and PHYS 116B are recommended as preparation. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

EART 279 Interpretive Data Processing

Rigorous statistical treatment of geophysical data involving: Bayesian inference; stochastic processes and fields; information theory; non-linear and non-assumptive error analysis; cluster analysis; regional variables; correlograms and kriging. Develops the theoretical framework of linear geostatistics and geophysical inverse theory. Designed for graduate students but available to qualified Earth sciences majors.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

EART 280C Contaminants and Ecosystems: Topics

A graduate discussion course considering geochemical, biological, and ecological aspects of contaminants and ecosystems. The interdisciplinary nature of the this subject is emphasized through critical readings and discussion. Each student explores a topic in detail by preparing a written review and leading a class discussion.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

EART 290J Topics in Geomorphology and Quaternary History

Selected topics in Earth surface processes and Quaternary history are treated in detail. Emphasis is placed on recent advances, both in theory and in field and dating techniques. Course designed for graduate students but available to qualified Earth sciences majors. Will be offered in the 2005-06 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Anderson

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ECON 80C Poverty, Wealth, and Inequality: National and International Perspectives

Concept(s) of poverty, measures of wealth and income distribution. Economic sources of such inequality and poverty. Impact of discrimination. Role of government policy in both exacerbating and reducing inequality. Studies of and comparisons with other contemporary societies, e.g., India and Mexico.

Credits

5

ECON 80E Setting National Priorities: A Policy Agenda for the 1990s

Provides a setting for an informed discussion of important public policy issues, including health care reform, educational reform, federal and state budgets, environmental regulation, international trade and U.S. competitiveness, welfare reform. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 152.

Credits

5

ECON 80F Immigration

The economic and social causes and consequences of immigration into the United States. Both historical and current immigration are considered. Emphasis placed on California's experience, on national and state policy, and on the ethics of immigration policy.

Credits

5

ECON 102 Forecasting

Theory and analysis of long-run and short-run forecasts of economic activity. Emphasis is on empirical applications. Applications of forecasting techniques in organizational settings.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ECON 100B or ECON 100N; and ECON 113.

Quarter offered

Winter

ECON 103 Topics in Microeconomic Theory

A seminar in advanced microeconomics focusing on a selection of theoretical issues. Emphasis is on detailed modeling and analysis of microeconomic behavior.

Credits

5

ECON 106 Evolutionary Thought in the Social Sciences

Emphasizes class discussion and term papers for social science, philosophy, and biology majors. Covers the development and recent trends of evolutionary thought in biology and social sciences including social Darwinism, sociobiology, evolutionary psychology, and evolutionary game theory.

Credits

5

Instructor

Daniel Friedman

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements.

Quarter offered

Spring

ECON 107 Economic Justice

Theories of justice, equity, and rights in economics and their applications to such issues as wages, taxation, property rights, welfare programs, and globalization. Students get extensive practice in writing persuasive, argumentative essays.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ECON 1 and ECON 2, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements.

Quarter offered

Fall

ECON 109 Business Ethics

Critical examination of ethical principals, theories, and their application to business, nonprofit, and public organizations; exploration of the process of ethical decision making and ethical problems facing managers, including corporate social responsibility, work place democracy, consumer safety, environmental protection and international business conduct.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ECON 1 and ECON 2; satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements.

Quarter offered

Summer

ECON 118 Fraud Examination

Covers the principles and methodology of fraud detection and deterrence. Includes topics such as skimming, cash larceny, check tampering, register disbursement schemes, billing schemes, payroll and expense reimbursement schemes, non-cash misappropriations, corruption, accounting principles and fraud, fraudulent financial statements, and interviewing witnesses.

Credits

5

Instructor

Donald Gusarson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ECON 10B.

ECON 122 Agricultural Development

Study of economics of agricultural change in less developed countries. Problems, promises of food production and distribution; ecological, social, economic, political constraints to increased agricultural production; price policies, land tenure systems; technological change; employment problems; international aspects of agricultural development. Course 120 is strongly recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

ECON 127A Asian Americans in the U.S. Economy

Examination of the economic status of Asian-Americans in the U.S. focusing on the strategies of adaptation found by different groups with particular emphasis on the role of ethnic enterprises.

Credits

5

ECON 129 Political Economy of Policy Reform

Analyzes the adoption, timing, sequencing, relative economic performance of different market-friendly economic reform strategies. Explores issues of shock therapy versus gradualism, connections between form of regime (democracy or dictatorship) and economic reform packages, and strengths and limitations of a rational-choice theoretic approach to explaining outcomes.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

LGST 129

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ECON 100A.

ECON 134 Environmental Business

Focuses on marketing and society and the environmental problems which affect marketing managers and corporate strategy. Evaluates the relationships between the environment and the business world, and explores the political and economic concepts that underlie environmental thinking.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ECON 1.

ECON 136L Laboratory Business Strategy

Laboratory sequence discussing business simulation game associated with course 136. One three-hour session in microcomputer lab.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): concurrent enrollment in ECON 136.

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

ECON 144 The Modern European Economy

A comparative study of major European economies since 1945. Focuses on the alternative means with which European countries have pursued social and economic objectives. The approach is analytical and requires a thorough background in micro- and macroeconomics.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ECON 1 and ECON 2; ECON 100A and ECON 100B are strongly recommended.

ECON 145 Comparative Economic Systems

Study of centrally planned systems and their problems of transition to market mechanisms. Focus on issues of resource mechanisms, income distribution, and the role of ideology in economic decisions.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ECON 1, ECON 2, and ECON 100A.

ECON 146 The Political Economy of China

Evolution of the economic system of China since 1949. Focus on problems of transition to a market-based economy, the sharp contrasts between Maoist and non-Maoist approaches to economic development, and the persistence of Maoist economic features.

Credits

5

ECON 147 The Political Economy of Japan

Deals with various aspects of the contemporary Japanese economy. The first part of the course focuses on the domestic structure, with emphasis on the internal structure of the Japanese firms. The second part focuses on trade issues of Japan.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ECON 100A and ECON 100B.

ECON 154 The Political Economy of Military Spending in the Cold War Era

The growth, size, and composition of post WW II military expenditures are analyzed in terms of alternate theories-mainstream, Marxist, bureaucracy, and private interest group-followed by analysis of the economic effects and effectiveness of military expenditures in the U.S.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ECON 1 and ECON 2.

ECON 155 Urban Economics

Rigorous micro and welfare economic analysis of urban problems, both positive and normative. Problems include housing, transportation, location of firms, land use, city size, and environmental quality.

Credits

5

ECON 163 Forensic Economics

Involves the programmatic application of microeconomics, macroeconomics, international trade and finance, and monetary theory to give an economic and strategic analysis of the issues and preparation of actual legal trials and hearings using economic evidence.

Credits

5

ECON 181 Economics of Real Estate

The economics of real estate, including development, financing, construction and land costs, zoning, land use, externalities, and planning. Also considers speculation and real estate appreciation.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ECON 100A or ECON 100M; and ECON 100B or ECON 100N.

ECON 203 Applications in Macroeconomics

Applies concepts and tools developed in course 202 to practical problems and policy-related issues. Emphasis is on empirical applications and student projects. Topics covered include the relationships between budget deficits and interest rates, money and prices, and tax policy and personal savings. Course 202 is strongly recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

ECON 222 Public Sector Economies in Developing Countries

Role of government in mobilizing foreign and domestic resources for development; tax structures and levels in developing countries and relationship to growth targets; evaluation of government development projects.

Credits

5

ECON 230A Topics in International Financial Markets

Theory, evidence, and case studies of exchange rate formation and change and of private international portfolio management. Course 241 is strongly recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

ECON 230B Topics in International Financial Markets

Theory, evidence, and case studies of exchange rate formation and change and of private international portfolio management. Course 241 is strongly recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

ECON 240C Advanced International Trade Theory III

Covers the empirical aspects of international trade issues. Topics include the testing and estimation of various trade models such as the Ricardian model, Heckscher-Ohlin-Vanek model, intra-industry trade models, trade models associated with multinational corporations, models of trade and intellectual property rights, the impact of trade on income inequality, and trade between developed and developing economies.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ECON 240B. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

ECON 245 Transitional Economies

The economic structure and functioning of Soviet-type economies (including the former U.S.S.R. and the People's Republic of China) and their problems of transition to market economies. Planning systems, investment policies, fiscal policies, and policies toward foreign trade and investment receive particular attention. Courses 204A and 205A are strongly recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

ECON 246 Economics of Latin America

Economic growth and development in Latin America since the 1930's. Discusses the political economy of trade, industrial, fiscal, and monetary policy-making during these decades. Issues include income distribution, external debt, stabilization, and recent economic reform and liberalization policies. Courses 204A and 205A are strongly recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

ECON 247A Economies of East Asia

Focuses on the economic growth and policy of Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and other Asian economies. Topics include fiscal, monetary, and trade policies, labor-management and management-government relations and institutions, and human resource development. Explores reasons for rapid growth rates of these nations and their relations with the United States. Course 204A is strongly recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

ECON 248A Economics of the Middle East and North Africa

Topics in the economic transformation of the Middle East and North Africa. Studies the impact of oil wealth on growth and development of the region since 1960; stresses issues related to the successful management of oil revenues.

Credits

5

ECON 248B Economies of Sub-Saharan Africa

The economic structure and policies of the poorest continent. Focus is on agricultural development possibilities and difficulties; the international environment, including terms of trade and foreign lending flows; and domestic government policies. Courses 204A and 205A are strongly recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

ECON 251 Economics of Regulation

An analysis of the role of government regulation in the American economy and in its principal trading partners. Includes an examination of positive and normative theories of regulation and development of criteria for assessing the efficiency and welfare effects of regulation. Also examines the methods and consequences of regulation in selected traded-goods industries.

Credits

5

ECON 252 International Aspects of Public Finance

Comparative analysis of fiscal systems; effects of fiscal relationships on world trade, capital flows and development; fiscal coordination for common markets, free trade areas, and federations among developed and developing countries.

Credits

5

ECON 253 Economics of Legal Systems

The application of economic theory to issues in the law. The role of transaction costs, insurance, and the optimal allocation of resources in determining the rules of law. Topics include corporate law, alimony, criminal, contract, and tort law.

Credits

5

ECON 269C Advanced Accounting Theory and Practice

Focuses on the uses of accounting to measure economic activity and allocate resources. Emphasizes the uses of accounting data for external reporting and internal uses for management decision making. Topics include: present value concepts, financial statement analysis and profit reporting. Course 200 is strongly recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

ECON 271 Advanced Topics in Macroeconomic Theory

Advanced topics and current research in macroeconomic theory, including DSGE models, empirical issues, and optimal policy analysis. Prerequisite(s): courses 204A-B-C, 205A-B-C, and 211A-B-C are strongly recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

ECON 285 International and Political Economic Currents

Meets once a week for one hour to discuss international political and economic events. Students read The Economist, The Wall Street Journal, and pertinent foreign language newspapers and magazines. This reading forms the basis of the weekly discussions. Gives students an opportunity to strengthen their language skills and to apply concepts from their core courses.

Credits

2

EDUC 40 Identity and Schooling

Examines history and philosophy of U.S. public education system and its impact on identity formation. Introduces basic frameworks for understanding school and society.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ronald Glass

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to first-year, incoming Bridge/EOP students.

Quarter offered

Fall

EDUC 92A The Evolution of Education

Introduction to educational theory, Plato through Freire. A survey of major ideas and issues in education, ranging from the purposes of education and the organization of knowledge to the nature of teaching, compulsion in schooling, and questions concerning developmental theory, moral education, and aesthetic education. Course enrollment is unrestricted.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

EDUC 92B Introduction to Theories of Education

A general survey of theories and partial theories of education organized into three recurrent topics: teaching and learning, schooling, and education in society. Each is considered in terms of the partial theories of James, Dewey, and Skinner; cognitive constructivism, particularly the theories of cognitive science; and, finally, an integrated sociocultural theory of education.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

EDUC 92C Introduction to Issues in Diversity and Education

Examines the impact on schools and students of social/ethnic status, social class, and gender, with attention to historical, cultural, and psychological variables. An introduction to the theory, research, and reform movements in education in response to our state's and our nation's increasing diversity.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

EDUC 113 Educational and Documentary Video

Combines a theoretical and practical approach to educational and documentary video and film. Through lectures, viewings, and discussions analyzes documentary theories, structures, and criticism. Students develop video production techniques and produce educational documentaries.

Credits

5

EDUC 131 Issues in Bilingual-Multicultural Education

This seminar focuses upon the main currents in bilingual-multicultural education in the United States, beginning with a review of the history of bilingual education programs in the United States and the local service area and emphasizing philosophy and program experience. Specifically examines the following as they relate to bilingual-multicultural education: assimilation, acculturation, cultural pluralism, ESL/SSL, the relationship between language and culture, parent participation in developing policy and programs, language shift vs. language maintenance programs, biculturalism, bilingualism, racism, legislation.

Credits

5

EDUC 136 Third World Women: Family, Work, and Empowerment

Examines contemporary lives of women in poorer countries of Asia, Africa, and Latin America, focusing on different family structures, the concept of work and women's role as invisible laborers, and organizing efforts of women to transform their lives. Meets clear credential theory requirement or curriculum requirement.

Credits

5

EDUC 145 Classroom Tutorial

Students learn about the schooling process through a field placement of ten to twelve hours per week in local classrooms. Weekly seminars focus on teaching techniques and aspects of classroom management such as keeping students on task and positive reinforcement strategies.

Credits

5

EDUC 155 Minorities in Higher Education

Historical review and contemporary examination of the educational experience of U.S. minorities in higher education. Includes historical overview of the treatment of minority groups within higher education with special attention to Native Americans, Chicanos, Latinos, African Americans, and Asian Americans.

Credits

5

Instructor

Francisco Hernandez

EDUC 164L Urban Education Fieldwork

Fieldwork in diverse schools and/or communities which involves interviews and/or tutoring and research. Must be taken concurrently with course 164, Urban Education.

Credits

2

Instructor

June Gordon

Quarter offered

Fall

EDUC 170L Schools and Asian Cultures Fieldwork

Fieldwork in diverse schools and/or communities which involves interview and/or tutoring and research. Must be taken concurrently with course 170, Schooling and Asian Cultures.

Credits

2

Instructor

June Gordon

Quarter offered

Winter

EDUC 175 Language, Culture, and the Classroom

Offers students an opportunity to think about the ways that language and culture intersect with classroom learning. Includes the linguistic and cultural diversity of students and teacher alike. Implications for practice, research, and policy will be discussed.

Credits

5

Instructor

Julianne Scott

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Quarter offered

Spring

EDUC 176 Learning to Talk and Talking to Learn

Learning to talk and talking to learn are closely related. They are also the chief medium of education. Through practical work combined with reading and discussion, investigates ways in which adults can help children/students to learn.

Credits

5

Instructor

C. Wells

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

EDUC 193 Advanced Field Study

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

EDUC 209 Introduction to Technology in Schools

This course is required for prospective teachers. It provides an overview of the use of technology in the K–12 classroom. Topics covered include using the Internet and the web, building a web page, and using resources for educators on the web. Students will review software applications in a particular content area, use technology to develop lesson plans, and create integrated, thematic curricula in which technology is utilized to promote higher-order thinking, creativity, and problem-solving.

Credits

2

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to MA/credential students.

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

EDUC 223 Writing Across the Curriculum in Middle and Secondary Classrooms

Reviews issues of literacy and writing in secondary content areas. Students write in several genre and prepare lesson plans for teaching writing within the discourse of their respective curricular area.

Credits

2

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 225 is required; enrollment restricted to MA/credential students.

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

EDUC 224 Learning and Teaching Writing in Elementary Classrooms

Explores the practical application of teaching and learning writing in elementary school classrooms, and considers the theoretical ideas that underpin these current practices. Guest teachers speak about their own inquiries, challenges, and successes in teaching writing.

Credits

2

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to MA/credential students.

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

EDUC 260A Math Education and Latinos

Introduction to research literature relevant to mathematics education and Latinos and topics such as Language and Mathematics Learning and Teaching Mathematics in Bilingual Classrooms. Intended for education Ph.D. students working with the Center for Mathematics Education and Latinos (CEMELA). Seminar extends over three quarters (fall, winter, spring).

Credits

2

Instructor

Judit Moschkovich

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

EDUC 260B Math Education and Latinos

Introduction to research literature relevant to mathematics and Latinos and topics such as Language and Mathematics Learning and Teaching Mathematics in Bilingual Classrooms. Intended for education Ph.D. students working with the Center for Mathematics Education and Latinos (CEMELA). Seminar extends over three quarters (fall, winter, spring).

Credits

2

Instructor

Judit Moschkovich

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

EDUC 260C Math Education and Latinos

Introduction to research literature relevant to mathematics education and Latinos and topics such as Language and Mathematics Learning and Teaching Mathematics in Bilingual Classrooms. Intended for education Ph.D. students working with the Center for Mathematics Education and Latinos (CEMELA). Seminar extends over three quarters (fall, winter, spring).

Credits

2

Instructor

Kip Tellez

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

EDUC 269A First-Year Doctoral Proseminar

This three-quarter seminar supports professional development for first-year doctoral students. Students develop essential skills for success as scholars, discuss issues in educational research and practice, and are introduced to research by Education Department faculty.

Credits

2

Instructor

George Bunch

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to education graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

EDUC 269B First-Year Doctoral Proseminar

This three-quarter seminar supports professional development for first-year doctoral students. Students develop essential skills for success as scholars, discuss issues in educational research and practice, and are introduced to research by Education Department faculty.

Credits

2

Instructor

George Bunch

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to education graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

EDUC 269C First-Year Doctoral Proseminar

This three-quarter seminar supports professional development for first-year doctoral students. Students develop essential skills for success as scholars, discuss issues in educational research and practice, and are introduced to research by Education Department faculty.

Credits

2

Instructor

George Bunch

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to education graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

EDUC 270 Graduate Seminar in Education

Advanced seminar on special educational topics. Focus will be in faculty areas of expertise; e.g., school reform, bilingualism, social class and education.

Credits

5

EDUC 270A Second-Year Professional Development Seminar

Three-quarter seminar supports professional development for second-year doctoral students. Activities include preparation of research and conference proposals, presentation of second-year project findings, and attendance at department colloquia.

Credits

2

Instructor

Judith Scott

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to second-year Ph.D. students.

Quarter offered

Fall

EDUC 270B Second-Year Professional Development Seminar

Three-quarter seminar supports professional development for second-year doctoral students. Activities include preparation of research and conference proposals, presentation of second-year project findings, and attendance at department colloquia.

Credits

2

Instructor

Judith Scott

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to second-year Ph.D. students.

Quarter offered

Winter

EDUC 270C Second-Year Professional Development Seminar

Three-quarter seminar supports professional development for second-year doctoral students. Activities include preparation of research and conference proposals, presentation of second-year project findings, and attendance at department colloquia.

Credits

2

Instructor

Judith Scott

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to second-year Ph.D. students.

Quarter offered

Spring

EDUC 275G Research Seminar in Educational Reform: Supporting Data Collection 277C

Familiarizes students with the basic concepts of educational research and facilitates progress toward completion of dissertation while identifying faculty and community resources available to assist in research.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ronald Glass

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to Ed.D. graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

EDUC 275H Research Seminar in Educational Reform: Supporting Data Collection 277D

Familiarizes students with the basic concepts of educational research and facilitates progress toward completion of dissertation while identifying faculty and community resources available to assist in research.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ronald Glass

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to Ed.D. graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

EDUC 275I Research Seminar in Educational Reform: Supporting Dissertation Writing 279A

Familiarizes students with the basic concepts of educational research and facilitates progress toward completion of dissertation while identifying faculty and community resources available to assist in research.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to Ed.D. graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

EDUC 277A Second-year Doctoral Proseminar

This three-quarter seminar supports professional development for second-year doctoral students as they prepare their qualifying materials and begin dissertation work.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 269A, EDUC 269B, and EDUC 269C. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

EDUC 277B Second-year Doctoral Proseminar

This three-quarter seminar supports professional development for second-year doctoral students as they prepare their qualifying materials and begin dissertation work.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 269A, EDUC 269B, and EDUC 269C. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

EDUC 277C Second-year Doctoral Proseminar

This three-quarter seminar supports professional development for second-year doctoral students as they prepare their qualifying materials and begin dissertation work.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 269A, EDUC 269B, and EDUC 269C. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ENVS 1 Introduction to Environmental Issues

Intended to provide a perspective on the entire range of substantive, analytic, and professional concerns represented in the environmental studies curriculum. All of the current faculty participate in the course; thus it conveys both the diversity and the integrity of the field.

Credits

5

ENVS 10 Natural Reserves Field Study

Intensive field course designed for first-year students to gain hands-on experience in our campus and Big Creek Natural Reserves. Four-day field trip accompanied by readings and discussion on ecology and conservation of central coast habitats. College Eight students are encouraged to enroll.

Credits

2

ENVS 16 Natural History of the Santa Cruz Mountains

Introduction to geography, geology, climate, hydrology, biotic communities, flora, wildlife, and scenic and recreational resources of the Santa Cruz mountains. Orientation in the field to the peaks, ridges, rivers, creeks, watersheds, vegetation, public lands, trail systems, and land uses of the range enables students to become familiar with natural history and ecology of the mountains.

Credits

5

Instructor

Frederick McPherson

Quarter offered

Summer

ENVS 20 Ecology for a Sustainable Planet

Principles of ecology are presented as they relate to the current threats to Earth's life-support systems. Ecology is seen as a way of understanding the causes and the long-term solutions for environmental problems. Designed for non-science majors.

Credits

5

ENVS 80A The Future of Rain Forests

A broad overview of both ecological and social aspects related to tropical rain forests drawing on case studies worldwide. Topics include the biology and distribution of rain forests, causes and effects of their destruction, and management options to facilitate their conservation.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Spring

ENVS 80D Filming the Environment

Addresses contemporary domestic and international environmental issues through use of feature, animated, and documentary films. Discussions focus on how environmental problems and solutions are depicted in visual media and the impacts on public opinion.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to first-year students and sophomores.

ENVS 91F Community and Agroecology

Interdisciplinary two-credit seminar designed to introduce students to concepts of community and agroecology in the context of sustainability. Course can serve as a gateway to or as a continuing basis for participation in PICA (Program in Community and Agroecology). Specific topics and readings change each quarter.

Credits

2

Instructor

The Staff

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Spring

ENVS 93 Field Study

Supervised research or organized projects for lower-division students conducted off campus within regular commuting distance of the campus. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 93F Field Study

Provides for department-sponsored individual field study for lower-division students in the vicinity of the campus under the direct supervision of a faculty sponsor. May not be counted toward major requirements. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 105 Biology and Ecology of the Vertebrates

An introduction to the fundamentals of vertebrate biology and ecology including evolutionary history, basic anatomy and physiology, systematics, ecology and major specializations for locomotion, reproduction, homeostasis, energy balance, and thermoregulation.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

BIOE 110

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ENVS 24, BIOL 20C, or BIOL150; basic biology is recommended. Concurrent enrollment in ENVS 105L is required. Enrollment restricted to environmental studies majors and combined majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

ENVS 105L Biology and Ecology of the Vertebrates Laboratory

Covers the basics of vertebrate anatomy and taxonomy with emphasis on local species identification. Lab includes a weekly film series and two Saturday trips to the California Academy of Sciences.

Credits

2

Cross Listed Courses

BIOE 110L

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ENVS 24, BIOE 20C, or BIOE 107. Concurrent enrollment in ENVS 105 is required. Enrollment restricted to environmental studies majors and combined majors.

ENVS 106C Natural History of Mammals

Evolution, ecology, and behavior of mammals, emphasizing a habitat/biome approach within the traditional study of systematics, physiology, and natural history. Focus on adaptations to selected environments and on major terrestrial communities of North America. Examples of field studies and conservation issues.

Credits

5

ENVS 106D Natural History of Amphibians and Reptiles

The evolution, anatomy, physiology, reproduction, behavior, ecology, and systematics of amphibians and reptiles. Emphasis on conservation and management. Lecture/lab/field projects. Student teams read and present topics from research literature in a partial seminar format.

Credits

5

ENVS 106L Natural History of Mammals Laboratory

Taxonomy, species identification, and functional morphology with emphasis on terrestrial species of North America. Topics include dentition, claws and nails, horns and antlers, locomotion, reproduction, sensory specializations, and field techniques. Concurrent enrollment in course 106C is required.

Credits

2

ENVS 106M Natural History of Birds Laboratory

A field course designed to complement course 106A by providing students with an opportunity to gain hands on experience in bird study. This includes participation in field exercises and weekend field trips. Concurrent enrollment in course 106A required.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ENVS 105. Concurrent enrollment in ENVS 106A required.

ENVS 127 Statistics for the Environmental Sciences

A second course in statistics for the environmental sciences. Topics cover design of experiments and observational surveys, descriptive statistics, (histogram, average, standard deviation, and normal approximation), measurement uncertainty, regression, correlation, formal probability theory, sampling, and tests of significance. An introductory statistics course and calculus through integration are required preparation. Permission to take this course will be granted to those who pass a basic skills test to be given on the first day.

Credits

5

ENVS 131L Insect Ecology Laboratory

Field and laboratory exercises are designed to test hypotheses or demonstrate principles in areas such as behavior, mutualism theory, community ecology, and agricultural ecology. Experimental design, analysis and interpretation of data are emphasized along with observational skills.

Credits

3

Instructor

Deborah Letourneau

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in ENVS 131 required.

ENVS 138L Ethnobotany Laboratory

Laboratory and field studies allow students to learn the taxonomy of important useful plant families, carry out field studies on local plant use and management practices, and investigate in detail home garden agroecosystems and model systems.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): concurrent enrollment in ENVS138 required.

Quarter offered

Spring

ENVS 142L Energy Politics and Policy Laboratory

Trains students in the concepts and skills required to make decisions about energy production.

Credits

2

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in ENVS 142 required.

Quarter offered

Spring

ENVS 148 Environmental Policy Implementation

Assessment of local, state, and federal environmental agency performance, with particular attention to regulatory development and compliance enforcement. Emphasis on successes and failures of both traditional environmental regulations and new policy approaches. Students examine various industry responses to environmental regulations, each case set in the context of overall business performance and sustainability.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in ENVS 100 and ENVS 100L, or by permission of instructor, and one of the following courses: ENVS 140, ENVS 141, ENVS149, ENVS 151, or ENVS 165.

Quarter offered

Spring

ENVS 155 Sustainable Development and Environmental Issues at the U.S.-Mexico Border

The primary objective is to enhance an understanding of environmental issues as elements of social processes. Using sustainable development as conceptual framework, identifies linkages between the empirical manifestation of environmental problems at the U.S.-Mexico border and socioeconomic issues associated with them at the local, transnational, and global levels.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to environmental studies majors and biology, Earth sciences, and economics combined majors.

ENVS 160L Restoration Ecology Laboratory

Provides hands-on experience in restoration ecology to complement lecture material in course 160. Students work on implementing, monitoring, and evaluating a number of restoration projects in the vicinity of UCSC. Concurrent enrollment in course 160 is required.

Credits

2

Instructor

Karen Holl

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ENVS 24 or BIOL 20C, and ENVS 23 and ENVS 25. Concurrent enrollment in ENVS 160 is required.

ENVS 161B Sustainable Soil Management

Soil management in agroecosystems with an emphasis on enhancing and maintaining soil quality. Emphasis placed on influence of soil properties on crop development and productivity. Topics include conservation, tillage, fertilization, disease suppression, organic matter management, irrigation, and simulation models.

Credits

5

ENVS 175 Biotechnology: Social and Environmental Dimensions

Surveys the rapid development of genetic engineering science and biotechnology-based industries and examines the economic, health, environmental, legal, and social justice dimensions of new biotechnology applications: genetic screening, cloning, transgenic animals and crops, genetically engineered food, and biodiversity prospecting. Readings, lectures, World Wide Web site reviews, student presentations, and papers will address controversial choices faced now by scientists, farmers, doctors, consumers, public officials, and global governance agencies.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in ENVS 100 and ENVS 100L, or by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

ENVS 178 Plant Conservation Practicum

Involves independent and group field projects investigating ecology and conservation of rare plants. Also introduces students to the primary literature in plant ecology and conservation. Prior course work in conservation biology, ecology, and plant systematics is recommended. Offered in conjunction with courses 162 and 195B.

Credits

5

ENVS 181 Arboretum Internship

Supervised learning experience working with the faculty and staff, utilizing facilities of the UCSC Arboretum. Students learn general horticultural techniques through work at the Arboretum. They also gain specialized knowledge of plant conservation, systematics, habitat restoration, and plant care. Prerequisite(s): course 100 or Biology 20C and permission of instructor.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

ENVS 193 Field Study

Supervised research or organized projects relating to environmental problems, supplemented by guided individual study. May be repeated for credit with consent of the chairperson of environmental studies. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 193F Field Study

Provides for department-sponsored individual field study in the vicinity of the campus under the direct supervision of a faculty sponsor. May not be counted toward major requirements. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 196A Senior Seminar: Management of Protected Lands

Through selected readings, explores natural reserve and biodiversity management. Completion of an individual/team project related to University of California, Santa Cruz, natural reserves (campus, Younger Lagoon, Fort Ord). Project focus may be on reserve planning and policy, ecological diversity, design and management, or program development. Prerequisite(s): ENVS 100 and ENVS 100L. Enrollment restricted to senior environmental studies majors and by permission of instructor.

Credits

5

Instructor

Michael Loik

Quarter offered

Spring

ENVS 196B Senior Seminar: Methods in Environmental Policy Analysis

Introduction to some of the tools in environmental policy analysis, ranging from quantitative techniques (drawing on economics and statistics) to cross-cutting, qualitative designs. Students perform policy analysis exercises throughout the quarter and evaluate normative dimensions of competing analytic techniques. Prerequisite(s): instructor determination based on student's academic background.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

ENVS 196C Senior Seminar: Methods in Investigating Rural Economies

Introduction to the conceptual and empirical tools used in analysis of the economic geography of rural resource-based activities, such as agriculture, forestry, and fisheries. Students learn to investigate the structure of local production activities and their linkages with regional, national, and global institutions and markets.

Credits

5

ENVS 196D Senior Seminar: Risks, Values, and Choices

Advanced readings and research on environmental risk and public choice and policy. Builds on course 172 and explores the values and choices implicit in conventional risk assessment methodologies as well as those in emergent alternatives, such as the precautionary principle. Prerequisite(s): course 172 and interview to determine level of preparation and appropriateness of background. Enrollment restricted to senior and graduate environmental studies majors and Earth sciences, biology, and economics combined majors.

Credits

5

Instructor

S Rajan

Quarter offered

Spring

ENVS 196E Senior Seminar: Advanced Agroecosystem Analysis

Explores a range of approaches to examine agroecosystem function and concepts of sustainability. The Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems farm and its surrounding habitat will be the major focus of independent or group field research, but off-site locations may also be studied. Students will learn field and analytical techniques, formulate a research project, design a data collection scheme, conduct research, and provide a written analysis and discussion of their results. Prerequisite(s): course 130A or 130B.

Credits

5

Instructor

Carol Shennan

ENVS 196G Senior Seminar: Environmental Problems in Developing Countries' Cities

Using developing countries as an analytical framework, studies problems created by pollution, the use of natural resources, and environmental disasters, as well as the socioeconomic issues associated with them at the local, regional, and global level. Enrollment restricted to senior majors in environmental studies and the combined majors in Earth sciences, biology and economics; interview to determine level of preparation and appropriateness of background.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

ENVS 196J Senior Seminar: Managing Fresh Water Resources

Interdisciplinary investigation of a local/regional water management issue. Students work individually and in teams to identify and characterize a water management issue. Students study how the issue is currently being handled and then propose and describe alternative management approaches. Environmental studies majors have first priority; open to Earth sciences majors.

Credits

5

ENVS 196K Senior Seminar: Sustainable Development in Developing Countries

Analyzes selected topics in policy issues surrounding sustainable development in developing countries. Theoretical issues/definitions of sustainability will be examined, and concrete cases of environmental and natural resource policy choices will be analyzed. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor only with assessment of level and suitability of prior coursework.

Credits

5

Instructor

Alan Richards

ENVS 196M Senior Seminar: Plant Responses to the Environment

This course combines directed field research with independent research projects to examine plant responses to the environment. Students will be introduced to the operation of specialized instrumentation under field conditions. Students will develop a research hypothesis, design an experiment, collect data, and produce a written review of their results.

Credits

5

ENVS 196P Senior Seminar: Regional Foodshed Research Practicum

This course involves supervised individual and group interdisciplinary research on ecological and social justice dimensions of food production and community food security in the Monterey Bay region. Students are expected to actively engage with regional actors, local agencies, and community programs. Prerequisite(s): interview to determine background and interest in doing advanced field research on local agro-food issues with assessment of quality of work in relevant courses.

Credits

5

Instructor

Margaret Fitzsimmons

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

ENVS 196R Senior Seminar: Advanced Research Topics in Applied Ecology

Faculty-facilitated research projects conducted within a central theme to satisfy the senior exit writing requirement. Themes have theoretical and applied components and encompass multiple disciplinary approaches. Examples include Forest Ecology and Exploitation and Transgenic technologies: Science and Policy. Prerequisite(s): student must present theme-based research ideas in interview with instructor.

Credits

5

Instructor

Deborah Letourneau

Quarter offered

Spring

ENVS 196S Senior Seminar: Functions and Processes of Terrestrial Ecosystems

Students present an idea for a project, review relevant literature, develop a research question/hypothesis, design and execute an experiment, collect and analyze data, and write a report. The instructor evaluates the feasibility of each student's project initially. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor only with assessment of level and suitability of prior coursework. Enrollment restricted to seniors.

Credits

5

Instructor

Michael Loik

Quarter offered

Spring

ENVS 196V Senior Seminar: Organic Agriculture Theory and Practice

Interdisciplinary research seminar examining scientific theory and practice of organic agriculture in both biological and social contexts. Research emphasis placed on ecology of organically-managed agroecosystems and the growing market and consumption of organic commodities. Prerequisite(s): course 129, or 130A or 133 or 161; interview to determine level of preparation and appropriateness of background. Enrollment restricted to senior environmental studies majors and the combined majors with biology, Earth sciences, and economics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Carol Shennan

Quarter offered

Fall

ENVS 198 Independent Field Study

Student's supervision is conducted by a regularly appointed officer of instruction by means other than usual supervision in person (e.g., by correspondence) or student is doing all or most of the course work off campus. Prerequisite(s): suitable preparation for fieldwork and facility and competence in subject matter area; students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 198F Independent Field Study

Provides for department-sponsored individual field study off campus for which faculty supervision is not in person but by correspondence. May not be counted toward major requirements. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

ENVS 215 GIS and Environmental Applications

Explores geographic information systems as the technology of digital processing of spatial data, including subsystems of input, storage and retrieval, manipulation and analysis, and data reporting and map output. Applications emphasize GIS as a decision support system for environmental problem solving.

Credits

5

ENVS 260 Economic Institutions and the Environment

Focuses on the economy's utilization of natural resources and ecosystems from the perspectives of New Institutional Economics (NIE) and Ecological Economics (EE). Concepts and tools from NIE and EE are introduced and then explored in the context of the extraction, transformation, transfer (sale), end-use, and deposition/recycling of natural resources. Open to advanced undergraduates with instructor permission.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ECON 260

Instructor

Brent Haddad

Requirements

Open to advanced undergraduates with instructor permission. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

ENVS 262 Property Rights and the Environment

Examines the property rights bases of environmental change and resource-based conflict. Early sessions offer a theoretical understanding of property rights. Subsequent sessions apply the theory to local, national, and international environmental issues and conflicts. Companion course to course 260/Economics 275.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

ECON 262

Instructor

Brent Haddad

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; open to undergraduates with permission of instructor.

ENVS 281C Advanced Readings in Risk and Public Policy

Advanced readings and research on environmental risk and public policy. Explores environmental decision making given the question of the burden of proof and scientific uncertainty and grapples, in an advanced manner, with emergent policy alternatives, such as the precautionary principle. Also offered as course 291C for 3 credits.

Credits

5

Instructor

S Rajan

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): ENVS 172 or equivalent work demonstrated by an interview. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

FILM 80B Seeing Through the '80s: Film and Television

Study of film and television culture in Reagan-era America, focusing on concepts of ideology, post-modernism, and spectacle through an examination of such phenomena as MTV, teen pics, indie cinema, and Rambo.

Credits

5

FILM 141 Information Architecture: Representing Digital Information

Combines critical studies and production exercises that explore how visual information for interactive media is conceptualized, structured, and represented. Readings on historical and contemporary information architecture and interactive design offer models for weekly assignments and a final project.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): FILM 178. Enrollment restricted to film and digital media majors.

FILM 163 Movies on the Border

Surveys a range of cinematic representations of the US-Mexico border region from the 1950s to the present-Hollywood, independent, Chicano/Latino, Mexican. Examines border as concrete physical (trans)location, site of metaphor and projection, and trope for new ways of knowing and being.

Credits

5

Instructor

Julianne Burton-Carvajal

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to film and digital media and Latin American and Latino studies majors.

FILM 167 Issues in Cross-Cultural Representation

A critical exploration of how cultural differences of race, class, gender, and nation are represented in documentary film and video, experimental film, reportage, and fiction film. Changing focus on one or more topics with selected theoretical, critical, and historical readings. Students are billed for a course fee.

Credits

5

FILM 171E Structure of Hollywood

Examines current structure of American film industry tracing history of shifting industrial practices. Who has power in Hollywood? How does the exercise of power affect the creative process? How does it change what we see?

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to film and digital media majors.

FILM 178C Introduction to Digital Media Production

Study of computer tools involving interactive forms and formats. Students will develop both personal and/or collaborative projects for dissemination as digital media, both on screen and online in networked information and communications spaces. Prerequisite(s): course 170A; admission by application at first class meeting; priority given to students who have been accepted into the production concentration. Other students who are not in the production concentration and who have completed course 170 may apply by submitting sample of production work at first class meeting. See the enrollment conditions section in the quarterly Schedule of Classes for other application instructions that may apply.

Credits

5

Instructor

Lawrence Andrews

FILM 185B African American Film

Survey of African American participation and representation within American film which examines the cultural and historical context of racist images in film as well as recent critical and theoretical work on the issues of race and representation. Students are billed for a course fee.

Credits

5

FILM 185C The Exploitation Film

Created to make a quick profit by shocking and titillating audiences with sensational topics, the exploitation film is addressed in terms of its historical significance. Topics include important filmmakers and movements including the drug scare film, the burlesque and nudist camp film, the work of Russ Meyer, John Waters, Doris Wishman, etc. Students are billed for a course fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Margaret Morse

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): FILM 120 or FILM 136A.

FILM 190 Advanced Critical Studies Seminar

Intensive research and writing on a changing topic chosen to demonstrate critical mastery in a specific area of film and/or digital media studies. Prerequisite(s): course 120. Enrollment restricted to senior film and digital media majors accepted into the critical studies concentration.

Credits

5

FILM 191 Critical Studies Thesis Preparation Seminar

Intensive seminar prepares students for writing a critical studies thesis. Designed to be taken prior to enrolling in course 195, seminar guides students through the process of choosing a thesis topic, preparing a bibliography, and drafting a detailed outline. Prerequisite(s): course 190. Enrollment restricted to senior film and digital media majors accepted into the critical studies concentration.

Credits

5

FMST 11 War in Film and Culture

Explores how war films, media, and political discourses about war and violence shape and transform ideas about national identity. Focuses on how ideas about gender, sexuality, race, and class have particularly affected representations of military conflicts. (Formerly course 80P.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Neda Atanasoski

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Winter

FMST 194E History of Sexuality

Explores one of the central texts of dialogue and contestation in sexuality studies today: Michel Foucault's The History of Sexuality. Considers the epistemic challenges outlined in Foucault's early work and engages its instantiations in the proliferating scholarship on gender, sexuality, and critical race studies. Readings challenge the marginalization of empire in Foucault's work and demonstrate that a history of 19th-century European sexuality must also be a history of race. Interview with instructor required. Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; enrollment restricted to senior feminist studies majors.

Credits

5

Instructor

Anjali Arondekar

FMST 194P Religion, Gender, and Politics

Addresses the relationship between religious identities and movements, gender and sexuality, and feminism. Analyzes how media discourses, popular culture, and scholarly writing represent the role of religion and gender in shaping contemporary geopolitics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Neda Atanasoski

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): FMST 1 and FMST 100; and satisfaction of Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to seniors feminist studies majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

FREN 13F Oral Fluency Through Cultural Study

A course for any student beyond level 3, developing oral fluency through discussion of a variety of cultural topics. Listening comprehension and speaking are emphasized through exploration of situations common to France and Francophone countries. May be offered more than once per year.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): FREN 3, FREN 4. FREN 5, FREN 6, or placement by interview.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring

FREN 128 Political Controversies in France between 1920-1940

An exploration of the political currents of the political left and right as manifested in various texts of the interwar period in France. Historical, literary, and political documents are examined. Course complements History 134C, French History, 1914-Present. Conducted in French.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

HAVC 26 Form and Feeling in Indian Art

Rasa is the juice of something, its essence or flavor. In the arts of India, the theory of rasa unites all media. Using rasa theory to examine Indian visual culture, this course looks at painting, sculpture, film, performance, and literature. (Formerly course 80F.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Kirtana Thangavelu

HAVC 32 Western Culture and the Human Visual Imagination

Survey of critical themes and theoretical topics central to historical situations and visual character of Western culture from Early Modern period to present. Addresses issues of particular concern to the visual tradition in Europe and the U.S.: the beginning and end of art, visual regimes of looking and seeing, the idea of the artist, the art market, media and technologies, the role of museums and other exhibition practices. (Formerly course 80S.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Catherine Soussloff

HAVC 80J Visual Cultures of the Middle Ages

Images of power, piety, and belief of the European Middle Ages, circa 200-1450 A.D., from late Roman to late Gothic developments; mosaics, sculpture, pilgrimage tokens, reliquaries, manuscripts, monasteries, stained glass, cathedral architecture, and other media.

Credits

5

Instructor

Virginia Jansen

Quarter offered

Winter

HAVC 120A Early Japanese Temples

The construction and images, and the liturgical, political, and social functions of the principal Japanese temples surviving from the formative period of Japanese history, from approximately 500 to 1100 C.E. These temples are all prime historical and social sites in modern Japan. Most of them are mainly Buddhist, but the religious context of the course will be the general one of Japan during this period, including Shinto.

Credits

5

HAVC 121A Early Chinese History

Neolithic to the first extended age of imperial China (the Han Dynasty, 206 B.C.–220 A.D.). Themes, such as ritual and technology in the language of form, within a cultural and historical framework concluding in the age when representation of everyday life first became prominent.

Credits

5

HAVC 121C Later Chinese History

The arts of China, from the second century A.D. to the 20th century. Architecture, sculpture, ceramics, calligraphy, and painting, setting these in contexts of social structure, political, and cultural values.

Credits

5

HAVC 121D Twentieth-Century Chinese Art

Chinese art during the socially and politically tumultuous 20th century, a period when artists were challenged by an increased awareness of world art and the need to adapt to politically-motivated artistic constraints. General narrative history, leading artists, decisive moments, and poignant questions.

Credits

5

HAVC 125 The Languages of Medieval Visual Culture, c. 300–1500

The visual culture of the European Middle Ages with emphasis on why certain formal languages were used and how they functioned in their societies. One course from the 10 or 80 series or a course in medieval culture is recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Virginia Jansen

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

HAVC 135A Studies in 17th-Century Italian Art

Italian painting and sculpture of the 17th century in cultural and historical contexts, with special attention to figures such as Caravaggio, Carracci, Bernini, and Algardi, and places such as Bologna, Florence, Rome, Genoa, and Naples. Problems considered include the rise of the academies and connoisseurship, art theory, patronage, and definitions of style. (Formerly course 169.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Catherine Soussloff

Repeatable for credit

Yes

HAVC 135C Spectacular Power: Versailles, 1660–1989

The palace and grounds of Versailles as a representation of the French state since the time of Louis XIV. Architecture, garden design, fountains, and fortifications; painting, sculpture, and court ceremony. The links between absolutism and the making of the classic French style are explored. First in a sequence of three courses on French art and its historical context; see courses 177 and 137. (Formerly course 176.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Donna Hunter

HAVC 136A Cathedral Gothic

Theory, form, structure, and social conflict in the building of cathedrals and large churches in western European urban society, 1140-1300, with emphasis on northern France. Course 80A or one course from the 10-series or a course in medieval studies is recommended as preparation. (Formerly course 165A.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Virginia Jansen

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

Quarter offered

Winter

HAVC 136B Gothic Beyond

Parish, friar, and special-purpose churches, chapels, synagogues, and colleges within episcopal, royal, noble, burgher, merchant, and artisan societies throughout western Europe, c.1150–1500, with particular emphasis on Late Gothic structures. Course 80A or one course from the 10-series or a course in medieval studies is recommended as preparation. (Formerly course 165B.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Virginia Jansen

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

HAVC 136D Culture and Society in Early Modern Europe

Visual culture and representation explored through close study of texts, images, and institutions that register the fundamental theoretical and societal changes from the late Middle Ages through the 17th century. Readings in literature, drama, visual art, religion, science, philosophy, and politics. (Formerly course 173.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Catherine Soussloff

Repeatable for credit

Yes

HAVC 141D Feminism and Aesthetics

Addresses the feminist critique of art history and visual culture; queries the viability of a feminist sensibility or politics in visual representation and reception. Approaches these topics through the problem of the representation of the woman artist and the feminine/feminist voice in cultural institutions and discourse. (Formerly course 175.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Catherine Soussloff

HAVC 141G Histories of Video in the U.S.

Introduces students to video art and documentaries from the 1960s to the present. Topics include experiments with multi-channel and installation spaces, community television, new documentary practices, questions of interactivity and narcissism, video's role in democratizing image making by women and people of color, and the digital turn in video.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; previous art history course strongly recommended.

Quarter offered

Winter

HAVC 149E Studies in Medieval Art: Visual Culture in Early Gothic England

Study of architecture, manuscripts, metalwork, sculpture, stained glass, and other arts in England from c. 1170-1250 with focus on the uses which the society of the period made of these works. Appropriate for students with background in medieval culture or who have completed course 10A or its equivalent.

Credits

5

HAVC 154B Architecture and Religion in China

An examination of the built environment—houses and palaces, shrines and temples, walls and gates, monuments and tombs, village and city plans—in relation to cosmological views and religious traditions. Special focus on the Chinese Buddhist monastery.

Credits

5

Instructor

Raoul Birnbaum

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

HAVC 154C Chinese Buddhist Monasteries

Consideration of Buddhist monasteries in China: as built environments set within architectural traditions; as centers for the realization of specific religious aims and practices, with distinctive visual programs to support those aims; and as nodes within social and economic landscapes.

Credits

5

Instructor

Raoul Birnbaum

Quarter offered

Spring

HAVC 164 Early Medieval and Romanesque Architecture

Meaning and form of building in western European society, 1000–1130, within monastic, imperial, ducal, and urban environments. Course 80A or one quarter of the course 10-series or a course in medieval studies is recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Virginia Jansen

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; other interested students should contact the instructor.

HAVC 165 Gothic Architecture

Credits

5

HAVC 189E Exhibition Preparation

The Mary Porter Sesnon Gallery, in conjunction with Art History 181C, The History of UC Santa Cruz Campus Plan, will be organizing an exhibit entitled, Inside the Large Small House: The Residential Design Legacy of William Wurster. The project introduces students to the general methods of organizing and mounting an exhibition; including research, design, and production of a catalog. Provides hands-on experience in gallery management and curation.

Credits

5

HAVC 189K Feminist Art/Feminist Theory 1970-Present

The relationships of feminist art to feminist political writing and theory, including feminist artistic and literary debates about essentialism, constructionism, race, class, gender, preference, psychoanlaysis, film theory, pornography, identity politics, postmodernism, and queer theory.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

HAVC 189N Impressionism

Focusing on work of artists Monet, Degas, Morisot, Cassatt, Caillebotte, and others, course themes include development of a Parisian avant-garde, representing modernity, new art exhibition strategies, issues of gender in/and representation, and rise of landscape painting. Prerequisite(s): course 137 recommended.

Credits

5

HAVC 189R Postmodernism and Visual Culture

Theories of postmodern culture, from the writing of Jameson, Baudrillard, Lyotard, Hutcheon, Eagleton, Harvey, and others, and the interconnections between these theoretical positions and contemporary visual culture, centering on cinema, painting, and photography.

Credits

5

HAVC 189W Performance Anxiety in 17th-Century Dutch Painting: Portraits, Still Lifes, and Other Genres

The acts of posing and painting, called portraits, studied as aesthetic performances within a system of genres and as representational strategies that respond to peculiar instabilities—social, political, and economic—of the Dutch Republic during the Eighty Years' War.

Credits

5

Instructor

Harry Berger

HAVC 196A Built Environments of Medieval Cities

Roads, bridges, walls, market squares, civic buildings, hospitals, houses, churches, and districts in the economic, social, and political environments of the medieval urban fabric. Recommended for students with background in medieval, urban, or architectural studies. Course can be taken for senior exit credit only by permission of the instructor. (Formerly course 190J.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Virginia Jansen

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to juniors and seniors.

HAVC 196B The Individual and Tradition in Chinese Painting of the 17th Century

Embracing the last great transition between imperial dynasties in China, the 17th century was a period of extraordinary creativity in Chinese painting. Both the proponents of traditional values and the seekers after viable individualism were equally vigorous and inventive. Much of their work still has a strong and immediate appeal to the eyes and minds of today. Explores both the working of this period and the nature of its continuing appeal. (Formerly course 191I.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

HAVC 196C The Real in America

Examination of the changing perceptions of the real in American culture from Realism and Naturalism to Photorealism and Virtual Reality. Course emphasizes what the changing perceptions of the real tell us about American culture. (Formerly course 191N.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Martin Berger

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to juniors and seniors.

Quarter offered

Spring

HAVC 196F Mountains and Religion in China

Topical approach to the visual culture of mountains in Chinese history-encompassing both imaginative constructions and physical realities-especially in relation to religious practices. Considers examples and contexts in relation to such topics as pilgrimage, local and state religion, and individual or group retreat and reclusion. Enrollment restricted to junior and senior history of art and visual culture majors and by permission. Prerequisite(s): a previous course on Chinese history or culture (in such departments as history of art and visual culture, history, literature, or anthropology); instructor determines if prerequisite is met. Can be taken for senior exit credit only by permission of the instructor.

Credits

5

Instructor

Raoul Birnbaum

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to junior and senior history of art and visual culture majors.

HAVC 196G Word and Image in Chinese Culture

The Chinese tradition, from the earliest material evidence to the most recent, has persistently emphasized a close relationship between written language and pictorial image. This concern has appeared equally in artifactual and theoretical form. Its best known representation is in the association of calligraphy with painting. Course examines the evolution and meaning of that association. A knowledge of the Chinese language is not necessary. Can be taken for senior exit credit only by permission of the instructor. (Formerly course 190G.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to junior and senior history of art and visual culture majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

HAVC 196I The Philosophy of Art

This course will examine the ways in which the work of art appears in philosophical writings in the European tradition from Greek times to the present. The readings will be chosen for the ways in which the ideological and theoretical aspects of art are addressed by philosophy. (Formerly course 190N.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Catherine Soussloff

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to junior and senior history of art and visual culture, art, literature, history, philosophy, and politics majors. Can be taken for senior exit credit only by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter

HAVC 201B Introduction to Visual Studies and Critical Theory

Introduces the visual studies discipline and primary texts that have made significant contributions to it. Explores theoretical discourses that have proven influential and productive for practitioners of visual studies, in a range of thematic foci and cultural contexts. Features intensive readings and student-led discussions. Students continue to work on the research topic they selected in course 201A. (Formerly course 202, Theories of the Visual.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment isrestricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

HAVC 203 Theories and Histories of Seeing

Provides an in-depth case study of the visual practices and culture of a specific society. Builds on the foundation established by courses 201 and 202, offering sustained application of the general methods and theories to which students were previously introduced. The society under consideration rotates each year depending on the research interest of the faculty member teaching the course in any given spring.

Credits

5

Instructor

Donna Hunter

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HAVC 201 and HAVC 202. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

HEBR 1A Intensive Elementary Hebrew

Accelerated course covers Hebrew 1 and part of Hebrew 2. Designed for motivated beginning students. Students develop skills in speaking, reading, writing, and listening to real-life Hebrew.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

HEBR 1B Intensive Elementary Hebrew

Accelerated course covers Hebrew 2 and all of Hebrew 3. In this course, students who have successfully completed course 1A (or its equivalent) continue to develop competence in speaking, reading, writing, and listening to real-life Hebrew.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HEBR 1A, or HEBR 2, or by consent of instructor, or placement by examination.

Quarter offered

Winter

HEBR 5 Second-Year Hebrew

Development of the students' familiarity with the spoken and written language through grammar review, discussions, and vocabulary building. Varied readings on literary and cultural topics related to modern Israel. (Formerly Intermediate Hebrew.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HEBR 4 or by consent of instructor.

HEBR 6 Intermediate Hebrew

Development of the students' familiarity with the spoken and written language through grammar review, discussions, and vocabulary building. Varied readings on literary and cultural topics related to modern Israel.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HEBR 5. Students interested in this course who have not taken the prerequisite should meet with the instructor prior to the first class meeting.

Quarter offered

Spring

HEBR 106 Israel's Struggle for Identity as Seen Through Israeli Cinema

Examines, through the medium of film, Israel's struggle for identity since its founding as a modern state. Taught in English with a weekly discussion section in Hebrew. Readings in English and Hebrew; writing, film analysis, cultural commentary, and other assignments in Hebrew.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tammi Rossman-Benjamin

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HEBR 5 (or equivalent).

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Spring

HISC 80H Marxism

Advanced introduction to the main currents of Marxism from the 19th century to the present. Lectures and discussion address Marx's conceptions of capitalism, later attempts to theorize the political, and philosophical and aesthetic consequences of this critique.

Credits

5

Instructor

Gopal Balakrishnan

Quarter offered

Winter

HISC 80J Social Movements in the U.S.

Traces the history of social movements in the late 19th- and 20th-century U.S., including populism, labor, socialism, Communism, the New Left, civil rights, feminism. Looks at the relationship between cultures of protest and mainstream popular and political cultures.

Credits

5

Instructor

Barbara Epstein

HISC 80Q Science as Culture and Practice

Using tools from the analysis of social history, visual and material culture, narrative, and laboratory and field practices, introduces students to modern science, technology, and medicine studies. Examples come especially from 20th- and 21st-century life and human and information sciences.

Credits

5

Instructor

Donna Haraway

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

HISC 80H Marxism

Credits

HISC 80J Social Movements in the U.S.

Credits

HISC 80Q Science as Culture and Practice

Credits

HISC 217A Seminar: Topics in Feminist Theory

Studies in the theory and history of feminist consciousness; analysis of the main areas of a specifically feminist interest; determination of the theoretical bases for a distinctively feminist perspective on the principal problems of the life and human sciences; examination of relations of class, race, and gender in feminist theory and practice.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

HISC 217B Seminar: Topics in Feminist Theory

Writing intensivecourse based on readings in course 217A.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HISC 217A. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

HISC 218A Postcolonial Theory

Study of selected topics in postcolonial theory, including decolonizing critiques of Western knowledges and epistemologies, nationalism, gender and sexuality, cultural representations of neo-colonialism and imperialism, subalternity, history and historical transformation, and global relations of dominations.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

HISC 222A Theories of Late Capitalism

Looks at the theoretical literature on what is variously called late capitalism/postindustrialism/postfordism, and in that context considers the rise of nationalism and identity politics in the latter part of the 20th century. The primary focus is on the U.S. and Western Europe, but questions of the globalization of capital and the transformation of relations between the West and the Third World are also considered. Written work for the course consists of weekly short papers. (Formerly Theories of Late Capitalism, Nationalism, and the Politics of Identity.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Barbara Epstein

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

HISC 225 The Politics of Affect

Point of departure is the question of the political, posed with respect to psychoanalysis. The underlying question is what the political does to psychoanalysis, but also what the unconscious does to the political.

Credits

5

Instructor

David Marriott

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

HISC 228 Fundamental Problems of Metapolitics

Focuses on seminal works of political thought: the first half devoted to ancient and modern classics; the second considering several major contemporary reflections. Aims to reconstruct and assess the claims regarding epistemic conditions and criteria of metapolitical judgment.

Credits

5

Instructor

Gopal Balakrishnan

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

HISC 233A Theories of Modernity and Postmodernity

Study of social and cultural theories of modernity and postmodernity; analysis of various conceptualizations of the modern and the postmodern and their relation to production, history, aesthetics, cultural identity, social struggle; texts from a variety of disciplines (literature, sociology, philosophy).

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

HISC 233B Theories of Modernity and Postmodernity

Writing intensive course based on readings in course 233A.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HISC 233A. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

HISC 234A Social Movements in the 20th-Century U.S.

The history of major social movements in the 20th-century U.S., including populism, labor, socialism and communism, civil rights, the women's movement, the anti-nuclear movement. Various theoretical perspectives on the rise and fall of social movements.

Credits

5

Instructor

Barbara Epstein

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

HISC 234B Social Movements in the 20th-Century U.S.

Writing intensive course based on readings in course 234A.

Credits

5

Instructor

Barbara Epstein

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HISC 234A. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

HISC 239A The Dialectical Legacy

From Adorno to Zizek rediscoveries of Hegel have provided the impetus for some of the most innovative currents of 20th-century Marxism. Examines the philosophical and historical problems that Marx inherited from Hegel through close readings of their major works.

Credits

5

Instructor

Gopal Balakrishnan

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

HISC 239B The Dialectical Legacy

From Adorno to Zizek rediscoveries of Hegel have provided the impetus for some of the most innovative currents of 20th-century Marxism. Examines the philosophical and historical problems that Marx inherited from Hegel through close readings of their major works.

Credits

5

Instructor

Gopal Balakrishnan

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

HISC 251A Readings in Science Studies

Focus is on recent literature in social, cultural, and historical studies of science, medicine, and technology. This seminar familiarizes students with current scholarly debates, research networks, national traditions, international exchanges, conference proceedings, interdisciplinary projects, and publication sites.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

HISC 251B Readings in Science Studies

Second quarter of two-quarter course. Writing-intensive course based on the readings studied in course 251A.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite: HISC 251A. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

HISC 253A Topics in Cultural Analysis

Advanced graduate seminar in which students do research on focused topics. Each quarter centered on single thematic area. Students read works of culture-theory and exemplary studies illustrating methodologies, problems, and current controversies. Prerequisite(s): minimum of second-year status in the history of consciousness program; instructor evaluates student's ability to participate. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

HISC 255 Carl Schmitt: Political and Legal Order in Modern Thought

Students study the main translated texts of Carl Schmitt's work, as well as certain secondary commentary on his body of thought. (Formerly course 255A.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Gopal Balakrishnan

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 1 Theories of History/Theories of Society

European social thought understands society to be the product of the historical process. Readings from early-modern natural law thinkers (Hobbes, Lock, Rousseau), 19th-century theorists of the democratic and industrial revolutions (Tocqueville, Marx), and 20th-century social scientists (Weber, Braudel), explore the nature of this fertile connection.

Credits

5

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 3 Slavery in World History

Although most teaching and research on slavery has focused on slavery in the Americas (and not always from a comparative perspective), the institution of slavery has been part of societies in nearly every part of the world. This course addresses questions such as the shape slavery took in different times and places, the bases and justification for enslavement, who could or could not be enslaved, occupational employment, possibilities for manumission, and the weaning or abolition of the institution. The last third is dedicated to slavery in the Americas. (Formerly course 36.)

Credits

5

HIS 5B Early Christianity: First to Fourth Century A.D.

Christianity from its origins as a Jewish messianic movement, its expansion in multiple forms in the Greco-Roman world and the East, to its transformation into the major religion of the Roman and Byzantine empires.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 7 Archives and Public History

Through readings on local history topics and bi-weekly field expeditions, students discover different types of archives and historical repositories, the diversity of sources that they contain, and the varied uses to which they can be put. Course also explores the range of career opportunities open to history majors (sometimes loosely grouped together under the rubric public history).

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 14 Race and Ethnicity in the U.S

An introductory course on the racial/ethnic history of the U.S. Of central concern are issues of race, ethnicity, oppression, resistance, mass migrations, city life in urban America, and power and protest in modern America. Priority enrollment to freshmen and sophomores.

Credits

5

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 43 Traditional India

A survey of the early histories of Indus Valley, Vedism, the epics, Buddhism, Jainism, with an exploration among original sources: archaeological, visual, ritual, literary, and epic texts. Thematic focus on communities, social systems, elite and popular cultures, and their mutual interaction. (Formerly Histories of Traditional India)

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 65B Europe, 1000-1500

Reviews major social, political, economic, and cultural developments in Europe from 1000 to 1500 and themes including gender, warfare, ethnicity and religion, through primary sources and secondary readings. Primary focus is Western Europe: England, France, the Iberian Peninsula, the Holy Roman Empire, the Low Countries, and Italy.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nuria Silleras-Fernandez

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 80H Class, Gender, and Community in China, 1700-Present

Examines gender, sexuality, and family across classes in late imperial China, and the transformation of all three by revolution (and vice versa). Concentrates throughout on gender as a category of historical analysis that has remained largely invisible in the construction of conventional Chinese history.

Credits

5

Instructor

Gail Hershatter

General Education Code

CC

HIS 80Q History and Public Policy

An examination of the history of public policy in the U.S. considering the changing political, racial, and gender ideologies that have informed social policies over time and led to inequality in American society. Students are required to have a field placement in addition to class time. Will be offered in the 2002–03 academic year.

Credits

5

HIS 101A The Making of the Modern World, 1400-1750

Focuses on the transformation of many different societies of Asia, Africa, and the Americas from 1400 to 1750 through case histories and the comparative study of European colonial hegemony, labor systems, global economic exchange, missions, and warfare.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 101B The Making of the Modern World, 1750-1950

The history of the world from 1750. Focuses on the liberal project (the industrial and democratic revolutions) and its impact on the world—slavery and abolition, self-strengthening movements, race and class, imperialism, colonialism, and nationalism.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 107 Religion and Modernity

Explores the impact of modernity on a variety of religious traditions. Examines the rise of secularism and the phenomenon of disenchantment; the invention of religion; and the emergence of fundamentalism in the modern period.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nathaniel Deutsch

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 108 Social Movements in Historical Perspective

Readings examine 18th- through 20th-century social movements and related phenomena in Europe/America: examples include Tulipomania; revolutionary action in France; U.S. Civil Rights movement; and the environmental and feminist movements. Lectures focus on social science frameworks used to explore the social base, tactics, success or failure, and inter-relationships of social movements as a distinctive mode of social change.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 115A U.S. Labor History to 1919

Explores the history of work, working-class people, and the labor movement in the U.S., with attention to race and gender dynamics as well as to the development of workers' organizations.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dana Frank

American History and Institutions

Yes

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

HIS 115B U.S. Labor History, 1919 to the Present

Explores the history of work, working-class people, and the labor movement in the U.S. in global perspective with attention to race and gender dynamics and political-economic changes.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dana Frank

American History and Institutions

Yes

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 115C Learning from the U.S. Great Depression

Examines U.S. society, politics, and culture during the 1930s, with emphasis on the relationship between social movements and public policy, and dynamics of race, ethnicity, immigration, and gender, and dynamics between labor, business, and the state.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dana Frank

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 127 Race and the American City

History of racial and ethnic minorities in the American city in the 19th and 20th centuries. Examines the experiences of several non-white groups, with analyses of race, class, culture, gender, acculturation, and implications for social policy in the urban environment.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

American History and Institutions

Yes

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 129 History and Public Policy

Helps students better understand the various social/economic/political issues of public policy by providinga historical perspective analysis. Each student is required to participate in a public history/public service internship.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

American History and Institutions

Yes

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 132 History of the Caribbean: Colonial Period

A study of the Caribbean from the conquest to the abolition of slavery in the 19th century. Focus on the Greater Antilles, particularly the Spanish Caribbean. Emphasis on economic and social issues such as colonialism and the role of sugar production, slavery, and race/ethnicity in these multicultural societies.

Credits

5

Instructor

Maria Diaz

HIS 133 Topics in Colonial Latin American History, Early and Middle Period

Studies Pre-18th century colonial Latin America, with particular emphasis on Peru and Mexico. Topics include: strategies of colonization; cities and urban life; and knowledge, technology, and the professions (ethnographic projects, indigenous intellectuals, schools and universities, medicine and hospitals, the law and the courts).

Credits

5

Instructor

Maria Diaz

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 135A Brazil to 1889

Exploration of the social history of colonial and imperial Brazil. Material progresses chronologically and thematically from the pre-contact indigenous societies that were encountered in South America to the colonization of Brazil through independence to the 19th-Century empire that ended in 1889.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 135B Brazil Since 1889

Exploration of the social history of the Brazilian republic. Course passes chronologically and thematically from the end of the Empire in 1889 to present-day Brazilian films, texts, and lectures.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 140A History of China

China to 1644. Examines the origins and development of the Chinese political and cultural order, including intellectual and religious systems, the imperial state, village and urban life, the family system, gender hierarchy, economic transformation, millenarianism and rebellion. (Formerly course 150A.)

Credits

5

HIS 140F Modern China

Explores aspects of Chinese history from the 16th to the 21st Century. Analyzes modernization movements, nationalism, the party-state regime, gender and family, minority policies, human rights, the Chinese legal system, national identity, and the Chinese diaspora.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 148 Cinema and History: Film Author Satyajit Ray

Satyajit Ray is widely acclaimed as a master of world cinema. Course considers his work to examine authorship at multiple levels: the cultural, historical, social, and familial contexts and the relationship of his film to fiction, the politics and poetics of his vision, and its relationship to colonial, nationalist, and postcolonial India. Also studies the question of gender and the underclass.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 153 Mediterranean Empire, 1100–1500

Political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Crown of Aragon, a major medieval Mediterranean power which failed to survive the transition to the modern world. Emphasis on interaction between diverse ethnic/religious groups within and outside of the Crown.

Credits

5

Instructor

Brian Catlos

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HIS 32, HIS 33, or HIS 163.

HIS 154A Classic Islamic Civilization

The civilization of Islam to 1258 A.D. Origins and early florescence, an international civilization, the coming of the steppe peoples. (Formerly course 161.)

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 154B Islam in the Modern World, 1500 to the Present

Surveys the history of modern Islamic societies from the emergence of the regional gunpowder empires (Ottoman Turkish, Safevi Persian, Mughal Indian) in the 16th century to their subsequent transformations in the new global context of Western hegemony and the world market. (Formerly course 162.)

Credits

5

HIS 160B Greek Art and Archaeology

An introduction to the physical manifestations of ancient Greece, with emphasis on the various interpretative strategies for deciphering the cultural meanings of the material object. The specific topic of the course rotates among the following: Aegean Bronze Age; Dark Ages and Archaic Period; Classical Greece; the Hellenistic World. (Formerly course 102.)

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

HIS 162 Canaan, Israel, and Palestine from Polytheism to Monotheism

This social and cultural history of Israel begins with the rise of the Israelite monarchy and ends in the early Roman period. Economy, political organization, and religious practices and beliefs such as polytheism and monotheism are compared with those of neighboring peoples. Priority given to history majors.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 163A A History of Sin

Ancient and modern conceptions of sin, and remedies offered for it. Course is not a theology of sin and redemption, but an invitation to reflect on ways sin and fault have been imagined and formulated. (Formerly course 163.)

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 165 The Power of Writing: Books and Libraries 600-1500

Surveys how books were made and used in Europe from 600-1500. Focuses on the relationship between book production and the development of libraries. Meets in Special Collections, McHenry Library. Exhibition as class project.

Credits

5

Instructor

Elisabeth Remak-Honnef

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 168 Rise of the Dutch Republic

Focuses on the origin of the Republic in the revolt against Spanish overlordship, and its political, social, and economic development in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 178D Russian Intellectual History

Focus on the emergence in 19th-century Russia of a westernized intelligentsia; its effort both to assimilate western ideas and to define the destinies of Russia; the shaping of the Russian revolutionary movement. Readings in Dostoyevsky, Turgenev, Herzen, and representative Russian Slavophils, Populists, and Nihilists.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 180B English History

Considers how Britain became the pacemaker of modernity in the 18th and 19th centuries; how national, regional, class, and gender identities formed and altered; and how Britain coped with loss of global power in the 20th century.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 185H Women, Gender, and Jewish Modernity (1800-Present)

Explores the impact of modernization upon women and the concepts of gender, both feminine and masculine, in Jewish societies across Europe, the Middle East, and India.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nathaniel Deutsch

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 190S Women and Social Movements in the U.S

Examines history of women and social movements in the U.S., such as abolitionism, anti-lynching, Chinese and Jewish garment workers, Chicana farm labor activism, the American Indian Movement, the Ku Klux Klan, and the Civil Rights movement.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dana Frank

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements, two upper-division history courses, or permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior history majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 194X The Cold War in the Mediterranean, 1942-1991

Writing-intensive course on the Mediterranean. Topics include: U.S. relations with the region (including direct and indirect intervention), local responses, and cultural transformations. Students pursue advanced research using primary and secondary sources.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements and two upper-division history courses. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior history majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 204D Race, Gender, and Colonialism Research Seminar

Reading and research seminar for graduate students interested in gender, colonialism, nationalism, and race. Topics include theories and methods employed in different chronological and national contexts. (Formerly course 225.)

Credits

5

HIS 210C Readings in U.S. History

Introduction to major themes and controversies in the interpretation of U.S. history. Readings cover both chronological eras and topical subjects, often in a comparative context: 20th century.

Credits

5

Instructor

Matthew Lasar

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate history majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

HNDI 1 Elementary Hindi

An in-depth introduction to modern Hindi including the Devanagari script. Through a combination of graded text, written assignments, audiovisual material and computer-based exercises, provides cultural insights and increases proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Hindi. Emphasis on spontaneous self-expression.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

HNDI 2 Elementary Hindi

An in-depth introduction to modern Hindi including the Devanagari script. Through a combination of graded text, written assignments, audiovisual material and computer-based exercises, provides cultural insights and increases proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Hindi. Emphasis on spontaneous self-expression.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HNDI 1 or permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter

HNDI 3 Elementary Hindi

An in-depth introduction to modern Hindi including the Devanagari script. Through a combination of graded text, written assignments, audiovisual material and computer-based exercises, provides cultural insights and increases proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Hindi. Emphasis on spontaneous self-expression.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HNDI 2 or permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

HNDI 3A Urdu Script

Introduction to writing and reading Urdu script (a modified Perso-Arabic right-to-left script) through the medium of Devanagari script (a Sanskrit-based left-to-right script). Urdu and Hindi are grammatically equivalent languages that differ most noticeably in their writing systems.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HNDI 2 or equivalent; knowledge of Devanagari script.

Quarter offered

Spring

HNDI 4 Intermediate Hindi

Continuation and completion of in-depth introductory sequence in modern Hindi including Devanagari script. Through combination of graded text, written assignments, audiovisual material, and computer-based exercises, provides cultural insights and increases proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Hindi. Emphasis on spontaneous self-expression.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HNDI 3 or equivalent; familiarity with Devanagari script.

Quarter offered

Fall

HNDI 5 Intermediate Hindi

Readings in Devanagari of Hindi and Urdu prose and poetry. Introduction to variety of literary forms and styles aimed at developing cultural competence along with language skills. Oral and written composition, coupled with video and web-based material, to develop communicative proficiency.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HNDI 4.

Quarter offered

Winter

HNDI 6 Intermediate Hindi

Readings in Devanagari of Hindi and Urdu prose and poetry. Introduction to variety of literary forms and styles aimed at developing cultural competence along with language skills. Oral and written composition, coupled with video and web-based material, to develop communicative proficiency.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HNDI 5.

Quarter offered

Spring

HNDI 99 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

HNDI 99F Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

HNDI 199 Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

HNDI 199F Tutorial

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

JWST 101 Jewish Studies: Methods and Approaches

Examines scholarship about Jewish cultures, communities, and intellectual through the prisms of a variety of disciplines: history, anthropology, literature, feminist studies, biblical commentary, art history, philosophy, and music. Seeks to equipment students with a sophisticated understanding of the methods scholars have used to illuminate both the coherence and the diversity of Jewish experience from antiquity through the 20th Century.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Winter

KRSG 10 Academic Success

Helps students develop study skills, writing skills, critical reading and thinking skills, test-taking strategies, strategies for stress reduction, and time-management skills. Students evaluated on attendance at class, attendance at individual meetings with instructor, and preparation of weekly assignments. Enrollment restricted to college members and by permission of college advisor.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

KRSG 60A Film and the Politics of Representation

Introduces students to the study of film and focuses on the terminology and techniques, the broader political implications of film, and its impact on postmodern America.

Credits

2

Instructor

B Faunce

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and C1 or C requirements. Enrollment is restricted to college members.

KRSG 60B Memoir/Autobiography Workshop

Students read excerpts of memoirs, autobiographies, and semi-autobiographical short stories, and write sections of a memoir or autobiography and a final self-reflection/evaluation on the course.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and C1 or C requirements. Enrollment is restricted to college members.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

KRSG 60D Literary Journalism

Introduction to literary journalism, emphasizing contemporary issues in California. Students read and analyze articles that use creative strategies to grip readers, and develop their own narrative style by writing their own pieces.

Credits

2

Instructor

Leslie Lopez

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and C or C2 requirements. Enrollment is restricted to college members.

Quarter offered

Spring

KRSG 60E Alternative Media

Investigates many forms of alternative media, including news and arts/intermedia. Students compare alternative news sources (e.g. Democracy Now) to traditional sources (e.g. daily newspaper). Students also study Intermedia movements (e.g. Fluxus) and focus on contemporary magazine culture.

Credits

2

Instructor

Roxanne Hamilton

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to college members.

Quarter offered

Winter

KRSG 60H Media Coverage of Major Events

Examines how media coverage of major news events in the past half century varied from outlet to outlet as well as with time and perspective, and how that varied coverage affected events. Analyzes coverage that was particularly insightful, bizarre, visionary, exemplary, biased, or simply inadequate. Events examined range from the very broad to the very specific and include: the civil rights struggle, the Manson murders, the Union Carbide disaster, and the mass suicide in Jonestown.

Credits

3

Instructor

Patricia Farrell

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to college members.

Quarter offered

Spring

KRSG 60I Juvenile Justice in the 21st Century

Examines theoretical and practical aspects of the juvenile justice system in California, with the goal of providing an understanding of some of the major legal issues in dealing with child abuse, neglect, and delinquency. Provides basic tools for understanding legal research and writing; an overview of the field of juvenile justice; and practical firsthand exposure to the juvenile court system.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to college members during priority enrollment.

Quarter offered

Spring

KRSG 60J Journalism Workshop: Print and Radio

Introductory course in radio and print journalism, focusing on news analysis, reporting techniques, story construction, and the craft of writing. Students also work on voice development and public-speaking skills, as well as ethics and community context. Satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; students must submit a writing sample to the instructor. (Formerly College Eight 60.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Quarter offered

Spring

KRSG 60K The Art of Comedy: Literature and Performance

Students analyze comedic writing and practice writing comedy. Students develop pieces to be delivered in a performance at the end of the quarter.

Credits

3

Instructor

Elizabeth McKenzie

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to college members.

Quarter offered

Winter

KRSG 60L Anti-Museum I: Poetic Imagination Tool Kit

Reinvents the museum as we know it by using the perceptual tools of poetic imagination to create fundamental alternatives to the known forms of museum. Weekly readings, presentations, and projects culminate in a collective exhibition of student-created anti-museums.

Credits

3

KRSG 60M Community Mural

Through lecture, demonstrations, and hands-on projects, students develop the skills to successfully complete a mural. Generating the idea, completing the design, submitting a proposal, and painting a mural are covered.

Credits

3

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to college members.

KRSG 66 Introduction to Feature Writing

A feature story should grab readers and keep them reading until the end of the piece. By reading and writing published features, students discover how this process works. During the quarter, students write two types of articles chosen from the following: roundup, trend, profile, or seasonal pieces.

Credits

2

Instructor

Patricia Farrell

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to college members.

Quarter offered

Winter

KRSG 70 Do-It-Yourself Filmmaking: From Writing to Releasing

Practical and hands-on approach leads students through the laborious and labyrinthine process of making and distributing an independent narrative feature film.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to college members during priority enrollment.

Quarter offered

Spring

KRSG 120E Discourses in the Social Sciences

Explores fundamental vocabulary, discourses and concerns of the social sciences through critical engagement of texts. The final paper may be on a topic assigned in a course in the student's discipline.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

KRSG 120F Writing and Science

Addresses the fundamentals of scientific observations/interpretations and effective writing. Students engage in response groups and faculty conferences to produce a collaborative trail guide, and, a lab report or essay-one which may have been assigned in another course.

Credits

3

Quarter offered

Winter

KRSG 163 Oral History

An examination of oral history as a historical method and a study of narrative strategies and meanings. Readings include a range of work based on interview techniques. Both critical writing and individual oral history projects are required.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

LALS 80A Peoples and Cultures of the Americas: Trends and Issues

Anthropological in approach, concentrates on how Latin America's image is constructed and studied today. Topics include geographies, nationalities, social classes, ethnicities, gender, ecologies, regions, cultural areas, folklore, revolutions, and rural and urban societies.

Credits

5

Instructor

Guillermo Delgado-P

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Winter

LALS 80C Power and Resistance in the Americas: Cross-Border Social Movements

Focuses on politics of power and resistance regarding major cross-border issues facing Latin Americans and Latinos in the 21st century. Emphasizes migration and migrant organizing; neoliberal free trade and implications for labor; organizing by women's, indigenous, and ecological movements; and for democracy and human rights. Many specific cases drawn from binational Central American experiences.

Credits

5

Instructor

Susanne Jonas, Guillermo Delgado-P

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

LALS 80I Gender and Global Cinema

Applies critical and historical approaches to the study of gender in global cinema. Introduces students to different aesthetic and cross-cultural approaches to representing gender in contemporary film. Focuses on films, documentaries, and video works from the Americas as well as from other regions of the global South.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring

LALS 80M Introduction to Mayan History and Literature

An introductory lecture and discussion course on literature and history of Mayan people of Mexico and Guatemala in the last 500 years; concentration also on representation of the Maya by westerners since the invasion of 1492.

Credits

5

Instructor

George Wilson

Quarter offered

Fall

LALS 80N Drug Wars in the Americas

Discusses impact of illegal drugs in societies and cultures of the Americas. Covers recent debates concerning legalization of drugs, illegal trafficking, state policy calling for eradication, military intervention, and stands of civil society on this issue. Studies origins and history of illegal drugs, causes of their persistence, and evaluates recent reactions to proposals that affect human communities in Latin America and the U.S.

Credits

5

Instructor

Guillermo Delgado-P

Quarter offered

Winter

LALS 80Q Musica Latina: Music of Latin America and the Caribbean

Surveys various musical forms and styles that have developed in Latin America and Latino communities in the U.S. Discusses concept of hybridity and grapples with this as a central issue in the evolution of Latin American/Latino music. Addresses migration of music, which not only contributes to its distribution but also to the evolvement of musical practices of forms, styles and genres across borders. (Formerly Musica Latina.)

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

LALS 80R Organizing Across the Americas

Analyzes the range of theory and practice that emerged from and shaped significant social movements during the rise and fall of United States hegemony. Focuses on social struggles and revolutions in five distinct locations across the Americas: the United States (United Farm Workers--UFW), Cuba (Movimiento 26 de Julio--M26J), Nicaragua (Frente Sandinista de Liberacion Nacional--F.S.L.N.), Mexico (Zapatistas), and Brazil (Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra--MST).

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, John Borrego

Quarter offered

Fall

LALS 100L Writing Lab

This course accompanies course 100A. Participants receive feedback and guidance on their written exercises required for course 100A. Students submit drafts in advance and receive feedback from course 100A writing tutors as well as engage in peer-to-peer learning. Consistent attendance is required.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): concurrent enrollment in LALS 100A required. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior Latin American and Latino studies majors, minors, and combined majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

LALS 100W Politics and Society: Concepts and Methods

Focuses on social science issues through the interdisciplinary analysis of power relations. Compares diverse analytical strategies, assesses contending explanations, and builds practical research skills in the field of Latin American and Latino Studies. Topics change yearly, but can include environmental justice, access to education, political participation, gender, and migration. Prerequisite(s): courses 100, and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment restricted to sophomore, junior, and senior Latin American and Latino studies majors, minors, and combined majors with global economics, sociology, literature, and politics. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 100A.

Credits

7

Instructor

Flora Lu

Quarter offered

Winter

LALS 101 Media Skills and Literacy

Applied course where students learn about broadcast, audiovisual, and digital media. Students compile a media production portfolio of various assignments that have a Latino/Latin American focus. (Formerly Using Media.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): concurrent enrollment in LALS 101L.

Quarter offered

Winter

LALS 101L Media Laboratory

Trains students in the fundamentals of media literacy skills, including preparation, production, and post-production. (Formerly Using Media: Video Laboratory.)

Credits

2

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): concurrent enrollment in LALS 101.

LALS 102 Writing for Latin America and Latino Studies Majors and Minors

For Latin American and Latino studies students who wish to gain greater awareness of rhetorical modes and the academic essay. Students write several academic essays, each with a different purpose, and master the conventions of revising and editing. (Formerly Advanced Expository Writing Workshop.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to. Latin American and Latino studies majors, minors, and combined majors.

Quarter offered

Fall

LALS 111 U.S. - Mexico Borderlands

Global and national forces have transformed the 2,000-mile United States-Mexico border region into a site of increased militarization, surveillance, and detention. This course analyzes how increased policing and criminalization has affected borderland communities, identities, and subjectivities. (Formerly The U.S.-Mexican Border Region.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Quarter offered

Spring

LALS 120 Cultures of the Sacred

Comprehensive seminar on notions of the sacred, dealing with the complexities of magic and religious themes in the Americas as seen from an anthropological perspective. Topics include both popular religion as well as non-Christian religious practices. Based on recent anthropological literature, as well as new developments concerning rituals related to the sacred (spiritualism, voodoo, santeria, magical curing, spirit possession, glossolalia, earth feeding, rituals of reciprocity).

Credits

5

Instructor

Guillermo Delgado-P

Quarter offered

Spring

LALS 141 Latino Communities and Economic Development

Examines the economic experiences of Latinas/os in the U.S. and underlying conditions of Latino workers, Hispanic businesses, and Latino community development. By examining their economic status, profiles Latino workers, the self-employed, and communities by region, cultural differences, age, gender, education, and immigrant make-up.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Spring

LALS 142A Central America: Revolution, Intervention, and Social Change

Historical and contemporary overview of the region. More detailed focus on conditions generating popular and revolutionary movements in Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala during the 1980s; U.S. policy responses; and peace negotiation processes. Examines prospects for Central America in the 21st century including migration to the U.S.

Credits

5

Instructor

Susanne Jonas

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Winter

LALS 142B The Caribbean: Revolution, Intervention, and Social Change

Focuses on the political economy and recent/contemporary processes of social transformation in Cuba, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and English-speaking Caribbean countries; U.S. role in the region; Caribbean migrant communities in the U.S.

Credits

5

LALS 146 Urban Crisis in the Americas

Multidisciplinary course on the cities of Latin America and Latino barrios in the U.S. Examines how cities have been constituted spatially, economically, and culturally from the Pre-Columbian era to the present.

Credits

5

Instructor

Guillermo Delgado-P

Quarter offered

Fall

LALS 147 Land and Peasants in the Americas

Explores current trends of rural societies in Latin America. Places emphasis on the human experience of the peasantry in the context of globalization and 21st-century free trade. Concentrates on specific cases of rural migrations throughout the Americas. Land and environmental issues, peasant women's experiences, rural society changes, the future of the Latin American peasantry, and the role of rural workers in post-industrial society are discussed. Knowledge of Spanish recommended.

Credits

5

Instructor

Guillermo Delgado-P

Quarter offered

Spring

LALS 162 U.S. Policy in the Americas

Studies U.S. policies toward Latin America and hemisphere-wide (primarily since WWII), including Cold War policies and interventions, U.S. response to the Cuban Revolution, the Alliance for Progress, counterinsurgency as the repsonse to revolutionary movements, the crisis in U.S. hegemony, NAFTA, and issues of U.S. policies for the post-Cold War era and the 21st century.

Credits

5

Instructor

Susanne Jonas

Quarter offered

Spring

LALS 166 Latino Families in Transition

Explores the complex nature of Latino families in the U.S., which like other American families are undergoing profound changes. Placing families within a historical context of post-1960s social transformations, such as feminism, immigration, and multiple-earner households, course examines how family members adapt, resist, and/or construct alternative visions and practices of family life. (Meets the methods requirement in Latin America and Latino studies.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): LALS 1.

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Winter

LALS 166L Latino Families in Transition Lab

Lab is associated with course 166, Latino Families in Transition. Students are instructed in the aesthetic and technical production of a short digital slide show that incorporates narration, music, sound effects, and still images.

Credits

2

Instructor

Patricia Zavella

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): LALS 166.

Quarter offered

Winter

LALS 173 Latin American Immigration to the U.S

Interdisciplinary examination of Latin American immigration to the U.S. Topics include history of U.S. as an immigrant nation, economic and political context for migration, immigration process/experience, U.S. immigration/refugee policies, anti-immigrant backlash today, issues facing Latino immigrant communities to the U.S., bi-national communities.

Credits

5

Instructor

Susanne Jonas

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Fall

LALS 174 Immigration, Asylum, and Citizenship in the U.S.

Examines the policies and politics of asylum in the United States, as they relate to Latin American/Latino/a refugee and migrant flows. Focuses on the forced migration and asylum claims of multiple social groupings (e.g., gender asylum seekers, unaccompanied minors) and how these communities confront the U.S. immigration, asylum, and citizenship regimes. (Formerly Immigration and Citizenship: A Global Perspective.)

Credits

5

General Education Code

PE-H

Quarter offered

Winter

LALS 177 Latinas in U.S. Cinema

Traces representations of Latinas in Hollywood cinema. Focuses on cinematic forms of representation (silent films to contemporary features). Beginning with U.S. expansion into the Southwest during 19th century and the early era of film, addresses how Latina sexualities and racialized gender are imagined, invented, explored, coded, and regulated in popular culture forms such as films.

Credits

5

Instructor

Rosa-Linda Fregoso

LALS 179D Mayan Society, Literature, and Thought

Intensive investigation of major aspects of the ethnography and literature of Mayan people since the Spanish Invasion. Concentration on forms of social life and meaning of discourses such as public performance in fiestas, joking, and tale-telling; and on individual biographic/autobiographic expression.

Credits

5

Instructor

Charles Wilson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): one of the following: LALS 80M, LALS 100B, LALS 142A, LALS 147, LALS 170, or HAVC 150A.

LALS 194D Hemispheric Dialogues: Bridging Latin American and Latina/o Studies

The rapid acceleration of North-South flows of people, resources, and ideas in the Americas has triggered a rethinking of both Latina/o studies and Latin American studies approaches. By bringing empirical materials and conceptual frameworks from Latin American studies to bear on Latina/o studies and vice versa, this advanced research seminar explores the interlocking social, cultural, economic, and political processes that connect Latin America and U.S. Latina/o communities.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): LALS 100A or LALS 100B. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior Latin American and Latino studies majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

LALS 194E Latino International Migration: Case Studies, Policy/Law, Transnational Practices

Seminar designed for students who already have basic understanding of migration and who want to pursue topic in greater depth and/or as preparation for a career related to immigration. Gives an understanding of various methodological approaches to study of migration, taken from different disciplinary fields.

Credits

5

Instructor

Susanne Jonas

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): LALS 173 or permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior Latin American and Latino studies majors, minors, combined, or double majors.

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring

LALS 194J Movimientos sociales contemporáneos

Taught in Spanish. Provides students with an opportunity to critically analyze various national/international impacts of Latino/Latin American social movements. Reviews pertinent social scientific literature and examines conclusions reached by their authors.

Credits

5

Instructor

Guillermo Delgado-P

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior Latin American and Latino studies majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

LALS 194K Drogas en la historia y la cultura de las Américas

Taught in Spanish. Studies the devastating effects drugs have on the Americas and the subcultures they (re)produce. Features critical readings on the impact of drugs in the Americas. Studies the origins of substances (tobacco, coca, marijuana), and looks at how they have been used through time before concentrating on the present.

Credits

5

Instructor

Guillermo Delgado-P

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior Latin American and Latino studies majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

LALS 194L Etnicidad, medio ambiente y desarrollo

Taught in Spanish. Interdisciplinary analysis of the interaction between ethnicity, tropical forests, and development policy in Latin America. Historical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives on natural resource rights and use, with a focus on Afro-Latin American and indigenous peoples.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior Latin American and Latino studies majors.

LALS 194N Las izquierdas en America Latina: ayer, hoy y mañana

Taught in Spanish. Focuses on legacies of Latin America's popular and revolutionary movements since the 1960s, current transformations, and 21st-century prospects. Major emphasis on contemporary leftist or left-leaning parties in power in the early 2000s, as well as new perspectives/re-evaluations/debates about past movements. Also includes cross-border strategies, movements, and alliances for social justice.

Credits

5

Instructor

Susanne Jonas

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior Latin American and Latino Studies majors, minors, combined or double majors.

Quarter offered

Fall

LALS 195A Social Justice Research and Writing

Combines a substantive emphasis on social justice issues pertaining to Latinos and Latin Americans with training in essential research and writing skills. Topics include: topic definition; bibliographical sources; interview techniques; fieldwork skills; disciplinary and interdisciplinary methods; and writing, revising, and editing. Course includes peer-to-peer learning and collective discussion of projects. Strongly recommended for students working on senior thesis, project, or expanded paper for the LALS senior exit requirement. (Formerly Seminar in Research Methods and Writing.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Susanne Jonas

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior LALS majors, minors, combined, or double majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

LALS 111 U.S. - Mexico Borderlands

Credits

LING 51 Phonetics

Practical training in hearing and recording sounds in a wide range of phonetic systems. Demonstrations and practice in phonetic analysis and description. Study in the techniques of using an informant.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

LING 80A Languages of the World

The origin and development of language, language families and their relations, language types, and language change. Special study of a small number of typologically contrasting languages. Focus on the study of language from anthropological and historical perspectives.

Credits

5

LING 80B Modern English Grammar

Elementary introduction to modern standard English grammar, both formal and informal, both written and spoken. Stresses the importance of linguistic evidence in understanding grammatical correctness; offers a demystification and critique of older traditional grammar in the light of recent research.

Credits

5

LING 80E Looking at Science Through Language

What is science? Anatomy of the scientific method, with linguistics as exemplification. Theories, evidence, falsification, scientific revolutions.

Credits

5

LING 80P Sounds of the World's Languages

Emphasizes the acquisition of four related skills: recognition, transcription, description, and production of speech sounds. Involves learning the highly useful phonetic alphabet, and acquiring an understanding of the articulatory and acoustic properties of speech sounds.

Credits

5

Instructor

Geoffrey Pullum

Repeatable for credit

Yes

LING 89 The Hungarian Language

Reviews the major aspects of Hungarian grammar concentrating on features that separate Hungarian from Indo-European languages.

Credits

1

LING 104 Phonetics Practicum

Supervised experience with acoustic speech analysis equipment. Students learn to make and interpret waveforms, spectrograms, pitch tracks, etc., based on live or recorded speech. Some reading required.

Credits

1

LING 106 Phonetics II

Grounding in the physics and physiology of speech sounds: production, acoustics, and perception. Analysis of wave forms and spectrograms. The nature of phonetic processes and the application of phonetic studies of phonological investigations.

Credits

5

LING 161 Natural Language Processing

An introduction to the computer simulation of the process of natural language understanding, one of the most significant new applications of linguistics. Concentrates on syntactic processing; parsing, representation of lexical information, and knowledge representation.

Credits

5

LING 163 Computational Morphology and Phonology

Introduction to computer simulation of phonological and morphological knowledge. Intended for linguistics and computer science majors having an interest in natural language analysis.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

LING 184 Structure of Irish

The phonology, morphology, and syntax of Irish, along with a consideration of its current sociopolitical situation. No knowledge of Irish required. Prerequisite(s): course 101, and course 111 or 112. Enrollment by permission of instructor.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

LING 190 Senior Research

Students produce a research paper or other significant project to satisfy the capstone requirement. Prerequisite(s): course 101, and either course 111 or 112. Concurrent enrollment in a specified upper-division course is required. Enrollment restricted to senior linguistics and language studies majors.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

LING 194 Senior Project

Deadline for submission of project proposal is one year in advance of proposed completion. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

LING 197 Squib Writing

Students write one squib (one to ten pages) per week except for weeks three and seven, when they write two squibs. A selection of the squibs is presented in class; one or two will be rewritten.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jorge Hankamer

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior linguistics and language studies majors with an advanced understanding of linguistics.

LING 201 History of Linguistics

The history and recent development of the science of linguistics, with primary emphasis on the development of generative grammar. Origin, development, and relationships of major theoretical frameworks. Pivotal controversies, arguments, and discoveries.

Credits

5

LING 213 Phonology C

Third part of a three quarter introduction to phonology. Topics of the sequence include fundamentals of acoustic phonetics; introduction to optimality theory; theories of syllabification, stress, and prosodic organization; prosodic morphology; advanced issues in faithfulness and correspondence; segmental and suprasegmental processes.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): LING 212. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students or by permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

LING 223 Syntax C

Continuation of Syntax B. The syntax of anaphora. Topics vary from year to year, and may include the following: coreference in antecedent-pronoun relations; reflexives and reciprocals; disjoint reference; bound-variable anaphora; ellipsis; semantic and pragmatic constraints on anaphora.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): LING 222. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students or by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

LING 233 Semantics C

Third and final course in the graduate introduction to semantics, focusing on questions at the border between semantics and pragmatics. Concerns include: modality, conditionals, non-declarative meaning, and context and context structure viewed from a dynamic perspective.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): LING 232. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

LING 257G Psycholinguistics and Linguistic Theory

Theory and methods in psycholinguistics, covering perception, production, and acquisition of language and linguistic structure. A hands-on, laboratory-style introduction to the topic, focusing on the relation between experimental findings and linguistic theory. Graduate students have separate evaluation criteria. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 157 or 257. Three-credit version of course 257. Does not require a final paper.

Credits

3

Instructor

Matthew Wagers

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

LING 265 Mathematical Foundations of Linguistics

A survey of the basic mathematical notions fundamental to the understanding of work in theoretical syntax, semantics, and phonology. Topics covered include basic set theory, formal logic, boolean algebra, graph theory, and formal language theory.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students or by permission of instructor.

LING 266 Proseminar in Computational and Mathematical Linguistics

In-depth investigation of some topic in computational or mathematical linguistics. Topics vary from year to year.

Credits

5

LING 269 Philosophy of Linguistics

Exploration of certain metaphysical and epistemological issues relating to the subject matter of linguistics.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

LIT 61A Theater and Theatricality

Survey of the relation of theater to cinema from 1905 to the 1960s. Theater-positive tendencies include Melies, Eisenstein, and German Expressionists. Examines cinematic resistance to theater in the opposition to sound film in France and the Soviet Union, Vertov's kino-eye, and Bresson's barring actors from film.

Credits

5

LIT 61B Introduction to Detective Fictions

A critical overview of detective fiction (and selected films) from Arthur Conan Doyle to contemporary and postmodern reappropriations. Lectures provide historical background and introduction to genre theory, psychoanalysis, and cultural critique.

Credits

5

Instructor

Earl Jackson

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 61D Introduction to Reading Drama

Introduction to the Western theatrical tradition through the study of dramatic form in social context.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mary-Kay Gamel

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

LIT 61E Introduction to Ethnic Literature

An introduction to the study of ethnic literatures, addressing issues of voice, political agency, and the construction of subjectivity across racial, ethnic, and cultural boundaries in the U.S. Topic: Slavery and the literary imagination.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

LIT 61G Introduction to Women's Literature

An introduction to women writers from a variety of cultures and historical eras.

Credits

5

Instructor

Pascale Gaitet

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 61I Introduction to the Italian Renaissance

Study of the Renaissance in Italy as concept and educational/artistic revolution with special attention to literary works and to the dialogue among the arts and sciences. Authors vary but may include Boccaccio, Petrarch, Machiavelli, Michelangelo.

Credits

5

LIT 61O Literature and Social Change in the Middle Ages

Critical examination of medieval texts that represent and comment upon social changes in Europe and Asia from the eleventh through the fourteenth centuries. Readings include such texts as Crusade narratives, the Inferno, Piers Plowman, and the Book of Margery Kemp.(Formerly course 66A.)

Credits

5

LIT 61Q Modern Irish Writing

Presents an interdisciplinary overview of writing in and about Ireland from the 1801 Act of Union to the 1980s, with special attention to historical events and conditions; colonial discourse and English nationalism; ethnographic and literary representation; gender, sexuality, and nationalism; and the problem of violence. (Formerly course 63A.)

Credits

5

LIT 61V Romantic Fiction

A study of novels, short stories, and fairy tales by authors from America, England, France, and Germany. Readings include works by Poe, Hawthorne, Mary Shelley, Goethe, Hoffman, Rousseau, and Merimee. (Formerly course 80M.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Loisa Nygaard

LIT 61Y Arthurian Romance

Reading of selected Arthurian romances in verse and prose from the French, German, and English traditions. (Formerly course 80H.)

Credits

5

LIT 64H Literature and History

Examines literature's relationship to the past and to the experience of history. Considers diverse modes of understanding the past: myth, tradition, chronicle, novel-writing, and scientific history.

Credits

5

LIT 80A Biblical Narratives

No book has so decisively influenced the development of the Western world as the Bible. Traces the Bible's influence on narrative, themes, and ideas in Western literature. Explores major Biblical stories and themes in a comparative context and traces their reappearance in Western literature and imaginative works.

Credits

5

LIT 80C The Ancient Novel in Cultural Perspective

A survey of ancient novels from the first to the fourth centuries B.C.E. as tales of adventure and romance. Discussions of the meaning of romance, the history of the erotic novel, the history of texts, ancient sexuality, ancient literary production, and the contemporary romance novel.

Credits

5

LIT 80G Studies In Modernism

This introductory course explores literature and culture of the first half of the 20th century. Course materials may include literary texts, films, philosophy, visual arts, and critical essays.

Credits

5

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

LIT 80J Modern Medievalisms

Examines the ideological functions of the representation of the Middle Ages in literature and film from the 19th century to the present, with special attention to issues of cultural contact, the formation of nationalisms, and the uses of history and fiction.

Credits

5

LIT 80P Topics in Latin American Culture

Through films, literary texts, historical, sociological, and anthropological writings, explores topics pertaining to Latin American culture and society. Course topic changes; please see the Schedule of Classes for current topic.

Credits

5

Instructor

Lourde Martinez-Echazabal

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 80R Modern Italian Literature: From Realism to Myth

An introduction to modern Italian literature from the 19th century to the present, with emphasis on social, political, and gender issues, and the development of narrative prose from realism to myth.

Credits

5

LIT 80S Aristotle's Poetics

Close reading and analysis of Aristotle's Poetics,with special attention to the subsequent fate and influence of the notions advanced in the book.

Credits

5

Instructor

Wlad Godzich

LIT 109A Readings in Theory

A follow-up to Literature 101, consists of readings and discussion of theoretical texts.

Credits

2

LIT 109X Marxist Literary Criticism

Considers the tradition of literary criticism with the tradition of Marxist thinking about society and culture with particular attention to some classic texts in the tradition.

Credits

3

LIT 109Z Twenty-First Century Novels

Examines novels from around the world published since 2000. Class discussion focuses on the novel form and its condition at the beginning of the new millennium.

Credits

3

Instructor

Wlad Godzich

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 110E Masterpieces of German Literature

Introduction to some of the major works by authors from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Emphasis on close analysis of the texts, but also considers the special role literature has played in German cultural life, and the relationship between the works covered and the dominant intellectual and social movements of the times. Authors include Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, Mann, and Kafka. Critical approach designations: Canons, Geographies.

Credits

5

LIT 111A Aphra Behn

Focus is on the corpus of the 17th-century English woman writer Aphra Behn. Examines the role of genres, culture, literary history, colonialism, gender, and the theater in the genesis of Behn's writing career. Critical approach designations: Canons, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 111C John Milton

Selected poetry and prose. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

H Leicester

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 112B Calvino

Advanced introduction to an author whose influence on post-war fiction is acknowledged by writers in Latin America, the United States, Europe, and beyond. Readings include Marcovaldo, Italian Folk Tales, Baron in the Trees, Cosmicomics, Six Memos for the Next Millennium. Critical approach designations: Canons, Geographies.

Credits

5

LIT 112D Emily Dickinson

Focuses on Emily Dickinson's letters and poems with emphasis on genre, audience, art and the erotic, and on current textual editing issues. Critical approach designations: Canons, Genres. Distribution requirement: Poetry.

Credits

5

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 112E Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan as Poet: From Folk Hero to Electric Messiah. Focuses primarily on the poetry and poetics of Dylan's by now substantial canon of works—early, middle, and late. Stresses poetic syntax, various lyric genres, surrealist imagery, and narrative tactics used, as well as the more socially expansive dynamics of how Dylan forged his prophetic/visionary imagination. Critical approach designations: Canons, Media. Distribution requirement: Poetry.

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Wilson

LIT 112F Ralph Waldo Emerson and the Poetics of American Capitalism

Through close readings of essays, poems, and critical studies, examines how the vision of cultural poetics, strong selfhood, and will to national sublimity of Emerson represents the creative-destructive dynamics of American capitalism. Manifest destiny, imperial subjectivity, class, and globalization are issues. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Poetry.

Credits

5

LIT 112H James Joyce

Study of fiction of James Joyce, emphasizing narrative innovations, cultural conflicts, and crisis of nationalism in the early 20th century. Topic: Ulysses. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 112J Federico García Lorca and Modern Spanish Poetry

Concentrates on poetry and drama of García Lorca but also includes works by Nobel Laureate in Literature Vicente Aleixandre, and other important poets of 20th-century Spain. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Poetry.

Credits

5

LIT 112L John Steinbeck

A critical study of John Steinbeck's novels and short fiction, with close attention to both formal and thematic elements in the author's work. Critical approach designations: Canons, Geographies.

Credits

5

LIT 112N Virginia Woolf

Students read The Voyage Out, Orlando, To the Lighthouse, The Waves, and Between the Acts, plus selections from The Collected Letters. The foci of the course are critical, biographical, and historical. Concerns are also with expressions of feminism present in Woolf's work, and the importance of a female community in providing a framework for the development of her vision. Critical approach designations: Canons, Genres.

Credits

5

LIT 114B <I>Don Quixote de la Mancha</I>

A close study of Books I and II of the Cervantes novel together with an examination of some of the criticism on this work written in English throughout the centuries. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jorge Aladro Font

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 115A Homer and Sappho

Close reading of the Iliad, Odyssey, and fragments of Sappho and other lyric poets of the Archaic Age. Critical approach designations: Canons, Genres. Distribution requirement: Poetry, Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

John Lynch

LIT 115B Women Modernists: Virginia Woolf and Gertrude Stein

Focuses on two innovative modernist writers, Virginia Woolf and Gertrude Stein, in their artistic, cultural, and historical contexts. Critical approach designations: Canons, Power and Subjectivities.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tyrus Miller

LIT 116A Ancient Philosophy

A close reading of selected dialogues of Plato. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 116D Power, Pleasure, and Danger in Ancient Athens

Works by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Thucydides, and Plato will be read as products of their own time and culture, as sources of Western artistic, intellectual, and moral traditions, and as works still meaningful today. Topics include heroism, relationships between thought and action, conflicts between the individual and society, the nature of divinity and its relationship to human beings. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jennifer Lynn

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 116E Love and Madness in Medieval Literature

A study of the development of the courtly love tradition in medieval Italy and France, with close attention to the construction of gender and authorship, and to the interconnections between Eros, madness, and death. Works include troubadour poetry, the romances of Chretien de Troyes, tales of Marie de France, Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Poetry, Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 118B Translation, Midrash, Interpretation

Focuses on theory and practice of translation, and on Midrash, their interrelation and the ways in which they inflect our understanding of literary and cultural interpretation. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Murray Baumgarten

LIT 118C Jewish Mysticism

Overview of literature of Jewish mysticism and Kabbalah from antiquity to the present. Focuses on primary texts including the Bible, Dead Sea Scrolls, Talmud, Midrash, Medieval/Spanish Kabbalah, Kabbalah of Safed, Sabbatianism, Hasidism, and contemporary authors. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Global, Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Daniel Selden

LIT 118D Performing Texts

Wide-angled exploration of the cultural worlds connected with Jewish liturgy across the diaspora. Offers an anthropological approach to the connections between written text and oral cultures in Judaism: classical and contemporary texts, poetry, music, architecture, and synagogue life. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 120G Modern British Poetry

A survey of selected British poets from the late 19th century through the present. Critical approach designations: Genres, Geographies. Distribution requirement: Poetry.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tyrus Miller

General Education Code

TA

LIT 120I Spanish American Poetry

A study of the major periods in Spanish American poetry from the movement known as modernismo to the present. Concentrates on those authors who have changed the course of poetry by introducing new forms and themes in the constitution of a new poetics. Poets studied include Darío, Storni, Hidobro, Vallejo, Neruda, Mistral, Paz, Parra, Castellanos, Cardenal, Orozco, Ferré, Pacheco, and Lihn. Critical approach designations: Genres, Geographies. Distribution requirement: Global, Poetry.

Credits

5

LIT 121A The Heroic Epic

A survey and analysis of primary epic: Gilgamesh, the Iliad, the Odyssey, and Exodus. Critical approach designations: Canons, Genres. Distribution requirement: Poetry, Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Thomas Walsh

LIT 121B Lyric Traditions in Comparative Perspective

Close reading of Greek and Roman lyric poems, including major works by Sappho, Catullus, Pindar, and Horace. Special attention to poetics and aesthetics; to social, political, and economic contexts; to the influence of Greek and Roman lyric on later literatures; and to independent parallels seen in lyric forms from non-Western cultures. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories. Distribution requirement: Poetry, Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 121C Orphic Poetry

Examines varying interpretations, appropriations, and exploitations of the Orphic myth in its threefold manifestation as harmony, descent, and dismemberment. Topics include the regeneration of language, the poet as priest, and the re-sacralization of an increasingly secularized world. Critical approach designations: Canons, Genres. Distribution requirement: Poetry, Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 121E The Beloved in Medieval Poetry

The figure of the Beloved is a medieval invention. Course traces its development from the Mozarabic Jarchas to Petrarch, and includes Provençal Troubadours, German Minnesaenger, French Trouveres, the Spanish Libro de Buen Amor, and The Romance of the Rose. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories. Distribution requirement: Poetry, Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Wlad Godzich

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 121F Medieval French Romance

Arthurian, realist and allegorical romances of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries studied in their social and historical context. In English translation.Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Sharon Kinoshita

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 121I Poetry

A comparative examination of poetry in the modern world, and of poetic responses to social change and crisis. Critical approach designations: Genres, Geographies. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

LIT 123A Autobiography: The Augustinian Tradition

Close reading of five genetically linked self-portraits that have determined the dominant tradition of self-representation in the West: Augustine, Dante, Petrarch, Montaigne, Rousseau. Topics for discussion: the concept of identity, narrative strategies for presentation of the self, the interplay between discursive operations (language, reading, writing) and lived experience, the policing of the body, and sexual difference as a basis for self-determination. Critical approach designations: Canons, Genres. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 123B The Challenge of Testimonio

Explores three related problematics (authority and literature, writing and subjectivity, historical and literary discourses of memory) through the genealogical study of a genre: the testimonial narrative in Latin America. Colonial, republican, and contemporary texts are studied. Critical approach designations: Genres, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

LIT 124B The Contemporary Latin American Short Story

From fantasy to social reality, from travel diary to poetic prose, the readings provide an introduction to the main currents in Latin American short fiction. Texts by some of the most famous writers and by very recent ones belonging to the latest promotions. Critical approach designations: Genres, Geographies. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

LIT 125E Modern Italian Novel

Surveys Italian novels of the 19th and 20th centuries. Critical approach designations: Canons, Geographies.

Credits

5

Instructor

Deanna Shemek

LIT 125F The New Latin American Novel

Examination of contemporary narrative from Latin America. Critical approach designations: Genres, Geographies. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

LIT 125G The Classic Russian Novel

Detailed literary analysis of novels by Gogol, Goncharov, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Pasternak. Focus upon aesthetic devices of texts, as well as upon ethical and philosophical issues that inform them. Critical approach designations: Genres, Geographies. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

LIT 126B Detective Fiction

Representative works of 19th- and 20th-century detective fiction, including works by Poe, Conan Doyle, Christie, Sayers, Hammett, Chandler, P.D. James, Paretsky, and others. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories.

Credits

5

Instructor

John Jordan

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 126C Literature of the Fantastic

An analysis of the structure and effects of the peculiar narrative genre called le Fantastique through a comparative study of certain 19th- and 20th-century short fictions. Readings in Balzac, Poe, James, Nerval, Blanchot, and Freud. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories.

Credits

5

LIT 126D Travels in Hyper-Reality: 20th-Century Italian Fiction

Modern Italian fiction, emphasizing the non-realist traditions of fantasy and the fantastic. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories.

Credits

5

LIT 126E The Historical Novel

Traces major developments in the historical novel, looking at how this popular genre has taken up a series of different forms, concerns, and questions about history and the different senses of historicity that fiction can express. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories.

Credits

5

LIT 127A American Prose: Modern and Contemporary Non-Fiction

Explores the strands and streams of creative non-fiction in postwar American literature. Topics range from the non-fiction novel and the New Journalism, to experiments in autobiography, media, art, and cultural criticism that make up the world of publishing today.Critical approach designations: Genres, Geographies.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 127B French Philosophical Writers

Analysis of leading figures, periods, and problems in French philosophy. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 127C Satire

An introduction to satire as both an individual genre with a unique literary history, and as a discursive technique present in other literary genres. Students will investigate a range of satiric works from the classical, early modern, and modern periods. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

LIT 130C Magic Divination Astrology

Cross-cultural study of magic, divination, and astronomical prognostication as rituals of power that both express and negotiate differences in gender, race, ethnicity, and class. Literature 101 or previous experience with critical theory strongly recommended. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Daniel Selden

Repeatable for credit

Yes

LIT 132B Modern Italian Literature in Translation

Readings in Italian literature and culture ranging from Romanticism to the post-modern. Emphasis on Italy's relation to modernity in terms of artistic innovation; politics and social life; family and gender relations; regional, national, and international identities. Topics vary from year to year. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories.

Credits

5

LIT 132C Italian Postmodern Fiction

Exploration of issues in postmodern writing through readings of several substantial Italian texts, in translation. Authors include Gadda, Calvino, Morante, and Eco. Focus is on questions of interpretation, textuality, and authority. Critical approach designations: Canons, Geographies.

Credits

5

LIT 133A Classical Japanese Literature in Translation

A survey of major works in classical Japanese novels and poetry of ancient and medieval times. Reading includes such works as The Ten Thousand Leaves, The Tale of Genji, The Pillow Book, The Tale of Heike, Twenty Plays of the Noh Theater. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories. Distribution requirement: Global, Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 133B Japanese Poetry and Poetics

Surveys poetry and poetic theories in the contexts of literary and intellectual history from the eighth century to the 1970s, with emphasis on the dynamics of tradition and innovation. Critical approach designations: Genres, Geographies. Distribution requirement: Poetry, Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 133C Modern Japanese Novel

Important 20th-century novels and short stories in English translation including works by Soseki, Kawabata, Mishima, Oe, and significant women authors. Discussion of literary themes in the context of changing Japanese society and thought. Japanese language skills not required. Critical approach designations: Genres, Geographies. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

LIT 134B Twentieth-Century Francophone Literatures of Africa and the Caribbean in Translation

Introduction to 20th-century Francophone literatures through the study of selected texts from Africa and the Caribbean. Particular emphasis is placed on the social, cultural, historical, and intellectual contexts within which these works can be situated. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

LIT 135B Studies in South African Literature

A survey of writing from South Africa since 1948, focusing on social and political themes. Authors include Paton, Gordimer, Mphahlele, Fugard, Ndebele, Head, Brutus, Coetzee, and others. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

Instructor

John Jordan

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 135C Race Relations: The U.S., South Africa in the Late 19th Century

Focuses on the more prominent theories of biological determinism and on the responses to their theories. In the case of America: the debate over integration versus segregation and on the Pan African movement. In the case of South Africa: the intertwined issues of the institutionalization of segregation and the growth of Afrikaner nationalism. Offered in alternate academic years. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

LIT 135D Slavery, Race, and Nation in the Americas

Compares literatures and histories of slavery, abolitionism, and nationalism in 19th-century Cuba and the U.S. Readings include slave narratives by Juan Francisco Manzano (Cuba) and Harriet Jacobs (U.S.) and antislavery novels by black nationalist Martin Delany, Cuban nationalist Cirilio Villaverde, and sentimental reformers Harriet Beecher Stowe and Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

LIT 136A American Writers Abroad

Focuses on American modernist expatriate writers and travelers including Gertrude Stein, Henry Miller, Djuna Barnes, Paul and Jane Bowles, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes, John Reed, and H.D. (Hilda Doolittle). Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tyrus Miller

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 136C Community and Escape

Examination of 20th-century writers' response to 19th- and 20th-century canonical models of community and escape, particularly in relationship to evolving ideas of wilderness and utopian community. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories.

Credits

5

LIT 137B The San Francisco Renaissance: Poetry and Community

Examines poetic regionalism, with particular attention to theories and practices coming out of the San Francisco Bay Area from 1945–65: opposition to war, alternative practices of publishing communities, and artistic collaborations and inter-related artistic and poetic communities.Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories. Distribution requirement: Poetry.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

LIT 140A Gnosticism, Neoplatonism, and Kabbalah

A study of Gnosticism and Neoplatonism as they emerge out of Near Eastern traditions (Greek, Egyptian, Semitic, Iranian), and their ultimate convergence in Judaism as the teaching and practice of Kabbalah. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories. Distribution requirement: Global, Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 140B Archaeology of Power

Historical study of the concept of power as institutionalized in Indo-European society, elaborated in the ancient world, and bequeathed to the nation-states (Eastern and Western) of today. Focus is on the logic and ideas implicit in basic political, military, economic, and social structures. Readings in history, anthropology, linguistics, religion, political science, and myth. Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750. Taught in conjunction with course 210.

Credits

5

LIT 144B English Renaissance Literature

Sampling of early modern English prose, verse, and drama. Topic: Jews, Race, and Renaissance England. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Margo Hendricks

LIT 144C Italian Renaissance

Study of Renaissance in Italy as concept and educational/artistic revolution, with special attention to literary works and to dialogue among the arts and sciences. Authors vary but may include Boccaccio, Petrarch, Machiavelli, and Michelangelo. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Deanna Shemek

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 144D Spanish Masterpieces of the Golden Age

Works from various genres including the Poem of the Cid, the Celestina, and Lazarillo de Tormes. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 144E Italian Renaissance: How to Do It

Examines the proliferation of advice literature in early modern Europe as indication of the widespread impression that the world was undergoing unprecedented change. Readings include advice books for state rulers (Machiavelli), instructions for educating daughters (Vives), books on manners (Della Casa), and exercises for spiritual discipline (Ignatius of Loyola). Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 144F The Seventeenth Century

Discussion of selected major works of 17th-century European literature in their historical and philosophical context. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Wlad Godzich

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 145B The 18th Century: Sense and Sensuality

A consideration of the complex attitudes of 18th-century English society toward the individual family structure, sexuality, gender, and class. Historical texts are read along with drama, fiction, and nonfiction prose. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories.

Credits

5

LIT 146E Eighteenth Century to the Present

Major works of European fiction in their social, cultural, and intellectual contexts. Works are read in translation. Course topic changes; please see the Schedule of Classes for current topic. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 147B Nineteenth-Century Russian Fiction in Translation

Masterpieces of poetry and prose from the Golden Age of Russian literature, from Pushkin to Chekhov. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 148A Twentieth-Century British Literature

Extensive study of literary productions of 20th-century Britain. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories.

Credits

5

Instructor

Sherri Helvie

LIT 148B The Harlem Renaissance

Examination of major writings of the Harlem Renaissance, with attention to cultural and historical background. Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivies. Distribution requirement: Poetry.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nathaniel Mackey

LIT 148C American Literature: 1900 to WWII

Surveys American literature in and around the climate of modernism. Beginning with texts written at the turn of the century, course ranges widely through the early to mid-20th century. Special attention will be given to works produced before and between World Wars, as well as to the various artistic, social and international movements characterizing that period. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories.

Credits

5

Instructor

Louis Chude-Sokei

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 148D The Lawrence Myth: D.H. and T.E. Lawrence

Considers the writing and mythos of D. H. Lawrence and T. E. Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia) in the culture of Great Britain between 1910 and 1930. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tyrus Miller

LIT 148E Russian Literature in Revolution

Survey of 20th-century Soviet literature, from the revolution to the death of Stalin. Readings include modernist and avant-garde texts of the 1920s and socialist realism. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

LIT 148F Literature and Culture of the American Left

Survey of literature, music, and film associated with leftist social movements and culture. Situates literary and cultural representations in an historical context. Course topic changes; please see the Class Search for the current topic. Critical approach designations: Histories, Media.

Credits

5

Instructor

Christine Hong

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 148G Nazism and Literature

Study of various literary reactions to Nazism. Examines cultural conditions at the time the movement arose, authors who supported it, authors who opposed it, and post-war writers who have attempted to deal with the Nazi past. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories.

Credits

5

LIT 148H Post-War English Novel

Survey of major works of post-WWII British fiction. Emphasis on postmodernism and experimental fiction, questions of social and sexual identity, utopia and dystopia, and problems of historical representation in fiction. Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivities.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tyrus Miller

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 150A Literacy and the Coming of the Book

What difference in world history do books make? Topics in the history of literary institutions, including the production, distribution, and reception of printed works. The transition from manuscript to print. The history of reading. The end of the book? Critical approach designations: History, Media. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jody Greene

LIT 150B Writing and Authority in the Pre-Capitalist World

How writing functions before the emergence of the nation, class, capitalist relations, the individual, and printing. Theories of world history/periodization; the social and political character of literacy; technologies of writing. Focus is on early imperial China and post-Carolingian Europe. Critical approach designations: Histories, Media. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 150C Theory and Practice of Literary Translation

Provides theoretical background and practical experience in the translation into English of literary works of poetry and prose originally written in another language. A thorough knowledge of at least one foreign language is required. Critical approach designations: Genres, Media.

Credits

5

LIT 151A Women and Comedy

Readings in Aristophanes, Plautus, Hroswitha, Shakespeare, and various women playwrights. Women as agents of social change on the stage are discussed in historical and theoretical contexts. Critical approach designations: Media, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 151C Studies in Early Modern Theater

Examines early modern theories of theatricality, cultural, and social values. Critical approach designations: Histories, Media. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 151D Studies in the Italian Theater: Early Modern Comedy

The courtly, popular, and populist traditions in Renaissance comedy from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries. Emphasis is placed on the way in which particular social and historical factors conditioned the forms of dramatic representation which flourished during the Renaissance. Among authors to be studied are Aretino, Machiavelli, Poliziano, and examples of the commedia dell'arte. Critical approach designations: Genres, Media. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 151E Spanish Golden Age Theater

Analyzes theater during the Golden Age (16th and 17th centuries) of Spanish literature, when the theater was a democratic meeting point and a social barometer. The popularity of playwrights such as Lope de Vega and Calderón de la Barca is comparable to the stars of Hollywood of today. Critical approach designations: Genres, Media. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jorge Aladro Font

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 151F Drama under the Sun King

Masterpieces of French classical theater from the reign of Louis XIV, with particular attention to the social, cultural, and political context of their production: Corneille, Moliere, Racine. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Media. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 151H Introduction to American Drama

Examines drama in the United States. Issues such as race, sexuality, gender, class, and the art of drama are explored.Critical approach designations: Media, Power and Subjectivities.

Credits

5

Instructor

Margo Hendricks

Repeatable for credit

Yes

LIT 151I Twentieth-Century British Drama

Studies in British dramatists, including Shaw, Eliot, Beckett, Osborne, Pinter, Stoppard, Bond, Orton, and Churchill. Critical approach designations: Genres, Media.

Credits

5

LIT 151J Modern Italian Theater: The Spectacle of Reason and Madness

Authors include Nobel Prize winners Luigi Pirandello (1934) and Dario Fo (1997). Topics: relation of modern theater's innovative forms to medieval street performance and early modern commedia dell'arte, theme of the inversion of reason and madness as instrument of social critique, modern dramatic theory. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Media.

Credits

5

LIT 154A Avant-Gardes

Survey of major avant-garde movements relating literature and other arts. Movements considered include cubism, futurism, expressionism, vorticism, surrealism, Black Mountain, and minimalism. Critical approach designations: Histories, Media.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tyrus Miller

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 155B British Film

Films are considered both as texts in their own right and as expressions and contributions to larger social discourses around the specific tensions of British society and culture. Course topic changes; see the Class Critical approach designations: Histories, Media.

Credits

5

Instructor

H Leicester

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 155F Post-Colonial Cinema

Explores how the colonial encounter, anti-colonial struggles, neo-colonial impositions, and postcoloniality as an evolving construct have been registered in (predominantly fictional) films from the U.S., Europe, South America, Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. Critical approach designations: Media, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

LIT 155G Films on the Border

Surveys a range of cinematic representations of the U.S.-Mexico border region from Hollywood, independent, Chicano/Latino, Mexican, and local sources. Studies the border in both concrete and symbolic registers. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Media. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

Instructor

Julianne Burton-Carvajal

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 155I Violence in Contemporary American Film

A survey of recent American feature films in which graphic depiction of physical violence is an important element. Primary emphasis on analysis of formal, textual, and generic elements; some attention is paid to psychological, sociopolitical, and ideological contexts and implications of representing violence. Critical approach designations: Genres, Media.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mary-Kay Gamel

LIT 155K Howard Hawks

Howard Hawks: nearly complete survey of a major auteur of the classic Hollywood cinema plus close reading of major works from Scarface to the Rio trilogy, and influence on later films. Critical approach designations: Genres, Media.

Credits

5

LIT 157B The Comedy of Sex on Stage and Screen

Surveys the theory and practice of comedy in several contexts and media including stage, film, and television, with special attention to questions of gender and sexuality. Texts include Aristophanes, Plautus, Shakespeare, Moliere, Orton, Chaplin, Seinfeld, Freud, Bakhtin. Critical approach designations: Genres, Media. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mary-Kay Gamel

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 157D Texts and Bodies: Representation of Desire in Four Texts, Three Media

1. Psychoanalysis: Barthes and Lacan; 2. Chaucer and fabliau: The Miller's Tale; 3. Verdian opera; 4. Films of John Carpenter. Critical approach designations: Genres, Media.

Credits

5

LIT 158A Introduction to Music Drama

Introduction to opera from Mozart to Berg. Close analysis of text setting, musical form, dramaturgy, and performance (singing/acting), with particular attention to politics, gender, subject-formation, and opera's constitutive role in the rise, as well as critique, of modern bourgeois culture. No previous training in music theory required, although some affinity for classical music desirable. Critical approach designations: Genres, Media.

Credits

5

Instructor

Daniel Selden

LIT 158B Opera and Film

Interactions between the media of opera and film from the silent era to contemporary movies and television. Special attention will be paid to the flowering of opera films in the eighties, from Losey's Don Giovanni to Zefferelli's Otello, and to Peter Sellar's postmodern reworkings of Mozart for television. Critical approach designations: Genres, Media.

Credits

5

LIT 159A Beyond Identity

Recent scholarly attention has focused on identity construction among individuals, collectivities, and even products (branding). This seminar focuses on getting one's bearing in a changing organization of knowledge and on determining one's place within it. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories.

Credits

5

Instructor

Wlad Godzich

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 160A Inventing the Barbarian

Texts about encounters with unknown and/or foreign cultures (designated by the Greek term barbarian) provide the basis for historicizing the emergence of Western colonialism, racism, and sexism. Homer, Odyssey; Hippocrates, Airs, Waters, Places; Euripides Bacchae; documents relating to the discovery of the New World. Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 160B Monsters, Barbarians, and Women: Topics in Ancient Ethnography

Focus is on the construction of race and gender in ancient Greek culture. Literary, historical, philosophical, dramatic, and medical texts (Homer, Hesiod, Herodotus, Euripides, Hippocrates, Plato, Aristotle) as well as visual media (vase painting, sculpture) are studied. Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jennifer Lynn

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 160D Race, Sex, and Nation in U.S. Popular Culture

Theory and practice of popular culture in the U.S. We will address how popular culture forms have historically adapted racial and sexual stereotypes and formulas in relation to nationalism, whether to challenge or to confirm the nation. Critical approach designations: Media, Power and Subjectivities.

Credits

5

LIT 160H Narratives of Resistance

Selections from writers from around the world, whose common theme is resistance to domination. In most cases, the domination is multiple and complex, involving gender oppression, and racial and colonial domination. Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

LIT 161C Afro-Asian Cultural Production

Charts, through examination of literature, film, and historical documents, the legacy of Afro-Asian encounters within the Americas and on the global stage with a focus on comparative racialization, slavery, and colonialism, Third World liberation, and inter-ethnic tensions. Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

Instructor

Christine Hong

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 164E Jews in Italy

Examines major Jewish writers in Italy. Course materials include films, poetry, cultural documents. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Power and Subjectivities.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

LIT 164F Israeli Literature

An introduction to Hebrew literature since the 1940s, and to Israeli culture and history of this period. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

Instructor

Moshe Ron

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 164I Modernity as Jewish Challenge and Catastrophe: The American Experience

Examines modernity as Jewish challenge and catastrophe, and focuses on the American experience. Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivities.

Credits

5

Instructor

Bruce Thompson

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 164K Jewish Comedy

Examines literary, theatrical, cinematic, and televised representations of Jewish culture, focusing on the ways in which Jews have negotiated the transition to modernity via comedy and humor. Critical approach designations: Media, Power and Subjectivities.

Credits

5

Instructor

Bruce Thompson

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 166D Feminist Theory in Historical Perspective

A study of the various strands of contemporary feminist thought and scholarship, and an investigation of the usefulness of feminist insights for the analysis of a particular culture and its texts. Readings in Middle English and in translation. Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 166F French Women Writers

Offers an introduction to the work and thought of three 20th-century French women writers: Simone de Beauvoir, Marguerite Duras, and Monique Wittig. Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivities.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 166G Italian Women Writers

Examination of literary texts and feminist works of Italian women writers; special attention to the relationship between women's writing, constructions of authorship and gender, and the historical-cultural context. While most of the works are from the 20th century, some earlier writings are also explored. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Power and Subjectivities.

Credits

5

LIT 166H Latin American Women Writers

Explores literary production by women in relation to social movements and historical events. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

Instructor

Lourde Martinez-Echazabal

LIT 166I Women in Russian Literature

Survey of women's writing and representations of women in Russian and Slavic literature from the medieval folk tale through the contemporary period. Topics include Baba Yaga tales, woman as subject in 19th-century literature, Soviet memoir literature, and evolution of the persona of the female author. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Global.

Credits

5

Instructor

William Nickell

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 166J Women Modernists

Readings of innovative fiction, poetry, and essays by women writers from 1900-1950. We will discuss issues of gender and sexuality as they affect literary theme and form, female literary collaboration and lesbian salons, and the critical framing of women's writings by feminism and modernism. Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivities.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tyrus Miller

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 167A The Body in Antiquity

Focuses on the political, historical, and ontological construction of the body in ancient Greek culture. Literary, historical, philosophical, and medical texts (Homer, Herodotus, Plato, Aristotle, Hippocrates) as well as visual media (vase painting, sculpture) are studied. Critical approach designations: Media, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 167D Topics in Medical Humanities

Medical humanities is an interdisciplinary field of humanities (literature, philosophy, ethics, history, and religion) concerned with its application to medical education and practice. The humanities provide insight into the human condition, suffering, personhood, and our responsibility to each other; and offer an historical perspective on medical science. Course helps prepare students for the reading comprehension and writing parts of the MCAT. Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivities. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Literature 80K.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

HISC 145E

Instructor

Wlad Godzich

LIT 179D Special Projects in Creative Writing

Focuses on the development of extended creative writing projects, and may be used by students to prepare for the creative writing senior.

Credits

3

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 182B Le seizi&eacute;me si&eacute;clee

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in French required. Literature and history of early modern (16th, 17th, or 18th century) France. May include poetry, prose, and drama. Topics include the study of identity and difference in premodernity, gender, sexuality, and travel narratives. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750. (Formerly Early Modern France.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Carla Freccero

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 182C Littérature moderne

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in French required. Study of 19th- and 20th-century literary innovation and/or representations of sociohistorical events. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories. (Formerly Introduction to Modernity.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Richard Terdiman

Repeatable for credit

Yes

LIT 182D Récit et fiction

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in French required. Course topic changes; see the Class Search for current topic. Critical approach designations: Genres, Geographies. (Formerly Studies in Narrative.)

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 182G Litt&eacute;rature et les arts

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in French required. Literary texts studied in the context of the development of other arts (visual, cinematic, musical, architectural) in the same historical period. Consideration of the relation between the written text and visual or acoustical images. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Critical approach designations: Histories, Media. (Formerly Literature and the Arts.)

Credits

5

LIT 183C Medieval German Literature

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in German required. An introduction to the language and literature of the Middle High German period (circa 1200). The material studied will include selections from the great epics (including Das Nibelungenlied) and from the Minnesang poets (including Walther von der Volgelweide). Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 183E German Lyric Poetry

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in German required. A look at carefully selected poems by major German poets from 1730 to 1900. Authors read include Goethe, Hölderlin, Eichendorff, Heine, Mörike, Hofmannsthal, and Rilke. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories, Media. Distribution requirement: Poetry.

Credits

5

LIT 183I German Cinema: History, Culture, and Society

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in German required. Focus is on those formal, narrative, and aesthetic characteristics of distinguishing German cinema throughout its development from mainstream film. Deals with Germany's silent Weimar and expressionist films; with Weimar film and its construction of the social imaginary; with new German cinema's struggle with history and the postmodern. Critical approach designations: Histories, Media.

Credits

5

LIT 183J German Women Writers

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in German required. A study of women writing in German as well as of the social and political contexts in which they wrote. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Power and Subjectivities.

Credits

5

LIT 183L German Travelers

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in German required. A study of travel narratives, both fictional and autobiographical, focusing on how German-speaking travelers have responded to foreign cultures and often gained, through travel, new perspectives of their own. Authors include Goethe, Heine, Eichendorff, Hesse, and Wolf. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories.

Credits

5

LIT 183O German Identity

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in German required. Pursues the development of German identity from the Middle Ages to the present and approaches this issue from an interdisciplinary perspective, using literary, anthropological, historical and political texts. What is German identity after a 40-year history of division and a reunification process that continues? Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivities.

Credits

5

LIT 183Q German Cultural Criticism: The Poetics of Resistance

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in German required. Referring to the Debates on Realism of the 1930s, considers a variety of counter-textual forms: the fantastic, the grotesque, melodrama, the avant-garde, dada. Critical approach designations: Histories, Power and Subjectivities.

Credits

5

LIT 183R Goethe

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in German required. Close study of the works of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories.

Credits

5

LIT 183S Kafka

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in German required. An intensive study of the works of Franz Kafka, with close readings in particular of the aphorisms and shorter texts, and with reference to the literary, social, and historical context in which Kafka's work emerged. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories.

Credits

5

LIT 183T Kleist, Hoffmann, and Kafka

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in German required. Study of the three leading figures among German writers of bizarre and fantastic stories. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories.

Credits

5

LIT 183U Thomas Mann

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in German required. An intensive study of the works of Thomas Mann, with particular attention given to his portrayal of pre-fascist and fascist European culture. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories.

Credits

5

LIT 185A Italian Literary Genres

Close readings of a small number of texts representing major authors, periods, and genres (lyric, dramatic, narrative) of Italian literature. Intensive practice in spoken and written Italian. Critical approach designations: Canons, Genres.

Credits

5

Instructor

Deanna Shemek

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 185C Early Modern Comedy

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Italian required. The courtly, popular, and populist traditions in Renaissance comedy from the fourteenth- through the seventeenth-centuries. Emphasis is placed on the way in which particular social and historical factors conditioned the forms of dramatic representation which flourished during the Renaissance. Among authors to be studied are Aretino, Machiavelli, Poliziano, and examples of the commedia dell'arte. Critical approach designations: Media, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirements: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 185D Italian Renaissance Survey

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Italian required. Survey of the chief writers in Florence and Ferrara at the turn of the 15th century and the early 16th century. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories. Distribution requirements: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 185E Romanticism

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Italian required. A close thematic and stylistic study of the poetics of romanticism in Italy. Readings include the epistolary novel and lyrics of Ugo Foscolo and the Canti of Giacomo Leopardi, as well as selections from his prose dialogues, Le Operette Morali. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories. Distribution requirements: Poetry.

Credits

5

LIT 185F Italian Autobiography

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Italian required. Examines various critical perspectives on the writing of autobiography in Italy, including issues of gender; the construction of the self; theories of representation and narratology; cultural and political context. Principal readings in Italian: Dante, Cellini, Renaissance female poets, Alfieri, Pellico, Aleramo, Ginzburg, Levi. Selected readings from St. Augustine and Rousseau. Critical approach designations: Genres, Power and Subjectivities.

Credits

5

LIT 185G Modern Drama

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Italian required. Major currents in the 20th-century Italian theater, from D'Annunzio to the contemporary avant-garde. The dramatic texts are approached from a variety of different perspectives: semiotic, anthropological, and sociological. The differentiation between the literary and the theatrical codes is a major focus. Among authors studied are D'Annunzio, Pirandello, Betti, De Filippo and Fo. Critical approach designations: Genres, Media.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 185K Studies in the Italian Novel

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Italian required. A study of the development of the novel in Italy with attention to the cultural context. Critical approach designations: Genres, Geographies.

Credits

5

LIT 185O Ariosto

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Italian required. Devoted primarily to reading in detail the major epic/romance of Renaissance Italy, the Orlando Furioso. Special attention to the 16th-century Italian political climate, the life of the courts, and the contemporary gender debate taken up by Ariosto. Critical approach designations: Canons, Genres. Distribution requirements: Poetry, Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 185R Machiavelli

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Italian required. Study of the literary and political works of one of the most influential political thinkers of modernity. Readings include The Prince, selections from the Discourses and from Machiavelli's letters, at least one of Machiavelli's comedies, and his misogynist novella, Belfago. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories.

Credits

5

Instructor

Deanna Shemek

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 186E Latin Prose Composition

Reading proficiency in Latin required. An introduction to Latin prose composition. Begins with formal composition exercises, progresses to close stylistic analyses of selected passages and free compositions modeled on them. Critical approach designations: Canons, Genres. Distribution requirement: Poetry, Pre-1750.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 188C Autobiography in the Spanish Renaissance

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Spanish required. Study of the phenomenon of the boom of a literary genre in Renaissance Spain: the autobiography. Why do soldiers, conquerors, picaros, and monks reveal their selves and their life experiences? What are common aspects and what do these texts reveal about the historic reality? Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 188D Introduction to the Golden Age

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Spanish required. An introduction to representative works of the main genres of the period by authors such as Garcilaso de la Vega, Luis de León, San Juan de la Cruz, Santa Teresa de Jesús, Lope de Vega, Francisco de Quevedo, and Calderón de la Barca, and to life in Spain during the 16th and 17th centuries. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750

Credits

5

LIT 188J El teatro en los s. XVI&ndash;XVII

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Spanish required. An overview of the development in Spanish theater during the sixteenth and 17th centuries. Special emphasis is placed on the works of Lope de Vega and Calderón de la Barca. Shows how Lope e Vega, considered the father of theater in Spain, changed the medieval conception of theater and influenced the creation of theater of the same epoch. In this context, plays of Sor Juana and Ruiz de Alarcón are studied. Critical approach designations: Canons, Media. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750.

Credits

5

LIT 188K Garc&iacute;a Lorca and the Generation of '98

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Spanish required. Readings in the poetry of Spain since 1898 with a study of the main currents in Spanish and European poetry in the 20th century. Course concentrates on the works of García Lorca, as well as the poetry of Alberti, Machado, Aleixandre, and others. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories. Distribution requirement: Poetry.

Credits

5

LIT 188N Poetry of the Spanish Diaspora

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Spanish required. Focuses on the problematics of exile as it affects Spanish poetry, granting central attention to the period of Francoist dictatorship. Course work includes readings of Prados, Cernuda, Alberti, Altolaguirre, et al. Secondary readings on appropriate history and literary and cultural criticism. Critical approach designations: Genres, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Poetry.

Credits

5

LIT 189J Social Documentary: Histories, Theories, Practice

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Spanish required. Examines the forms and functions of film and video documentary throughout Latin America from the 1950s to the present. Emphasizes engagement with historical events, political conflicts, and social movements, along with changing theories and perceptions of documentary. Critical approach designations: Genres, Media. Distribution requirement: Global

Credits

5

Instructor

Julianne Burton-Carvajal

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 189W Literatures of the Spanish-Speaking Caribbean

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Spanish required. By reading Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican texts, explores questions of modernity and postmodernity, of cultural, political, gender, and racial identities, while also addressing the position of Caribbean literature within the Latin American literary canon. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Global

Credits

5

Instructor

Lourde Martinez-Echazabal

LIT 189Y African-Latin American Literature

Speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in Spanish required. By reading sociological, historical, and political writings dealing with race mixture, race relations and cultural/national identity in Latin America, delves into the ideology of Mestizaje particularly African-Spanish and African-Portuguese, and its representation in visual and literary texts. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Global

Credits

5

Instructor

Lourde Martinez-Echazabal

LIT 190B Theories of Meaning

Focuses on theories of meaning advanced in premodern and early modern Europe. Authors include Aristotle, Augustine, Capellus, Plato, and Shakespeare. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750, Senior Seminar.

Credits

5

LIT 190C Love and Death in Medieval Literature

A study of the development of the courtly love tradition in medieval France and Italy; examination of the construction of gender, authorship, and the interconnections among Eros, madness, and death. Works include troubadour poetry, romances of Chrètien de Troyes, tales of Marie de France, Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio. Critical approach designations: Genres, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750, Senior Seminar.

Credits

5

LIT 190D Making Europe in the Middle Ages

Examines the emergence of a common culture in western Europe, 1050-1500. Topics include internal colonization and frontier societies, Latin Christendom and vernacular cultures, and crusades and the perception of cultural differences. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750, Senior Seminar.

Credits

5

LIT 190E Studies in Early Modern British Literature

Study of selected authors or issues in early modern British literature. Course topic changes; see the Class Search for current topic. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories. Distribution requirements: Pre-1750, Senior Seminar.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): LIT 101. Enrollment is restricted to senior literature majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 190G Frame Tale Fictions

Introduces several major works of world literature through their shared employment of the frame tale. Topics: permutations of stories as they pass from collection to collection, frame's narrative structure, meaning of storytelling within such collections. Readings: The Arabian Nights, The Decameron and selected modern texts. Critical approach designations: Genres, Histories. Distribution requirement: Pre-1750, Senior Seminar.

Credits

5

Instructor

Deanna Shemek

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): LIT 101. Enrollment is restricted to senior literature majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 190H Studies in the Horror Film

The horror genre in film: Nosferatu (1921) to the present. Using the U.S. as a reference point, the course considers problems of genre definition and canon formation, historical and international developments, social and psychological perspectives. Critical approach designations: Genres, Media. Distribution requirement: Senior Seminar.

Credits

5

Instructor

H Leicester

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 190M Women Novelists

Students will read novels by such 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century novelists as Ann Radcliffe, Elizabeth Inchbald, Jane Austen, Emily and Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, and Virginia Woolf. Critical, historical, and theoretical texts will be assigned, and a lengthy seminar paper is required. Critical approach designations: Genres, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Senior Seminar.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): LIT 101. Enrollment is restricted to senior literature majors.

LIT 190P Literature and Other Media: Visions of Carmen

Carmen as literary text, opera, and film. Critical approach designations: Genres, Media. Distribution requirement: Senior Seminar.

Credits

5

Instructor

H Leicester

LIT 190Q Studies in 20th-Century British Literature

Intensive study of selected authors or other issues in 20th-century British literature. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Histories. Distribution requirement: Senior Seminar.

Credits

5

Instructor

Vilashini Cooppan

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): LIT 101. Enrollment is restricted to senior literature majors.

LIT 190R <I>The Magic Mountain</I>

An intensive study of Thomas Mann's great novel of ideas, The Magic Mountain, with a focus on its brilliant analysis of German and European culture in the early years of the 20th century, and its prophetic anticipation of the rise of German Nazism and other Fascist movements. Critical approach designations: Canons, Histories. Distribution requirement: Senior Seminar.

Credits

5

LIT 190S Imagining the Pacific: Colonial Narratives, Postcolonial Contestations

Studies tropes, narratives, discourses, and genres used to represent the Pacific as a region of (a) Euro-American fascination and control since the era of colonial contact; (b) counter-hegemonic, local, and indigenous perspectives that have reclaimed cultural-national identity since decolonizing ferment of the 1970s. Critical approach designations: Geographies, Power and Subjectivities. Distribution requirement: Senior Seminar.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

LIT 140B Archaeology of Power

Credits

LIT 155I Violence in Contemporary American Film

Credits

LIT 203 The Theory and Practice of Teaching Writing

An introduction to current theory and research on the teaching of writing and discussion of practical strategies for applying that research not only in composition classes but throughout the curriculum as well.

Credits

5

LIT 209Y Modern Literary Studies

The course topic changes; please see the Schedule of Classes for the current topic.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 209Z Modern Literary Studies

The course topic changes; please see the Class Search for the current topic.

Credits

3

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to literature graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 230E Twentieth-Century Russian Literary Theory

Twentieth-century Russian literary theory from Formalism and Marxism to Bakhtin and contemporary Soviet semiotics. Seminal theoretical and literary texts are discussed in the context of Soviet literary culture and politics: literary polemics of the twenties, subsequent consolidation of Communist Party control and the monopoly of Socialist Realism, post-Stalinist thaw, and the development of the Moscow and Tartu schools of semiotics.

Credits

5

LIT 231B Archaeology of Power

Historical study of the concept of power as institutionalized in Indo-European society, elaborated in the ancient world, and bequeathed to the nation-states (Eastern and Western) of today. Focus is on the logic and ideas implicit in basic political, military, economic, and social structures. Readings in history, anthropology, linguistics, religion, political science, and myth.

Credits

5

LIT 232A Nationalist Geographies of Film Melodrama

Examines theories of film melodrama, genre theories, film language and visual style, and constructions of the nations as exemplified by Asian, European, Latin American and U.S. films, with special emphasis on Mexican, Cuban, and Argentinian examples. No prior film expertise necessary.

Credits

5

LIT 232B Gender/Interpretation/Film

Examines changing paradigms of gender in Latin American feature films (1940-1990), exploring the applicability of currents of western feminist, gender theory to these peripheral texts. Provides instruction and practice designing college-level film courses.

Credits

5

LIT 232C Texts and Bodies: Representations of Desire in Four Texts, Three Media

1. Psychoanalysis: Barthes and Lacan; 2. Chaucer and fabliau: The Miller's Tale; 3. Verdian opera; 4. Films of John Carpenter.

Credits

5

Instructor

H Leicester

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 233A Gender and Interpretation

The study of assorted fiction, poetry, and interpretive writing by women, with an eye to the implications of gender for literary theory and practice.

Credits

5

LIT 233B The Fantastic

Through literary, critical, and theoretical texts, explores fantastic fiction as the subversive other of the bourgeois novel: a form which interrogates conventional narrative forms and theories of genre and reveals cultural anxieties about sexuality, subjectivity, racial and gender identity, religion, science, and the family. Authors include Walpole, Austen, Radcliffe, Le Fanu, de Sade, M. Shelley, Poe, E. Bronte, Hawthorne, Melville, B. Stoker, Conan Doyle, H. James, Conrad, Faulkner, Kafka, Toni Morrison, Lacan, Kristeva, Edmund Burke, Fanon, E. Said, P. Macherey, F. Jameson, Freud.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 233C Freud and Lacan

An in-depth overview of the early-mid periods of Freud's thought, beginning with the Project for a Scientific Psychology through the metapsychological texts of 1914-1918. The later Freud is discussed in the contexts of the career and writings of Jacques Lacan, in particular Lacan's doctoral dissertation, and the Seminars I and II. Both writers are assessed individually and in dialogue in discussions framed by contemporary critical theory, semiotics, and questions concerning cinematic practice. Special attention is paid to Lacan's analysis of Poe's The Purloined Letter.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

LIT 233D Representation

Close reading of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason as the basis of modern critical thought. Focus is on the theory of representation and its reception both in 19th-century philosophy (Hegel, Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche) and 20th-century literary theory (Saussure, Freud, Heidegger, Derrida, de Man, Foucault, gender and cultural studies).

Credits

5

LIT 237B Logics of Modernism

Explores fundamental concepts and aesthetico-political principles of key avant-garde movements: futurism, expressionism, Vorticism, Proletcult, and constructivsm. Particular focus on the interpretations of basic avant-garde frameworks in national contexts ranging from Great Britain to Italy and Germany to countries of Central and Eastern Europe.

Credits

5

Instructor

Tyrus Miller

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 238 Postmodernism

Key debates and central theorists of postmodernism.

Credits

5

Instructor

Richard Terdiman, Jody Greene

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter, Spring

LIT 239 Literary Posthumanism/s

Concentrates on a reading of 19th- and 20th-century texts that interrogate the mainstream Western anthropocentric humanist tradition. Issues include the values of self-consciousness, autonomous agency, individual rights, hostility to technology, prostheses, cyborg identity and boundary confusions, postmodern technosublime, paranoia, and the domestication of cyberspace.

Credits

5

LIT 240A Studies in Antiquity

An in-depth study of a topic in Mediterranean and Near Eastern antiquity.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

LIT 240B Ancient Novel

Narrative fiction from the age of Alexander through the first centuries of the Christian era, with particular attention to the influence of Near Eastern and African cultures on the formation of the European novel. Principal readings: The Alexander Romance, Petronius, Apuleius, Khariton, Achilles Tatius, Heliodoros.

Credits

5

LIT 240C The Body in Antiquity

Focuses on the political, historical, and ontological construction of the body in ancient Greek culture. Literary, historical, philosophical, and medical texts (Homer, Herodotus, Plato, Aristotle, Hippocrates) as well as visual media (vase painting, sculpture) are studied.

Credits

5

LIT 240D The Literature of Classical Athens

Primary texts from the fifth and fourth centuries B.C.E. in Athens, including drama, historical narrative, philosophy, zoological and medical treatises will be read in their historical, political, and spatial or architectural contexts and in relation to contemporary literary and cultural theory. Knowledge of Greek is not required.

Credits

5

LIT 240E The Rhetoric of Tragedy: Politics, Ideology, and Spectacle

Devoted to situating Greek tragic production within the political, historical, and cultural contexts of the polis and the western canon. Topics include the origins of tragedy, tragedy as a civic and political institution, the dramatic festival, the tragic construction of gender, mimesis.

Credits

5

LIT 240F Orphic Poetry

Examines varying interpretations, appropriations, and exploitations of the Orphic myth in its threefold manifestation as harmony, descent, and dismemberment. Topics include the regeneration of language, the poet as priest, and the re-sacralization of an increasingly secularized world.

Credits

5

LIT 241A Medieval Epic

Medieval reworkings of stories and motifs drawn from the barbarian or Germanic tradition, including Beowulf, The Song of Roland, the Nibelungenlied, Snorri Sturlason: King Harald's Saga from Heimskringla, Njal's Saga.

Credits

5

LIT 242A Renaissance Woman/Renaissance Man

Explores the European inheritance of definitions of woman (and by implication, man), through a study of key literary texts and historical documents from the early modern period. Emphasis on Italian and English texts; work in other European languages welcome.

Credits

5

LIT 242B Queering the Renaissance

Seeks to understand the recent convergence in early modern scholarship between queer theory and Renaissance studies and to explore the definitions and articulations of queer theory as a mode of textual criticism and practice.

Credits

5

Instructor

Carla Freccero

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

LIT 243C Early Modern Italian Women Writers

In early modern Italy several factors converged to foster a boom in women's writing and publication. Course addresses context and content of these writings, dealing with key theoretical and historical issues surrounding women's entry into authorship in Europe. Knowledge of Italian not required.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 244 Libertinism

Libertinism as a literary, philosophical, ethical, and cultural movement in England and France, 1650-1800. Three distinct but overlapping definitions of libertinism: religious atheism, philosophical materialism, and sexual license. Readings include Moliere, Behn, Rochester, Montesquieu, Diderot, Cleland, La Clos, and Sade.

Credits

5

LIT 245 Italian Epic

Examines Italy's epic tradition against backdrop of its political and cultural history. Readings may include (subject to availability) Pulci's Morgante, Boiardo's Orlando Innamorato, Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, and Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata. Reading knowledge of Italian highly recommended.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 252 Postcolonial Theory, Premodern Texts

What are the advantages and limitations of using postcolonial theory to study the Latin Middle Ages (twelfth–fifteenth centuries)? Topics include changing modes of cultural contact (commerce, crusade), the representation of internal minorities (Jews, heretics, slaves), and the emergence of nationalist thinking.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 253 Globalization and Localization of Cultural Identity

Deals with some reigning models of global/local dialectics, with literary and filmic texts as examples and challenges to these dominant theoretical frameworks. Also discusses tactics and emergences of transnational cultural studies in Asian-Pacific contexts.

Credits

5

LIT 282E Modern French/Francophone Philosophies of Difference

Examines select modern French/Francophone philosophical and psychoanalytic discussions of difference in the work of Lacan, Fanon, Irigaray, Derrida, and Deleuze and their influence on current critical theory. Texts are studied in French although students may use translations.

Credits

5

Instructor

Carla Freccero

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

LIT 285A Italian Autobiography

Examines various critical perspectives on the writing of autobiography in Italy, including issues of gender; the construction of the self; theories of representation, narratology, and lyric form; political context. Principal readings in Italian: Dante, Petrarch, Renaissance female poets, Ugo Foscolo, Natalia Ginzburg, Primo Levi. Selected readings from St. Augustine, Rousseau, R. Barthes.

Credits

5

LIT 285B Modern Italian Poetry

Study of the development of the Italian lyric from Romanticism to the present, with close stylistic and thematic analyses of the works of Leopardi, D'Annunzio, Ungaretti, Quasimodo, Pavese, and Montale.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 285C Studies in the Italian Novel: Postmodern

Close reading of several texts that participate in Italian post-modern writing. Discussion of the postmodern return to narrative and its emphasis on readers; the attenuation of grand narratives of history, politics, and science; the functions of pastiche and play; self-reflexivity. Readings and discussion conducted in Italian.

Credits

5

LIT 285D Literature and Fascism

Addresses Italy's literature and film of the postwar period, with emphasis on the use of these media in the nation's attempt to come to grips with its experience in fascism and the Resistance.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

LIT 285E Boccaccio

Critical study of the Decameron.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 285F Machiavelli and Italian Humanism

Study of the literary and political works of one of the most influential political thinkers of modernity. Readings include The Prince, selections from the Discourse and from Machiavelli's letters, at least one of Machiavelli's comedies, and his misogynist novella, Belfagor.Course taught in Italian.

Credits

5

LIT 285G Petrarch

Close reading of the poetry of Francesco Petrarch (1304-1374); examination of his construction of a modern lyric subjectivity and a poetics of desire.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 286 Roman Poetry

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

LIT 288A Autobiography in the Spanish Renaissance

Study of the phenomenon of the boom of a literary genre in Renaissance Spain: the autobiography. Why do soldiers, conquerors, picaros, and monks reveal their selves and their life experiences? What are common aspects and what do these texts reveal about the historic reality?

Credits

5

LIT 288B Topics in Spanish Golden Age Literature

Focuses on different genres of the Renaissance period that flourished before the creation of Cervantes' Don Quijote. The course topic changes; see the Schedule of Classes for the current topic.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jorge Aladro Font

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 288D Prose Works of Cervantes

Study of the prose works of Cervantes (excluding his masterpiece Don Quixote) in order to understand the sociohistorical implications, and his ideology and style, which ultimately leads to a better understanding of Don Quixote. The texts studied give a panorama of the literary genres (pastoral novel, picaresque novel, etc.) during the Golden Age period and, simultaneously, serve as an introduction to the literature of Renaissance Spain.

Credits

5

LIT 288E Eros y mistica

In-depth examination of mysticism: Jewish, Christian, and Arabic; and of eroticism. Also looks at the idea of union in mysticism and eroticism.

Credits

5

LIT 288G Cultura, nacionalismo y estado en el siglo XIX latinoamericano

Explores three related problematics: emergence of literature as a specialized social discourse, nationalism and education, coloniality and postcoloniality. Important questions: what are the national language and culture, what is the gender/genre of the nation.

Credits

5

LIT 288H Nineteenth- and 20th-Century Spanish American Novels

By reading literary, critical, and theoretical texts, the seminar explores the various courses mapped by the genre in Spanish America since 1816 to the present. However, because of its board chronological range, it is done by focusing on selected topics and/or periods. May be repeated for credit as seminar topic varies.

Credits

5

LIT 288I Novelist as Critic

Since its origins, the novel in Spanish America has been one of the strongest vehicles for social protest and identity quest. Concentrates on novel theories as expressed by Spanish American novelists from the 19th through 20th century, showing the development and uniqueness of the genre in Spanish America. Novelists include: de Lizardi, Gómez de Avellaneda, Isaacs, Azuela, Gallegos, Asturias, Carpentier, Bombal, Castellanos, García Marquez, Fuentes, Puig, Vargas Llosa, Sarduy, Ferré, Barnet, Allende.

Credits

5

LIT 288J Twentieth-Century Spanish American Essay

A study of the essay in Spanish America from Sarmiento to the present which has fundamentally concentrated on problems of national or cultural identity. Authors include Martínez, Estrada, Mariátegui, Paz Castellanos, Salazar Bondy, Benedetti, Poniatowska, J.L. Gonzalez, Retamar, Monsivais, Ferré.

Credits

5

LIT 288K Twentieth-Century Spanish American Poetry

Addresses the ways in which poets and poetic movements have responded aesthetically to the region's (Latin America) geography of social, political and cultural experience. Trace the private and public voices who responded imaginatively creating a new poetics. Major movements such as modernismo, poesía pura las vanguardias, la anti-poesía poesía conversacional, pos-vanguardismo, and their major exponents are studied, as well as other poetic voices previously overlooked or underestimated.

Credits

5

LIT 288L Literature of the Spanish-Speaking Caribbean

By reading Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican texts, explores questions of modernity and postmodernity of cultural, political, gender, and racial identities, while also addressing the position of Caribbean literatures within the Latin American literary canon.

Credits

5

LIT 288N Literature and the African Diaspora in Latin America

Explores the literary creation of authors of African descent in Latin America. In addition to the study of Island, or Plantation literatures/societies, this course also derives into areas of the South American Pacific Rim where, by virtue of its natural resources, economics, and mode of colonization, a different kind of Afro-American literature, culture, and society has been produced. Students must be fluent in Spanish.

Credits

5

LIT 288Q Gender and Representation: Contemporary Mexican Women Writers

Modern Mexican women writers' struggle for interpretive power. Concentrating on autobiographical fictions, texts are read against Latin American feminist and cultural theories. Special attention is given to the particular problematics of gender, nation, and narration in postrevolutionary Mexico.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

LIT 288R Modernism and Postmodernism: The Debate in Latin America

Addresses the problematics of these concepts as they relate to literary and cultural production in Latin America.

Credits

5

Instructor

Norma Klahn

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

LIT 288T Latin American Film and Cultural Theory

An examination of Latin American and Latino films in connection with relevant social and cultural issues and theories. Reading knowledge of Spanish is required.

Credits

5

Instructor

Juan Poblete

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

LIT 288V Reconstructing Spain

Construction of new discourses of Spanishness after 1975, their negotiation in the context of European integration/globalization and against historical memories.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jorge Aladro Font

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

LIT 288W Becoming European

Course considers the process of globalization as it has affected Spain in the last ten years. Through the study of a variety of cultural texts, it explores the challenges presented to national identity and the emergence of new subjectivities and collective identities.

Credits

5

LIT 288X Historica de la lectura y los lectores: recepcion y consumo cultural en el mundo Latino Americano

What is the role of reading in the theoretical revisions encompassed under the rubric of Latin American Cultural Studies? What changes and contributions have brought about the Cultural Studies emphasis on key words such as production-reception, consumption, resemantization, and reappropriation? These questions provide a framework for a historical-theoretical reconstruction of the place of reading and readers in Latin American cultural history.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

MATH 10A Basic Calculus

Algebra and trigonometry review, differentiation, applications of differentiation, integration, applications of integration, series, vectors and matrices, differential equations. Designed for students who desire to learn calculus with less detail than in the corresponding 11A-B sequence. Students cannot receive credit for both a 10 course and the corresponding 11 course.

Credits

5

MATH 10B Basic Calculus

Algebra and trigonometry review, differentiation, applications of differentiation, integration, applications of integration, series, vectors and matrices, differential equations. Designed for students who desire to learn calculus with less detail than in the corresponding 11A-B sequence. Students cannot receive credit for both a 10 course and the corresponding 11 course

Credits

5

MATH 12C Applied Linear Algebra

Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, euclidean spaces, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Extensive computational work on computers in a campus Macintosh lab. Integrates both the computational and the theoretical aspects of linear algebra. No prior computer experience is needed. Concurrent enrollment in course 12L is required. One quarter of college mathematics is recommended.

Credits

5

MATH 13 Vector Calculus

The derivative as a linear transformation. Directional derivatives, gradients, divergence, and curl. Maxima and minima. Integrals on paths and surfaces. Green, Stokes, and Gauss theorems.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

MATH 28 Introduction to Computational Number Theory

Prime numbers, congruences, Euclid's algorithm. The theorems of Fermat and Lagrange. The reduction of arithmetic calculations to the case of prime-power modulus. The use of quadratic residues. Computational aspects of primality testing, and factorization techniques. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 18. High school algebra is recommended; knowledge of a computer language is useful.

Credits

5

MATH 28L Laboratory for Computational Number Theory

Laboratory sequence illustrating topics covered in course 28. One three-hour session per week in microcomputer laboratory. Concurrent enrollment in course 28 is required.

Credits

1

MATH 50 Introduction to Fractal Geometry I: Iterated Function Systems and L-Systems

Definition and measurement of fractal dimension, self-similarity and self-affinity, iterated function and L-systems, random fractals, diffusion limited aggregation models, multi-fractals, Julia and Mandelbrot sets, rewriting systems, image compression, chaos and fractals. Concurrent enrollment in course 50L is required.

Credits

5

MATH 50L Fractal Geometry I Laboratory

Laboratory sequence illustrating topics covered in course 150. One three-hour session per week in microcomputer laboratory. Concurrent enrollment in course 150 is required.

Credits

1

MATH 80A What is Mathematics?

A broad overview of the subject, intended primarily for liberal arts students. What do mathematicians do, and why do they do it? Examines the art of proving theorems, from both the philosophical and aesthetic points of view, using examples such as non-Euclidean geometrics, prime numbers, abstract groups, and uncountable sets. Emphasis on appreciating the beauty and variety of mathematical ideas. Includes a survey of important results and unsolved problems which motivate mathematical research.

Credits

5

MATH 80B Nature of Mathematics

A survey course, aimed at non-science students, providing an understanding of some fundamental concepts of higher mathematics. Is mathematics a natural science? Do mathematicians discover or invent? Discussion of such questions in connection with such topics as numbers (whole, prime, negative, irrational, round, imaginary, binary, transfinite, infinitesimal, etc.), logic, symmetry, various types of geometry, and some recent developments. Basic high school algebra and geometry is sufficient background. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 80A.

Credits

5

MATH 124A Topology and Manifolds

Intrinsic properties of spaces such as tori, Möbius strips, and Klein bottles and methods for classifying them. A: Basic point set topology, covering spaces, homotopy, simplicial complexes, genus, Fundamental Theorem of Surfaces. B: Manifolds, simplicial homology, differential forms, and DeRham cohomology.

Credits

5

MATH 124B Topology and Manifolds

Intrinsic properties of spaces such as tori, Möbius strips, and Klein bottles and methods for classifying them. A: Basic point set topology, covering spaces, homotopy, simplicial complexes, genus, Fundamental Theorem of Surfaces. B: Manifolds, simplicial homology, differential forms, and DeRham cohomology.

Credits

5

MATH 125 Calculus of Variations

History and development of the calculus of variations; sufficient and necessary conditions for a minimum; Euler-Lagrange equations; Hamilton Jacobi theory; the theory of geodesics; parametric variational problems.

Credits

5

MATH 131B Advanced Probability Theory

Classical probability theory. Random variables, expectation and moments, independence. The major families of distributions and their properties; characteristic functions, infinite divisibility. Limit theorems on sums of random variables, random walks, Markov processes, Martingales, ruin.

Credits

5

MATH 133 Applied Regression

Topics include bivariate and multiple regression with residual, multicolinearity, and sequential selection analysis. ANOVA with multiple comparisons, unbalanced and missing data analysis and repeated measure models. Experimental designs (completely randomized block and splitplot). Statistical software packages.

Credits

5

MATH 138 Decision Theory and Game Theory

Statistical decision theory as used for modeling and resolving problems in a variety of fields, from agriculture to artificial intelligence. Basic statistical models, decision trees, utilities and rewards, risk and loss functions, principles of assessing probabilities, Bayes decisions and Bayes estimation. Also group utilities, conflicts of interest, two person zero-sum games, optimal strategies, the minimax theorem.

Credits

5

MATH 139 Introduction to Stochastic Processes

The theory and application of stochastic processes as models for empirical phenomena (time-series), with special emphasis on the following processes: Wiener, Poisson, stationary, normal, counting, renewal, Markov, and birth-death.

Credits

5

MATH 141L Nonlinear Mathematics Laboratory

Laboratory sequence illustrating topics covered in course 141. One three-hour session per week in microcomputer laboratory. Concurrent enrollment in course 141 is required.

Credits

1

MATH 142 Introduction to Mathematica

Symbolic integration and differentiation; symbolic manipulation of algebraic equations; linear algebra; graphs of functions with one or two variables; parametric surfaces in three-dimensional space; solutions of ordinary differential equations; error estimates; elementary programming.

Credits

5

MATH 142L Mathematica Laboratory

Laboratory sequence illustrating topics covered in course 142. One three-hour session per week in microcomputer laboratory. Concurrent enrollment in course 142 is required.

Credits

1

MATH 143 Computational Mathematics

Solving mathematical problems in a Unix environment using the C++ programming language. In addition, software packages such as LAPACK, MACSYMA, MATLAB, and Numerical Recipes are used. Computational problems in both pure and applied mathematics are discussed. Use of other machines on the Internet, such as the Cray supercomputer in San Diego is explained. Students are expected to know how to program in some language, not necessarily C++. Concurrent enrollment in course 143L is required.

Credits

5

MATH 143L Computational Mathematics Laboratory

Laboratory sequence illustrating topics covered in course 143.One three-hour session per week in microcomputer laboratory. Concurrent enrollment in course 143 is required.

Credits

1

MATH 144 Advanced Computational Mathematics

Solving mathematical problems in a C++ UNIX environment. The C++ programming language along with mathematical software tools such as MACSYMA and MATLAB are used to attack problems in pure and applied mathematics. A thorough knowledge of C is assumed. Concurrent enrollment in course 144L is required.

Credits

5

MATH 144L Advanced Computational Mathematics Laboratory

Laboratory sequence illustrating topics covered in course 144. One three-hour session per week in microcomputer laboratory. Concurrently enrollment in course 144 is required.

Credits

1

MATH 147 Dynamical Models

A survey of strategies for building dynamical models for complex natural systems, with exemplary models taken from the literature of the biological and social sciences. Concurrent enrollment in course 147L is required.

Credits

5

MATH 147L Dynamical Models Laboratory

Laboratory sequence illustrating topics covered in course 147. One three-hour sessionper week in microcomputer laboratory. Concurrent enrollment in course 147 is required.

Credits

1

MATH 151 Introduction to Fractal Geometry II

Study of random fractals and holomorphic dynamical systems. Percolation theory, diffusion limited aggregation models, Brownian motion, Julia sets for rational functions, bifurcation sets and the Mandelbrot set.

Credits

5

MATH 151L Fractal Geometry II Laboratory (.2 course credit)

Laboratory sequence illustrating topics covered in course 151. One three-hour session per week in microcomputer laboratory.

Credits

1

MERR 10 Becoming a Successful Student

An interactive course providing the opportunity to assess and revise methods of and purposes in studying. Critical, effective approaches to reading, writing, participating in lectures and sections, taking exams, balancing competing responsibilities, and utilizing campus resources are explored. Contact college office for interview-only criteria.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

MERR 20J Chemistry in the Multicultural World: Environment, Experience, and Explanation

Examines the dominant and defining characteristics and role of chemistry in the multicultural world, covering such areas as folklore, legends, rituals, as well as everyday manifestations of chemistry.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Spring

MERR 20Q Brazilian Culture Through Film

Through selected readings, viewing and discussion of eight to ten Brazilian films, explores key topics pertaining to Brazilian culture and society. Topics include: urban violence and street children, Brazilian slavery, religions in Brazil, the development of the amazon region, and gender and interracial relations, amongst others.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Fall

MERR 20R China on Film

Examines the representation of China's recent history and contemporary social problems in Chinese films of the past thirty years. Meets once a week for five weeks for viewing and discussion of films. Students complete readings and film evaluation forms.

Credits

1

Quarter offered

Spring

MERR 21 Perspectives on Bilingual/Multicultural Education

Theoretical and practical perspectives of bilingualism and bilingual education in the U.S. Introduces issues that have special relevance for those considering a career in teaching culturally and linguistically diverse populations. Focuses on the following areas: experiences of diverse student populations in California schools, second language development, evolution and consequences of bilingualism in individuals and communities, historical and policy perspectives on bilingual education, and innovative instructional approaches and strategies used in bilingual education programs and classrooms.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Spring

MERR 21B Queer Culture and Politics in America

Examines gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) culture and politics in America. Topics include GLBT identity; transgender and intersexuality issues; intersections of race, class, and gender; legal issues; homophobia, heterosexism, and the anti-gay Right; political strategies and media images; and health and spirituality.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

MERR 21C Asian Pacific Islander Leadership

Addresses theoretical and practical approaches to activism on issues pertaining to the Asian Pacific Islander community in the U.S. Focuses on: historical movements and struggles, theory and research, contemporary movements and struggles, needs assessment, and critical theory.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Spring

MERR 21E The Women of Color Community in America

Examines the issues and forceswhich have shaped the culture of women of color in the United States. Students are expected to critically analyze theories and contemporary issues. Students cannot receive credit for this course after taking Women's Studies 145.

Credits

2

MERR 21F Identity Exploration through Art

Teaches various art and craft techniques with the goal of exploring personal identity in a sociocultural context. In-class discussion and art/craft projects address the social significance of gender, sexuality, culture, race, and class as well as the cultural roots and significance of the art forms presented.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

MERR 21G Introduction to Hawaiian Music

This two-unit course examines Hawaiian music and its relationship to the people and land of Hawaii. Students will identify songwriters, musical styles, and must evaluate one local Hawaiian event on April 5, 2000. Transportation and admission provided.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Spring

MERR 22A International Perspectives on Minority Status and Schooling

Introduces students to the literature on minority status and schooling in Western Europe, Israel, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada, with some U.S. comparisons. Addresses issues of variability between and within minority groups and the role of cultural, structural, and psychological factors in students' educational performance.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Spring

MERR 22C A History of Japanese Crafts

Examines the material culture of Japan from a social historical perspective. Examines various genres of crafts, how they were made, what groups made them, and how they were related to the general economy of different periods in Japanese history.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Spring

MERR 22D Latin American Human Rights Through Film

Militarism, state repression, and the continuing struggle for human rights in Latin America, with particular emphasis on Brazil and the Southern Cone. Emphasis on films, supplemented by contemporary written reports.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Spring

MERR 80D White Racial Identity in a Multicultural Society

Examines white racial identity in the U.S., including different manifestations of racism, white privilege, white culture, inter-racial and intra-racial relations. Students develop and implement action plans to combat racism. Experiential format.

Credits

5

Instructor

Gary Shoemaker

Quarter offered

Spring

MERR 80L Merrill Core Visual Laboratory

Visual laboratory designed to work in tandem with the Merrill Core Course to enhance learning for students with diverse skills and learning styles.

Credits

2

Requirements

Open to first-year Merrill students currently enrolled in course 80A, 80B, or 80X. Required of students in the Merrill Frosh Scholars Program. Concurrent enrollment in course 80A, 80B, or 80X is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

MERR 80X Introduction to University Discourse: Cultural Identities and Global Consciousness(Frosh Scholar)

Explores rhetorical principles and conventions of university discourse, providing intensive practice in analytical writing, critical reading, and speaking. Examines world poverty, imperialism, and nationalism; people's need to assert their cultural identities; and the benefits of individuals' absorption in worthy causes. Permission of instructor required; selection for this year-long scholars program based on application submitted prior to fall quarter. Enrollment restricted to first-year college members.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

MERR 80Y The Perspective of First Peoples (Freshman Scholars)

Interdisciplinary and comparative examination of American Indian peoples' history, literature, and ecological and environmental activism. Careful reading of documentary history and sampling of novels, tales, poems, and environmental essays by American Indian writers. Material from all North American First Peoples' cultural areas. Merrill College members are selected for this year-long scholars program on the basis of an application submitted prior to fall quarter.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

MERR 80Z Merrill Scholars Seminar

Research-based, writing-intensive seminar focusing on the construction of persuasive arguments. Explores topics of cultural, historical, and/or political interest, taught by a Merrill College Fellow. Topic will change yearly. Enrollment restricted to Merrill Frosh Scholars program participants.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

MERR 85A Merrill Classroom Connection Field Study

Supervised hands-on experience assisting in classrooms and after-school programs at local schools including one-on-one mentoring, small group instruction, art projects, and playgrounds. Includes weekly sections, readings of practical and theoretical relevance, field notes, and a final paper. Permission of instructor required; contact Classroom Connection Coordinator at 459-5671.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

MERR 111 Religious Paradigms of World History and the U.S.

Speculation about the course of world history in some traditional religious (African and Native American), Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Chinese religions are critically discussed. Similar speculations in modern writers and the place of the U.S. in all are outlined.

Credits

5

MERR 112 History of San Francisco

Examines the history of San Francisco from Spanish settlement forward. Studies architecture, urban history, city politics, society, and culture. Students read extensively, tour the city, and complete a research project. Background in California history is recommended.

Credits

3

Quarter offered

Spring

MERR 130A Women in Satyajit Ray's Cinema

Focus is on the women's questions in Satyajit Ray's cinema in general from biographical, historical, and cultural perspectives. In addition, an in-depth study of six selected films: Two Daughters, Kanchenjungha, Devi, Mahanagar, Charulata, Home and the World.

Credits

3

Quarter offered

Spring

MERR 151 American Indians and the Vietnam War

Examines memoirs of American Indians who served in the military during the Vietnam War. Examines the homecoming and transition back into society. Students interview American Indian Vietnam veterans.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dennis Tibbetts

Quarter offered

Winter

MERR 152 America's Combat Vets: Narratives, Analysis, and Discussion

Focus is twofold: 1) to develop an understanding of veterans, and 2) to conduct interviews with veterans that will become part of the Veterans History Project archived at the Library of Congress.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dennis Tibbetts

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Winter

METX 104 Interdisciplinary Training in Environmental Toxicology

Laboratory course for advanced undergraduates. Emphasizes training in broad and interdisciplinary analytical and technological approaches to problems in toxicology, direct intensive participation, and critical thinking skills.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOL 20C, and BIOL 100 or equivalent.

Quarter offered

Spring

METX 110 Scientific Presentations

Presentation of scientific research in academic formats. These include both oral and poster presentations. The presentations will be based on original research conducted by each student.

Credits

3

Instructor

A Flegal

Quarter offered

Fall

METX 120 Environmental Statistical Analysis

Provides a fundamental understanding of data generation, sampling design, and statistical analysis. Environmentally related data sets will be analyzed either by hand or using the statistical package Minitab.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

METX 130 Principles of Environmental Toxicology

Presents the principles of environmental toxicology, including the major classes of toxicants, environmental movement and fate, toxicokinetics, xenobiotic biotransformation, toxicodynamics, factors influencing toxicity, mechanisms of toxic action and detoxication, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity, toxicity testing and evaluation, and risk assessment.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

METX 138 Pathogenesis: Molecular Mechanisms of Disease

Overview of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying human disease at the physiological and molecular levels, with their implications for epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Includes discussion of clinical cases and of emerging areas of research. Geared toward students interested in future research or clinical careers in the area of human or animal health. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology 238.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

BIOL 118

Instructor

Manel Camps

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 130. Enrollment is restricted to students majoring in biology; health sciences; molecular, cell, and developmental biology; biochemistry and molecular biology; or neuroscience and behavior.

Quarter offered

Spring

METX 204 Interdisciplinary Training in Environmental Toxicology

A laboratory course for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Emphasizes training in broad and interdisciplinary analytical and technological approaches to problems in toxicology, direct intensive participation, and critical thinking skills.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified undergraduates may enroll with instructor's permission.

Quarter offered

Spring

METX 220 Biochemical Toxicology

Presents an in-depth treatment of the biochemical and physiological mechanisms underlying toxicity and detoxication. Topics include chemical-biological interactions, receptor dynamics, multicompartment kinetics, chemical activation and detoxication, induction and inhibition, and the toxic biochemical and physiological mechanisms of both natural and anthropogenic toxins.

Credits

5

MUSC 20 Introduction to Music Composition

Instruction in the basics of musical composition including the fundamentals of classical melodic and harmonic construction. Some experience in reading music, performance, and theory expected.

Credits

5

MUSC 30L Theory, Literature, and Musicianship I Laboratory

Keyboard (score-reading, figured-bass, progressions, chorales) and musicianship (sight-singing, intervals, chords, rhythm) laboratory sequence illustrating topics covered in course 30A. Two 1-hour laboratory sessions per week. Concurrent enrollment in course 60 required for students without adequate prior keyboard training.

Credits

2

Instructor

Hi Kim

Quarter offered

Fall

MUSC 30M Theory, Literature, and Musicianship I Laboratory

Keyboard (score-reading, figured-bass, progressions, chorales) and musicianship (sight-singing, single chords and progressions, rhythm) laboratory sequence illustrating topics covered in course 30B. Two 1-hour laboratory sessions per week. Prerequisite(s): course 30L.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

MUSC 30N Theory, Literature, and Musicianship I Laboratory

Keyboard (score-reading, figured-bass, progressions, chorales) and musicianship (sight-singing, atonal melody, rhythm) laboratory sequence illustrating topics covered in course 30C. Two 1-hour laboratory sessions per week. Prerequisite(s): course 30M.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Spring

MUSC 53 Basic Conducting

An introductory course in the art of conducting. Development of secure baton technique. Technical skills taught include standard and asymmetrical beat pattern, beat styles, fermata conducting, and use of the left hand.

Credits

2

MUSC 74 Beginning Jazz Improvisation

Introduction to the basics of jazz improvisation, including theory, harmony, rhythm, improvisation techniques, aesthetics and idiomatic devices. Exposure to jazz repertoire through in-class performances of swing, blues, modal and Latin styles. Admission by audition with instructor at first class meeting.

Credits

5

Instructor

Karlton Hester

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall

MUSC 80D Music of Indonesia

A detailed study of musical style in cultural context in Indonesia, including court and village traditions and recent developments. The comparative approach includes reference to Balinese, Javanese, and Sundanese music cultures, and traditions of other regions, such as Madura, Cirebon, and/or the outer islands. Performance in a related music culture is strongly recommended and may be satisfied by concurrent enrollment in course 5A, 5B, 5C, or 8, as available. Offered on a rotational basis with other non-Western music courses in the 80 series.

Credits

5

Instructor

Linda Burman-Hall

MUSC 81B Verdi in the Synagogue: Italian Culture and Jewish Music

Examination of blend of cultures permeating Italian Jewish experience as reflected in music from Renaissance to present: European and Mediterranean Jewish traits, Italian folk and art music, including opera. Course intersects musicology, ethnomusicology, and anthropology. Satisfies the Jewish studies and Italian studies concentrations. (Formerly course 80U.)

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

MUSC 100C Theory, Literature, and Musicianship II

Theories and practices of 20th-century music. Survey of compositional principles in 20th-century music, with an emphasis on departures from tradition. Techniques of post-tonal, dodecaphonic, and serial composition; survey of post-war movements in composition and improvisation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Paul Nauert, Dard Neuman

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MUSC 100B.

General Education Code

MF

Quarter offered

Spring

MUSC 101D History of Western Art Music

Fourth quarter of a four-quarter detailed chronological study of Western art music from antiquity to the present. Coordinated lectures, readings, listening assignments, and analysis of representative works: twentieth century.

Credits

5

Instructor

Amy Beal

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MUSC 30C and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements.

Quarter offered

Winter

MUSC 126 Technology ofthe Modern Music Studio

A survey of resources, electronic and acoustic theory, and construction techniques appropriate to the development and maintenance of a personal music or recording studio.

Credits

5

MUSC 130B Orchestration II

Idiomatic writing for solo instruments in the 20th century. Studies of 20th-century composers' transcriptions for orchestra of their own piano works. Timbre organization as the primary compositional structure in works by composers such as Varese, Stockhausen, and Ligeti.

Credits

5

MUSC 135 Counterpoint

Species counterpoint written and improvised to a given melody. Free counterpoint.

Credits

5

MUSC 140 Film Music Composition

Covers basic principles of film composition, terminology, general technology, and strategies for film scoring. Consists of discussions of particular film types, and students will compose music appropriate to the genre and mood of the film clips.

Credits

5

Instructor

David Cope

MUSC 141 Ethnomusicology

Designed to develop the background knowledge and technique necessary for graduate study and independent research in the field of ethnomusicology. Also useful to students in anthropology, theater arts, and related disciplines who are interested in the ethnomusicological approach.

Credits

5

MUSC 151 Operatic Literature and Performance

An intensive study of opera as both music literature and a vehicle for performance. Fundamentals of stage movement for singers. History, analysis, and staging of selected operatic scenes, culminating in one or more public performances. Offered concurrently with course 160 in years when there is a major opera production.

Credits

5

MUSC 159B Opera Workshop

A workshop for singers, accompanists, and directors, the course develops a wide variety of skills related to opera through scenework. Attention will be given to movement, acting, coaching, and operatic stage-directing technique. Instruction culminates in studio productions of scenes from operas and musicals. Admission by permission of vocal instructor, or by audition with instructor prior to first class meeting. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

3

Instructor

Brian Staufenbiel

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

MUSC 169 Advanced Conducting

Concentrates on developing advanced baton technique and effective rehearsal technique. Provides each student with practical experience through conducting a videotaped vocal lab. Other areas such as auditioning, building an ensemble, and score study are investigated.

Credits

2

MUSC 170 Gender Wayang Ensemble

Techniques and repertory of Gender Wayang, a traditional Balinese ensemble of metal-keyed percussion instruments. Works may include music for shadow plays and ritual pieces. Intermediate to advanced level skills in mallet percussion (individual lessons, gamelan, or percussion ensemble experience). Admission by audition with instructor at first class meeting. See the enrollment conditions section of the quarterly Schedule of Classes.

Credits

2

Instructor

Linda Burman-Hall

Repeatable for credit

Yes

MUSC 180N Seminar on Music of the Grateful Dead

Detailed study of the Grateful Dead's music, history, and sociology. Course 80N introduces the Dead to general students, but this course is for music majors or minors; non-majors who can read music; and Deadheads who have extensive touring/concert experience. Prerequisite(s): Course 11C (formerly 80H), or 80N, or equivalent experience. Admission by consent of instructor: personal interview before first class recommended. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and 80N in the same quarter.

Credits

5

Instructor

Fredric Lieberman

Quarter offered

Spring

MUSC 180V Seminar in the Music of the Beatles

Detailed study of the Beatles' music. While course 80V introduces the Beatles to general students, this course is designed for music majors, music minors, students able to read music, or non-majors with strong knowledge of the Beatles' repertory. Interview only; instructor determination at or before first class meeting. Prerequisite(s): course 11C or equivalent experience; basic knowledge of Beatles repertory. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and course 80V in the same quarter.

Credits

5

Instructor

Fredric Lieberman

MUSC 180W Seminar in Music Business

An exploration of the many facets of the music industry: history, technology, economics, sociology, and legislation. Intended to provide both a broad understanding of the industry and a pragmatic survey of available career paths. While designed for general students, this seminar is specifically directed to those students desiring to pursue a music business career, whether in performance, management, the record business, writing about music (journalism, criticism), or entertainment law. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and course 80W in the same quarter. Admission by permission of instructor at or before first class meeting.

Credits

5

Instructor

Fredric Lieberman

Quarter offered

Fall

MUSC 194F Continuity and Development in Stravinsky

Through musical analysis of representative works, an examination of stylistic continuity and development in Stravinsky, from the eclectic pre-Firebird pieces through Russian works of the 1910s, the neo-Classical compositions, the serial experiments, and the twelve-tone serialism of the final period.

Credits

5

OAKS 12 Marine Food Harvesting in Monterey Bay

Both seafoods and their harvesters are described in this class. Lectures present natural history of selected marine species, fishery perspectives (commercial, sport, and subsistence), and food safety issues. Students conduct projects related to subsistence seafood harvesting in Monterey Bay.

Credits

3

Quarter offered

Spring

OAKS 15 Bridge Academic Success Class

Assists first-year Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) Bridge students to successfully transition to the university and to maximize their academic success. Students identify their academic strengths and challenges, and use academic tools and strategies to become effective learners. Enrollment restricted to Bridge students only.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Fall

OAKS 85 Oakes Community Service

Provides an opportunity for students to do volunteer community service work in a public or private sector organization for six hours per week. Course work includes review of community service literature, skills development, oral presentations, and writing assignments.

Credits

3

Instructor

Thomas Casey

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

OAKS 155 Social Justice and the Rise of the Environmental Movement

Credits

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

OCEA 118L Marine Microbial Ecology Laboratory

Techniques for measurement of bacterial growth and metabolism, study of bacterial transformations in biogeochemical cycles, isolation of marine bacteria, and use of molecular biology to study environmental microbiology. Independent projects and field trips included. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 218L. Concurrent enrollment in course 118 or 218 is required. One laboratory course in chemistry or biology is recommended.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Spring

OCEA 130L Ocean Processes and Ecology Laboratory

This course will provide a laboratory and discussion component to course 130. Topics to be covered are chosen to demonstrate practical applications of the material learned in the lectures.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Fall

OCEA 142 Ocean Ecosystems

Discussion of selected topics in animal ecology of the open sea: zooplankton production, variability of pelagic populations, food webs, deep-sea pelagic and benthic ecology, fisheries oceanography, and human effects on the open ocean biota. Students cannot receive credit for this course and OCEA 242 or BIOE 267.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mary Silver

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, and BIOE 20C or equivalent; one ocean sciences course recommended.

Quarter offered

Winter

OCEA 142L Ocean Ecosystem Laboratory

A laboratory class designed for training students in selected techniques used for studying animal plankton, including laboratory experiments on zooplankton behavior and estimation of planktonic population sizes in Monterey Bay.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

OCEA 156 Marine Plankton

Review of morphology, systematics, and natural history of major marine planktonic taxa and evaluation of local plankton forms. Two lecture/lab sessions of three and one-half hours each, and two field trips during the quarter.

Credits

5

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in OCEA 156L is required; one of the following recommended as preparation: OCEA 118, OCEA 142, or OCEA 242; or BIOE 122 or BIOE 120. Recommended for upper-division and graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

OCEA 156L Marine Plankton Laboratory

Two lab meetings weekly. Concerned primarily with evaluation of local plankton forms.

Credits

2

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in OCEA 156 is required; one of the following recommended as preparation: OCEA 118 or BIOE 122 or BIOE 122.

Quarter offered

Spring

OCEA 181 Introduction to Marine Policy

Introduction to marine policy, its historical, legal, and socio-political foundations, and recent watershed events in state and federal policy. Explores implications through case studies of topics such as fishery management and marine-protected areas. Formerly course 80C.

Credits

5

Instructor

Caroline Pomeroy

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): at least one of OCEA 1, OCEA 80A, BIOL 80D, EART 1, or equivalent.

OCEA 218L Marine Microbial Ecology Laboratory

Techniques for measurement of bacterial growth and metabolism, study of bacterial transformations in biogeochemical cycles and use of molecular biology to study environmental microbiology. Independent projects required and field trips included. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 118L. Concurrent or prior enrollment in course 118 or 218 is required. One course in chemistry or biology recommended.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Spring

OCEA 230L Ocean Processes and Ecology Laboratory

Course will provide alaboratory and discussion component to complement course 230. Topics to be covered are chosen to demonstrate practical applications of the material learned in the lectures.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Fall

OCEA 242 Ocean Ecosystems

Discussion of selected topics in animal ecology of the open sea: zooplankton production, variability of pelagic populations, food webs, deep sea pelagic and benthic ecology, fisheries oceanography, and human effects on the open ocean biota. Students cannot receive credit for this course and OCEA 142 or BIOE 167.

Credits

5

Instructor

Mary Silver

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C, and BIOL 20L or an equivalent introductory biology sequence with lab; one ocean sciences course recommended. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

OCEA 242L Ocean Ecosystem Laboratory

A laboratory class designed for training students in selected techniques used for studying animal plankton, including laboratory experiments on zooplankton behavior and estimation of planktonic population sizes in Monterey Bay.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

OCEA 281B Sensory Ecology of Aquatic Animals

Weekly readings and discussions of research relating to aquatic animal sensory systems. Topics covered will be physics of sound, light, and chemical reception; evolution of sensory systems and the comparative method; signaling and communicative behavior; foraging; and navigation. Emphasis on experimental and observational approaches.

Credits

5

OCEA 294L Ocean Ecology Laboratory

Provides hands-on introduction to laboratory and field applications of ocean ecology. Designed to augment lecture material from courses 218, 230, and 242; but this class is self-contained. Includes independent projects and field trips.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jonathan Zehr

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): OCEA 218, OCEA 230, AND OCEA 242 or equivalent recommended. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students or by permission of the instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

PHIL 21 Wilderness Studies

Through the writings of Abbey, Peacock, and others, attempts to understand the interaction of human beings and the wilderness—especially as this interaction has developed in the U.S. Concern to understand the spiritual conditions under which this interaction might become less destructive to non-human organisms and ecosystems.

Credits

5

PHIL 80R Introduction to Philosophy of Biology

Introduction to core philosophical issues in the biological sciences. Covers such conceptual issues as the nature of evolutionary theory; choosing the unit of selection; the relationship between evolution and development; whether all biological phenomena are reducible to genes; and the definition of adaptions, and how to identify them.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

BIOL 80R

PHIL 80T Introduction to Feminist Philosophy

A survey of key authors, texts, and issues constituting recent feminist philosophy. Authors such as Wollstonecraft, Beauvoir, Firestone, and Gilligan provide a background for more contemporary feminist explorations of rights, justice, autonomy, and responsibility. Questions about the relation of mind and body, emotions and belief, knowledge and situation, self and identity are also explored from various feminist perspectives.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jocelyn Hoy

PHIL 102 Medieval Philosophy from Augustine to Ockham

Survey of medieval thought with special emphasis upon the two leading philosophers of that age: St. Augustine and St. Thomas of Aquinas. Course 101 is strongly recommended prior to taking this course.

Credits

5

PHIL 109 Poststructuralism and After

The three major poststructuralist philosophers are Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, and Gilles Deleuze. After studying their rejection of phenomenological accounts of consciousness and agency—as well as their program for studying power, bio-power, multiplicity, difference, and repetition,—current critics , such as Slavoj Zizek and Judith Butler, are also read for contrast between the methods of phenomenology, genealogy, and critical theory.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 24; PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

Quarter offered

Spring

PHIL 110 Heidegger

A close study of early and late texts by Martin Heidegger, especially Being and Time.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): course 9; and course 11 or 22 or 24; and course 100A or 100B or 100C; and course 106 or 107 or 108 or 109 or 111.

Quarter offered

Fall

PHIL 120 Philosophical Writing

Training in philosophical thinking and its expression in written form.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C; and satisfaction of Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to philosophy majors.

PHIL 131 Philosophy of the Self

Self, Self-Deception, Self and Other: Exploration of selected problems in philosophical psychology (e.g., personal identity, disembodied minds, bad faith, private languages) through readings in modern and contemporary philosophy and psychology.

Credits

5

PHIL 137 Practical Rationality

Examines challenges to what has been a dominant understanding of practical rationality: the claim that reason can never guide action in itself; that acting against one's better judgment is necessarily irrational; that emotions disrupt rather than facilitate practical reasoning.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 24; PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

Quarter offered

Winter

PHIL 145 Brave New World: Ethical Issues in Genetics

Study of ethical issues involved in recent and upcoming advances in genetic research and technology such as genetic engineering, cloning, human embryo research, genetic experimentation, use of an individual's genetic information, and the manipulation of human evolution. Also discusses fundamental issues such as the moral responsibility of scientists, our obligations to future generations, and the notion of human perfectability.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 150 Moral Aspects of Decision Making

How should you act when any course of action would contradict the rules of morality? This situation is the question of dirty hands. It is connected to the doctrine of double effect: the claim that although willing evil as a means to some good result is always wrong, it is permissible to cause evil as a side effect while aiming at a good result. Discussions include practical issues, such as democracy's combat against terrorism; and theoretical issues, such as the difference between action and omission, and the connection between goodwill and good (or bad) results.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C; or consent of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

PHIL 151 Modern Theories of Justice

Questions of social and distributive justice are as ancient as Aristotle; yet, modern philosophy, with its developing notions of democracy and quality, has added much sophistication and subtlety to these questions, especially since the publication of John Rawls' A Theory of Justice (1971). Issues discussed include: personal relations, concept of community, the notion of the State, and global justice.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C; or consent of instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

PHIL 154 Philosophy in Literature

Story, drama, and poetry considered as sources of philosophical perspective or as particular challenges to philosophical interpretation. Also, discussion of literary and imaginative elements in philosophical writing. One course in philosophy is strongly recommended prior to taking this course.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

PHIL 170 The Interpretation of Religion

A study of different philosophical responses to religious belief and practice, from the classical proofs of religion, to skeptical critiques of religious experience, to conceptual issues in the interpretation of religious texts.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; and PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 24; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

Quarter offered

Spring

PHIL 176 Indian Philosophy

An intensive study of the thirteen principal Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita with a view to understanding their philosophic-religious content.

Credits

5

PHIL 178 Ancient Chinese Philosophy

A study of Confucian and Daoist responses to the questions of how to restore order to society and how to conduct oneself at the individual level in the wake of breakdown of traditional norms and values in ancient China.

Credits

5

PHIL 180A Consciousness

Topic is the nature of consciousness. Two recent theories by analytic philosophers of mind are discussed for their answers to the questions of why living beings become conscious, and what defines consciousness.

Credits

3

PHIL 180F Insults and Intentions

What kind of injury is an insult? Is its infliction determined by the insulter or the insulted? What does it reveal of the character of each? What is its role in social and legal life (from play to jokes to ritual to war, and from defamation to fighting words to harassment)? Philosophical, anthropological, psychoanalytic, and legal approaches to the questions are emphasized.

Credits

3

PHIL 201 First Quarter Seminar

First quarter required course for philosophy graduate students. Introduces the work of the philosophy faculty members to the new graduate students. Helps new students form a cohort. Each week different faculty members will visit the class and discuss materials of their own as well as materials or topics that they study.

Credits

5

Instructor

Paul Roth

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to philosophy graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

PHIL 219 Intermediate Logic

Natural deduction and semantics of first order predicate logic. Metatheory, including completeness theorems for propositional and predicate logic.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

PHYE 25D Fencing: Intermediate Sabre

Coeducational. Instruction and practice in intermediate offensive and defensive skills of modern Hungarian sabre technique. Emphasis on physical and mental conditioning. Preparation for recreational competitive involvement. Students pay a course fee.

Credits

0

Instructor

Courtney Blackburn

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHYE 28J Field Sports: Rugby Football

Coeducational. Instruction and drills for persons with little or no playing experience. Course covers physical conditioning, basic fundamentals, rules, strategy, and preparatory development for sports clubs.

Credits

0

Quarter offered

Fall

PHYE 30B Fitness Activities: Triathlon I

Coeducational. Designed to help understand and improve swimming/bicycling/running techniques, strategies, safety, and fitness for triathlon participation. Emphasis is on developing knowledge of and appreciation for the competitive aspects of the sport.

Credits

0

Quarter offered

Spring

PHYE 50 Personal Fitness and Wellness

Designed to improve the overall health of each participant. Course material will touch on all the major components of wellness: physical, emotional, social, spiritual, and intellectual health. Topics include cardiovascular training, strength training, flexibility, fitness testing, stress reduction, nutrition, and recreation.

Credits

0

Instructor

The Staff, Ryan Andrews, Cynthia Mori, Danielle Lewis

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PHYS 3 Concepts of Modern Physics

Addressed to majors in non-science disciplines. Topics in classical and modern physics with an emphasis on relativity and quantum mechanics. Concepts are stressed, but some calculational techniques are developed.

Credits

5

PHYS 5I Introduction to Physics Honors I

Weekly 90-minute section covering advanced and modern topics. Topics may include the theory of relativity; complicated dynamics (air resistance, planetary dynamics, etc.); fallacies in perpetual-motion machines; the Euler disk and unusual tops; elasticity of materials applied to structures.

Credits

2

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 5A is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

PHYS 5J Introduction to Physics Honors II

Weekly 90-minute section covering advanced and modern topics. Topics may include nonlinear oscillators and chaos; waves in deep water and inside the earth; redshift in astronomy; negative refractive index materials; photons and matter waves; holography; viscosity; and turbulence.

Credits

2

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 5B is required.

Quarter offered

Winter

PHYS 5K Introduction to Physics Honors III

Weekly 90-minute section covering advanced and modern topics. Topics may include atmospheric electricity; shielding; tensor polarization; alternative energy sources; semiconductor devices; particle accelerators and relativistic electrodynamics; Thomson scattering; digital and analog communication.

Credits

2

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 5C is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

PHYS 80C Cosmology and Culture

Introduction to scientific cosmology. Examination of cultural roles of creation myths and cosmologies; examples include Zunian, Mayan, and ancient, medieval, and modern Judeo-Christian cosmologies. Possible cultural and religious repercussions of Big Bang, Gaia, and other modern origin stories.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

CRWN 80C

Instructor

Joel Primack

PHYS 80N Nuclear Weapons and Arms Control

Technology of nuclear weapons systems, and attempts to counteract and control them. How bombs work; physical, biological, and ecological effects; delivery systems and strategic defense; proliferation and nuclear terrorism, arms control and verification. Emphasis on basic underlying science and order-of-magnitude calculations.

Credits

5

PHYS 80P Physics and Philosophy

Historical view of the development of physics and its relation to philosophy, with examples taken from mechanics, quantum mechanics, and relativity. Study of original sources from Descartes to Einstein is emphasized.

Credits

5

PHYS 80T Introduction to Technology

Basic natural science necessary for informed citizenship in the modern world: elementary physics, chemistry, and ecology of the earth; demography, agriculture, energy, resources; evolution of modern technology; technological concepts; frontiers in science and technology with emphasis on associated public issues.

Credits

5

PHYS 80V Light, Color, and Vision

Covers a variety of optical and visual phenomena including the nature of light, optical effects in the atmosphere, the camera and photography, simple optical instruments, the human eye and vision, binocular vision, color and color perception. A course in high school algebra is recommended prior to taking this course.

Credits

5

PHYS 108 Continuum Mechanics

Introduction to continuum mechanics. Stress and strain tensors. Equations of motion of elastic solids. Linear elasticity. Equations of motion of Newtonian fluids. Perfect and viscous fluids.

Credits

5

PHYS 109 Optics

Modern geometrical and physical optics: lenses, mirrors, and image formation; interference, coherence, diffraction, polarization, and Fourier optics.

Credits

5

PHYS 111 Nonlinear Dynamics

Course covers modern developments such as the concept of a strange attractor, the transitions to chaos and the theory of solitons; along with more traditional subjects, e.g., nonlinear oscillators, nonintegrable hamiltonian systems and bifurcation theory. Analytic and numerical approaches are both emphasized.

Credits

5

PHYS 152 Optoelectronics

The first half of the course covers the theory of optoelectronics including wave, electromagnetic, and photon optics, modulation of light by matter, and photons in semiconductors. The second half covers applications including displays, lasers, photodetectors, optical switches, fiber optics, and communication systems.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHYS 101B or PHYS 102; and PHYS 110A.

PHYS 167 Introduction to Dynamical Oceanography

An introduction to the dynamics of the ocean. Topics include: introduction to ocean physics and geophysical fluid dynamics, geostrophic flow, general circulation of the ocean, numerical circulation models, surface waves, internal waves, and tides. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Marine Sciences 261.

Credits

5

PHYS 170 Atmospheric Dynamics

An introduction to the dynamics of the earth's and planetary atmospheres. Equations of motion for rotating systems. Scale analysis. Thermodynamics. Planetary boundary layer. Waves and instabilities. The general circulation. Numerical modeling. Predictability. Dynamics of atmospheres of other planets. Designed for beginning graduate students in marine sciences and upper-division science majors. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Marine Sciences 270. Students who have completed course 5C instead of course 6C may enroll in this course with permission of the board office.

Credits

5

PHYS 200M Fundamentals of Accelerator Physics and Technology

Offered in winter 2010 in conjunction with the United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS).

Credits

4

Quarter offered

Winter

PHYS 200N Intermediate Accelerator Physics and Beam Measurement

Offered in winter 2010 in conjunction with the United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS).

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

PHYS 211 Advanced Topics in Classical Mechanics

A special topics course that includes some of the following: nonlinear dynamics, continuum mechanics, recent developments in the theory of fluids, transition to chaos, turbulence.

Credits

5

PHYS 212B Electromagnetic Fields in Vacuum and Matter

ELECTROMAGNET FIELD

Credits

5

PHYS 292B Seminar

Provides an introduction to superstring theory, with the goal of making students familiar with recent developments, particularly string-string and strong-weak coupling quality.

Credits

0

POLI 10 Nationalism

Surveys contemporary academic approaches to the study of nationalism and writings of nationalist theorists from the 18th through 20th centuries. A few historical cases are considered.

Credits

5

Instructor

Megan Thomas

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Fall

POLI 104 Gender, Peace, and Security

Introduces the gendered dimensions of war and its aftermath. Explores what gender might teach us about security and the dynamics of war and peace with a particular focus on the everyday and on the roles and experiences of women.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to politics and Latin American and Latino studies/politics combined majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

POLI 105D Late 20th Century Political Thought

Credits

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to politics and Latin American and Latino studies/politics combined majors during priority enrollment.

POLI 106 Marxism as a Method

Examines Marx's use of his sources in political philosophy and political economy to develop a method for analyzing the variable ways in which social change is experienced as a basis for social action. Provides a similar analysis of contemporary materials. Contrasts and compares Marxian critiques of these materials and readings based on Nietzsche, psychoanalysis, cultural studies, and rational choice materialism.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

LGST 106

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to politics and Latin American and Latino studies/politics combined majors during first and second pass enrollment only.

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

POLI 107 Politics of Aesthetics

Introduces a variety of critical and aesthetic theories and various ways in which aesthetics are mobilized politically. Students are challenged to consider the politics of aesthetics as well as the aesthetics of politics both theoretically and historically. Enrollment restricted to sophomore, junior, and senior art, critical race and ethnic studies, feminist studies, history of art and visual culture, history, legal studies, philosophy, and politics majors.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): POLI 105B or POLI 105C.

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Spring

POLI 109 Orientalism

Studies Orientalism as a concept of political theory and as a historical practice. Considers how Western views of the peoples, cultures, and governments of 'the East influenced political, intellectual, and aesthetic projects of the 18th and 19th centuries, with attention to the themes of colonialism, nationalism, language, and gender. Also considers Orientalism as a subject of post-colonial thought.

Credits

5

Instructor

Megan Thomas

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): POLI 105A, or POLI 105B, or POLI 105C, or POLI 105D; or by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to politics majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

POLI 119 Queer Futures: Queer Theory and Politics in the United States

Explores the evolution of queer theorizing and politics in the United States from Stonewall to the present day. Examines the changing definition of queer identity; the intersection of race, class, and sexuality in the modern gay rights movement; and the rifts within the queer community. Draws from political theory, autobiography, literature, film, and law.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Summer

POLI 123 Parties and Elections in American Political Development

Credits

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to sophomore, junior, and senior legal studies, politics, and Latin American and Latino studies/politics combined majors during priority enrollment.

POLI 171 Law of War

Examines legal regulation of international violent conflict. Students examine development of normative standards within international law and creation of institutions to both adjudicate violations and regulate conduct.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

LGST 171

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to politics and Latin American and Latino studies/politics combined majors during first and second pass enrollment.

Quarter offered

Spring

POLI 183 Asian Security

Credits

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to politics and Latin American and Latino studies/politics combined majors during priority enrollment.

POLI 190U Global Climate Change Politics

Credits

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to senior politics and Latin American and Latino studies/politics combined majors.

POLI 212 Democratic Agency: Embodiment, Language, Precarity

Explores agency in contexts marked by co-action and conflict, interrogating agency's historical dimensions (conceptual and intrinsic), attribution to collective or ecosystemic actors, affective aspects, and relation to democracy and economy. Explores classic texts in political thought, as well as Taylor, Foucault, Butler, and Ranciere.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dean Mathiowetz

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

POLI 265 Nationalism

Survey of theories of nationalism, with selected nationalist thinkers and case studies. Emphasis on historical analyses and cases. Topics include: origins and typologies of nationalisms, racism, gender, revolution, and the state.

Credits

5

Instructor

Megan Thomas

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

PORT 1A Accelerated Portuguese

This course is the first quarter of an accelerated two-quarter series (1A-B), which, taken together, are equivalent to first-year instruction. This intensive class requires no background in the Romance languages, and emphasizes all language skills, including cultural competence. (Formerly Intensive Elementary Portuguese.)

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

PORT 1B Accelerated Portuguese

This course is sequential to course 1A, and completes first-year accelerated instruction. This intensive class is designed for students with no background in the Romance languages, and emphasizes all language skills, including cultural competence. (Formerly Intensive Elementary Portuguese.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PORT 1A, or by consent of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter

PORT 60A Accelerated Portuguese for Speakers of Romance Languages

The first quarter of accelerated first-year instruction (60A-B). Designed for students with four quarters of college-level Spanish, French, Italian, or Catalan, and native speakers of these Romance languages (including heritage speakers of Portuguese). Emphasizes all language skills, including cultural competence. (Formerly Advanced Beginning and Intermediate Portuguese.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 4 or SPHS 4 or SPHS 61 or FREN 4 or ITAL 4 or Spanish Placement Examination score of 50 or by consent of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

PORT 60B Accelerated Portuguese for Speakers of Romance Languages

The second quarter of the 60A-B series completes first-year accelerated instruction of Portuguese for speakers of Spanish, French, Italian, or Catalan, and native speakers of these Romance languages (including heritage speakers of Portuguese). Emphasizes all language skills, including cultural competence. (Formerly Advanced Beginning and Intermediate Portuguese.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PORT 60A, or by consent of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter

PSYC 41 Psychology of Women

Explores contemporary theories, findings, and social issues regarding the psychology of women. Emphasis is placed on understanding how gender role socialization influences women's beliefs and behaviors across the lifespan. Topics include achievement, intimate relationships, motherhood, mental health, violence against women, and empowerment. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 140G.

Credits

5

Instructor

Veronica Tonay

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

PSYC 80B Human Sexuality

A study of human sexuality emphasizing its psychological aspects. Sexual development, sexual orientations, biological influences, sexual attitudes and behavior, gender and gender roles, sex therapy, sexual coercion and abuse, sexually transmitted diseases, and the development of sexual relationships.

Credits

5

Instructor

Veronica Tonay

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

PSYC 80E Language, Communication, and Gender

Explores how gender is negotiated and defined through verbal and nonverbal forms of communication. Topics include sexism in language, images of gender in the media, the socialization of gender through language, gender bias in schools, gender-related variations in communication, and dominance and equality in relationships.

Credits

5

PSYC 103L Language Development Laboratory

Students gain familiarity with transcription and analysis of child language data. Concurrent enrollment in course 103 is required.

Credits

1

PSYC 109 Issues of Diversity in Developmental Psychology

Examines current issues of diversity from the perspective of theory and current empirical research in developmental psychology and related fields. Emphasis is on understanding children and families from increasingly diverse cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic backgrounds, both rural and urban, by examining social, cultural, and psychological processes underlying their development. (Formerly course 100G.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 10 and PSYC 100.

PSYC 110 Culture and Human Development

Examines theory, research, and methods of studying the inherent cultural basis of human development and variations and similarities in human lives and activities in different communities worldwide. The approach draws on ideas and observations from psychology, anthropology, linguistics, sociology, and history. Course includes lab exercises using interview and observation methodologies and presentations of library research. (Formerly course 113.)

Credits

6

Instructor

Barbara Rogoff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of Entry Level Writing, Composition requirements; PSYC 100, or ANTH 1 or ANTH 2, or EDUC 92A, or EDUC 92B, or EDUC 92C, or LALS 1, or SOCY 1. Enrollment is restricted to seniors or by permission.

Quarter offered

Winter

PSYC 119B Cultural Psychology

Critically analyzes relations among culture, ethnicity, identity, and the nation-state in a world characterized by globalization, migration, and social change. Examines the relevance of these features for the development of children and youth through examples from both Western and non-Western cultures. Satisfies the seminar requirement. Satisfies the senior comprehensive requirement.

Credits

5

Instructor

Per Gjerde

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 10, and PSYC 100; and satisfaction of Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to senior psychology majors.

Quarter offered

Fall

PSYC 119C The Social Context of Children's Cognitive Development

Focuses on the contribution of cultural and social relationships (e.g., parent-child, peers, siblings) to cognitive development. Special emphasis on the mechanisms through which relationships influence cognition and the features of social interactions that promote and inhibit development. Satisfies the senior seminar requirement. Satisfies the senior comprehensive requirement (Formerly course 100C.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Margarita Azmitia

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements, PSYC 117 preferred. Enrollment is restricted to senior psychology majors or permission of instructor.

PSYC 119G Development of Thought and Language

Explores the dynamic interface between thought and language throughout development. Focuses on early expression and understanding of meaning in infants and young children and on analysis of everyday conversations and activities of children as a window on developing understandings of the world. Satisfies seminar requirement. Satisfies senior comprehensive requirement.

Credits

5

Instructor

Maureen Callanan

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enroll Enrollment is ment restricted to senior psychology and cognitive science majors.

PSYC 119J Current Topics in Personality and Developmental Psychology

Examines a special topic of current interest in personality and/or developmental psychology, such as attachment, self-images, self-narratives, motivation, longitudinal studies, systematic descriptions of contexts, and special topics in adolescence. Emphasizes conceptual and methodological issues. Satisfies seminar requirement. Satisfies senior comprehensive requirement. (Formerly course 115.)

Credits

5

Instructor

David Harrington

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 60. Enrollment is restricted to senior psychology majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

PSYC 119L Biological Foundations of Life Span Development

Focuses on the biological foundations of cognitive and social development in childhood, adolescence, and old age. Topics include theory of mind and autism, planning, problem-solving, and emotional regulation in adolescence, and cognitive growth and decline in old age. Satisfies the senior seminar requirement. Satisfies the comprehensive requirement.

Credits

5

Instructor

Margarita Azmitia

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to senior psychology majors.

Quarter offered

Fall

PSYC 120B Applied Cognitive Psychology

The application of the principles of cognitive experimental psychology to human performance in everyday situations. Focuses on perceptual problems, attention, motor behavior, studying for learning and memory, decision strategies, reading, multimedia, communication, and creative behavior.

Credits

5

PSYC 120C Cognitive Neuropsychology

Credits

PSYC 121L Perception Laboratory

Students carry out exercises and experiments demonstrating basic sensory processes in visual, auditory, and skin systems. Discussion of relationships between laboratory observations and lecture material of course 121. Concurrent enrollment in course 121 is optional.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Spring

PSYC 124L Psychology of Reading Laboratory

Introduction to computer-based approaches in studying the reading process. Discussion of relationships between laboratory exercises and demonstrations and lecture material of course 124. Concurrent enrollment in course 124 is required.

Credits

2

PSYC 126 Second Language Acquisition

Centers on second-language acquisition in preschool and school-age children, as well as adult second-language learning. Course satisfies seminar requirement.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

PSYC 126L Laboratory in Second-Language Research

This laboratory is a required part of course 126, Second-Language Acquisition. Students are expected to conduct research, formulating hypotheses, collecting and analyzing data, and writing up results. The intent is to give students a sense of what it is like to function as a second-language researcher. Concurrent enrollment in course 126 is required.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

PSYC 129L Human Learning and Memory Laboratory

Affords students the opportunity to work in teams to design and conduct small, independent research projects on human memory. Students present the results in class, and write an APA-style report. One two-hour session per week. Concurrent enrollment in course 129 is required.

Credits

2

PSYC 134 Technology Assisted Reading Acquisition

Students achieve an understanding of language and its acquisition. The course evaluates nativist and empiricist views, language comprehension and production, speech and reading, and technological influences in language acquisition and its use. Prerequisite(s): upper-division coursework in psychology, cognitive psychology, linguistics, engineering, or computer science.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dominic Massaro

General Education Code

PE-H

Quarter offered

Spring

PSYC 136 Decision Making and Problem Solving

Course goal is to support the development of reflective thought to provide students with a more complete set of skills (psychological literacy). Various problem-solving and decision-making scenarios will be presented and analyzed within the context of cognitive psychology. (Formerly course 139.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 139A Cognitive Laboratory

Advanced laboratory experience with research methods and phenomena in cognitive psychology. Satisfies the seminar requirement. Satisfies the comprehensive requirement.

Credits

5

Instructor

Benjamin Storm

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements and PSYC 100. Enrollment is restricted to senior psychology and cognitive science majors.

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

PSYC 140A Women's Lives in Context: Community Practicum

Provides link between course 140G and community organizations that work with women. Students complete internships with relevant agencies and participate in seminar meetings.

Credits

2

Instructor

Heather Bullock

Requirements

Concurrent enrollment in PSYC 140G required.

PSYC 140J Human Motivation

An introduction to psychological theories of human motivation, including both those focused on the self and those highlighting the effects of social settings. Applications of these theories to domains such as politics or sports will be discussed.

Credits

5

Instructor

Eileen Zurbriggen

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 40 and PSYC 100.

PSYC 140K Chicano Social Psychology

An exploration of the history and foundation of contemporary Chicano psychology. Examines Chicano psychology from its roots as a social movement to its present status as a sub-discipline of psychology. Major topics covered are identity, family, gender issues, language issues, education, and the media.

Credits

5

PSYC 143 Intergroup Relations

Introduces the study of conflict and intergroup relations. Examines historical and cultural foundations of group psychology and social psychological theory and research on conflict between groups, cultures, and nations. Surveys work on multiculturalism, race relations, and global political conflict. Applies social psychological theories to cases of intergroup conflict.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100, or major standing in politics, community studies or anthropology, or by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

PSYC 151 Advanced Experimental Social Psychology

Advanced seminar designed to provide a rigorous, in-depth analysis of basic issues in experimental social psychology. Topics include attitudes, social cognition, cognitive dissonance, person perception, and information integration. Course satisfies seminar requirement.

Credits

5

PSYC 152 Introduction to Survey Methods

Introduces students to all aspects of conducting survey research and exposes students to the most current issues involved in interview surveys. Covers survey design, questionnaire construction, sampling, coding, interviewing, analysis, and report writing. Students develop a survey to integrate their learning into practical application.

Credits

5

PSYC 153A Psychology of Poverty and Social Class Community Practicum

Provides a link between course 153 and community organizations with an antipoverty mission. Students complete internships with nonprofit agencies and participate in seminar meetings.

Credits

2

Instructor

Heather Bullock

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): concurrent enrollment in PSYC 153.

Quarter offered

Winter

PSYC 157 Chicana Feminism

Students are introduced to the writings of Chicana feminists to identify the gender issues that produce conflict and cooperation in their communities. The course also makes linkages to gender issues in other U.S. communities of color and Latin America.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 151A

Instructor

Aida Hurtado

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or FMST 1.

Quarter offered

Fall

PSYC 158 Latinos in the Media

Introduces portrayals of Latinos in the U.S. media including magazines, film, and television. Covers the most recent social psychological research on media representations and implications for identity.

Credits

5

Instructor

Aida Hurtado

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or LALS 1.

Quarter offered

Winter

PSYC 158L Latinos in the Media Laboratory

Introduces examples of portrayals of Latinos in the media, and students are taught how to conduct research using these materials. Concurrent enrollment in course 158 is required.

Credits

2

PSYC 159B Research Seminar in Crime and Media

Empirically examines several aspects of the criminal justice system (in particular, jury decision making and media effects on juror fairness and impartiality). In addition to extensive reading, students participate in research projects. Satisfies seminar requirement. Satisfies senior comprehensive requirement.

Credits

5

Instructor

Craig Haney

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 147A and PSYC 147B; or LGST 147A and LGST 147B; or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 147B or LGST 147B. Enrollment is restricted to senior psychology and legal studies majors.

PSYC 159C Social Issues Research

Reviews contemporary social issues research. Emphasizes understanding how researchers study social problems and how theory and research can contribute to social change. Examines intersections of psychology and social policy. Satisfies seminar requirement. Satisfies senior comprehensive requirement.

Credits

5

Instructor

Heather Bullock

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to senior psychology majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

PSYC 159F Culture and Identity

Considers the relationship between culture and identity in the local context of multiculturalism in the United Sates and the global context of conflict and identity politics. Examines concept of culture, ethnicity, race, and identity in social science literature. Considers issues of power, social justice, and identity pluralism in both domestic and international contexts. Satisfies the senior seminar requirement. Satisfies the senior comprehensive requirement.

Credits

5

Instructor

Phillip Hammack

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements and PSYC 100. Enrollment is restricted to senior psychology majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

PSYC 159K Advanced Topics in Chicana Feminism

Course is a continuation of course 151A which introduces students to the writings of Chicana feminists to identify the gender issues that cause conflict and cooperation in their communities. The seminar format allows students an opportunity for extensive discussion.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 151B

Instructor

Aida Hurtado

Requirements

Satisfies senior requirements. Satisfies senior comprehensive requirement. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1, or PSYC 40, or PSYC 157, or FMST 1, or FMST 100, or FMST 151A, or consent of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

PSYC 159M Transnational Feminism

Reviews and discusses scholarship that takes into account women's role in development and how access to resources impacts the structures that perpetuate gender inequalities. Uses a transnational gendered lens to evaluate the impacts of globalization on women's well-being and ways alternative development can alter structural inequities and transform the conditions in which women can confront aspects of their subordination, thereby impacting their psychological well-being. Satisfies senior seminar and senior comprehensive requirements.

Credits

5

Instructor

Shelly Grabe

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to senior psychology majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

PSYC 159T Small Groups

Course strives toward three goals of varying specificity: knowledge of the psychological literature on small groups, aspects of group functioning, and what theorists have found in group studies; effectiveness in group settings; and behavior in group settings. Students required to set aside one weekend for lab work. Satisfies the seminar requirement. Satisfies the senior comprehensive requirement.

Credits

5

Instructor

Faye Crosby

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 40. Enrollment is restricted to senior psychology majors.

Quarter offered

Fall

PSYC 160 Laboratory in Creativity Research

Selected cognitive and personality processes associated with creativity by means of systematic observations, interviews, and/or controlled studies undertaken on a group or individual basis.

Credits

5

PSYC 161 Fostering Creativity

Examines theories, research, and practices that suggest ways creativity can be fostered in the arts and sciences as well as in business, education, social action, and everyday life. Focuses on special topics of personal interest to students. Satisfies seminar requirement. Satisfies senior comprehensive requirement.

Credits

5

Instructor

David Harrington

Requirements

Prerequisite(s):PSYC 60 and PSYC 100.

Quarter offered

Winter

PSYC 162 The Psychology of Creativity

The study of creative people, processes, and places in the arts, literature, science, business, and education. Examines theories, systematic research, and case studies. Social roles, economic factors, child-rearing practices, and educational methods which may influence creativity are also studied. (Formerly course 162A.)

Credits

5

Instructor

David Harrington

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100; PSYC 60 is recommended as preparation.

PSYC 162B Special Topics in Creativity

Examines selected topics in creativity which are of particular interest to seminar members. Topics will be explored in greater depth and from more perspectives than in course 162A. Satisfies seminar requirement. Satisfies senior comprehensive requirement.

Credits

5

Instructor

David Harrington

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 162A. Enrollment is restricted to psychology majors.

PSYC 162L The Psychology of Creativity Laboratory

Students have opportunities to examine, explore and experience a variety of assessment techniques and research methods used in the study of creative people, processes, and environments. Course meets one hour per week to accompany course 162. Enrollment is optional and limited to students who are concurrently enrolled in course 162,

Credits

1

PSYC 164 Current Topics in Personality Psychology

Explores a single topic of current interest in personality psychology, such as resilience, attachment, motivation, self-narratives, self-concept, longitudinal studies, or cross-cultural perspectives. Examines relevant theories, research, and practical applications. Active student participation is required. Satisfies seminar requirement. Satisfies senior comprehensive requirement.

Credits

5

Instructor

David Harrington

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 60 and PSYC 100. Enrollment is restricted to psychology or prepsychology majors.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

PSYC 169A Practicum in Community Psychology

Students are placed in a community service agency which offers the opportunity for applying theory and research from course 169. Practicum includes supervision, discussion, problem-solving, and further understanding of community issues reflected in human care services. (Formerly a 2 credit course; now a 5 credit course.)

Credits

5

PSYC 173 The Psychology of Conflict and Its Resolution

An intensive exploration of the nature of conflict in human interactions and of the various approaches developed for managing and resolving it. Particular focus upon mediation as a most promising approach.

Credits

5

PSYC 179C Topics in Human Motivation

Examines theories of human motivation from perspectives provided by personality, developmental, educational, organizational, cross-cultural and evolutionary psychology. Also examines methods used to measure and study motivational tendencies and processes. Active seminar participation is required. Course satisfies seminar requirement. Satisfies the senior seminar requirement. Satisfies the senior comprehensive requirement. (Formerly course 174.)

Credits

5

Instructor

David Harrington

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to senior psychology majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

PSYC 190A Psychoanalysis and Art

A study of the discovery of unconscious motives and symbols which opened up new avenues of understanding artists and their art; a review of empirical methods for testing hypotheses derived from theory. Examination of case studies of individual artists.

Credits

5

PSYC 120C Cognitive Neuropsychology

Credits

PSYC 208 Topics in Quantitative Psychology: Meta-Analysis

Focuses on the process of quantitative research synthesis (meta-analysis). Topics include: literature search; coding; effect-size calculation; fixed- and mixed- and random-effects models for effecting size; special problems in meta-analysis.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jack Vevea

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to psychology graduate students; senior psychology majors may enroll with permission of instructor.

PSYC 209 Advanced Statistical Methods in Psychology

Statistical methods for challenging problems in psychological research. Topic changes each time the course is offered. Topics include: item response theory, hierarchical modeling, longitudinal analysis, analysis of categorical data.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jack Vevea

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 204 or permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

PSYC 216 Social Cognition

Investigates how people think about the social world. Topics include social categorization, person perception and memory, and social judgment. Offered in alternate academic years.

Credits

5

PSYC 217 Technology Benefiting Humanity

Goal is to understand how people interact with the natural world and how technology benefits this interaction.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dominic Massaro

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

PSYC 218 Speech Perception and Reading

An information-processing analysis of speech perception and reading. The stages of information processing in understanding language are studied, with particular emphasis on pattern recognition processes, memory processes, and utilization of context and knowledge in speech perception and reading.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dominic Massaro

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduatestudents.

Quarter offered

Spring

PSYC 223 Special Topics in Psychological Inquiry

Special topics in psychology and cognitive science are examined in a seminar format. Focus is on global issues of methodological and theoretical approaches.

Credits

5

PSYC 226 Second Language Research

Deals with second-language research; reviews the recent history of the field and discusses current literature. Focus is on research design and methodology, as well as on the theories that have evolved in this field.

Credits

5

PSYC 228 Topics in Visual Sensory Processing

A detailed consideration of selected topics on the visual system.

Credits

5

PSYC 236 Paradigms of Culture

Integrative seminar on the relationship between individual psychological experience and its social, cultural, and institutional context. Explores various paradigms of culture in social science literature, including psychoanalytic theory, culture and personality, cultural psychology, Marxism, symbolic interactionism, poststructuralism, postcolonial theory, narrative, and Vygotsky's sociocultural theory. (Formerly Person, Culture, Society.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Phillip Hammack

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

PSYC 237 Forensic Psychology

The application of clinical and social psychological concepts and assessment techniques to the criminal justice system. Topics include insanity, competency, dangerousness, sentencing, incarceration, recidivism, and the role of psychologists in legal decision-making. Offered in alternate academic years.

Credits

5

PSYC 241 Attitudes and Attitude Change

Throughout the history of social psychology, attitude has been one of social psychology's major theoretical constructs, and persuasion has been one of it's perennial high-activity areas of empirical research. Discusses a range of contemporary issues in the study of attitudes and attitude change.

Credits

5

PSYC 243 Theories in Developmental Psychology

A survey of contemporary and historical developmental theories, with special attention to their assumptions, philosophical roots, empirical underpinnings, and positions on major developmental issues.

Credits

5

PSYC 259 Social Psychology of Justice

Looks at theories of distributive, procedural, and retributive justice; seeks universal justice norms (e.g., reciprocity); and critically examines the rules of evidence and inference guiding psychological findings. Emphasis on student participation and research.

Credits

5

Instructor

Faye Crosby

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to psychology graduate students; undergraduates planning graduate work in social psychology may enroll with permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring

PSYC 260 Personality Development

An examination of enduring and contemporary issues in the study of personality development over the lifespan. Emphasis on issues involved in conceptualizing and measuring individual differences and in understanding their sources and significance.

Credits

5

PSYC 262 Creativity: An Interdisciplinary View

Examines human creativity from a variety of perspectives, including those of developmental, social, cognitive, personality, organizational, and educational psychology. Explores multiple disciplinary perspectives and their possible integration.

Credits

5

PSYC 280 History of Ideas in Modern Psychology

An analysis of the development of the main approaches in contemporary psychology, with an emphasis on the history of ideas.

Credits

5

PSYC 290A Proseminar: The Psychology of Education

The psychological underpinnings of schooling. Applies fundamental psychological principles and findings to the educational process. Relevant topics include the psychology of learning, memory, attention, thinking, problem solving, computer-assisted instruction, and motivation, as well as specific domains of application of these areas.

Credits

5

PSYC 290F American Race Relations

Reviews the 20th-century history of social research on American black-white relations. Provides an overview of current theory and research. Focuses on social psychological contributions. Features extensive readings, seminar discussions and presentations, and a final substantive paper.

Credits

5

PSYC 290G Teaching Psychology

Explores the philosophy and pragmatics of teaching psychology at a college/university level. Students read various articles on contemporary teaching methods in psychology and engage in various exercises to develop their teaching skills.

Credits

5

RUSS 4 Second-Year Russian

Second-year courses designed to improve functional competence in speaking, listening, reading, and writing by activating basic grammar covered in introductory courses. Grammatical explanations and exercises supplemented with short readings and films.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): RUSS 3 or by consent of instructor.

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Fall

RUSS 5 Second-Year Russian

Second-year courses designed to improve functional competence in speaking, listening, reading, and writing by activating basic grammar covered in introductory courses. Grammatical explanations and exercises supplemented with short readings and films.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): RUSS 4 or by consent of instructor.

General Education Code

CC

RUSS 6 Second-YearRussian

Second-year courses designed to improve functional competence in speaking, listening, reading, and writing by activating basic grammar covered in introductory courses. Grammatical explanations and exercises supplemented with short readings and films. (Formerly Intermediate Russian.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): RUSS 5 or by consent of instructor.

General Education Code

CC

RUSS 80 Russian Culture Through Film

Explores topics in Russia and the Russian-speaking world. Students view the country, its people, history, and traditions through the lens of cinematography. Conducted in English.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

CC

SCIC 15 Contemporary Science Fiction

Focuses on themes of contemporary science fiction and fantastic literature, concentrating on the short story form. Authors discussed in depth include Robert Heinlein, Theodore Sturgeon, Samuel Delany, Ursula LeGuin, Joanna Russ, James Tiptree Jr., Harlan Ellison, and William Gibson. Lectures and readings are supplemented with guest lectures by science fiction authors.

Credits

5

SCIC 106B Application of Science IllustrationTechniques

Presents intermediate techniques in black and white and color illustration, including ink wash, pencil on film and scratchboard, plus ongoing practice with pen and ink. Emphasis on conceptual illustration—how to convey an idea, process, sequence of events, etc., through visual means. Preparation of artwork for display and development of a personal portfolio is also covered. Appropriate for students with a demonstrated interest in science illustration through previous course work in science and art, or through extracurricular activity in the field, or a strong desire to learn the skills of the field. Enrollment process differs for Summer Session.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Winter

SCIC 205 Science in Multimedia

Introduces students to the communication of science in multimedia on the World Wide Web. The aesthetics, effectiveness, current limitations, and future potential of multimedia for communicating science are considered. Students critically examine exemplary Web sites where science is presented. Using the latest commercially available software tools, students learn to create their own original multimedia productions and put them on the Web.

Credits

3

Quarter offered

Fall

SCIC 206 Science on the Radio

Introduces students to the communication of science through the medium of radio. The aesthetics, effectiveness, and limitations of radio as a medium for communicating science are considered. Students critically examine exemplary science radio programs and learn to conceive and criticize story ideas, as well as research, interview, record ambient sound, and write narration for radio reports. Using the latest commercially available technology, students report, write, record, edit, and produce for actual broadcast a finished radio program on a scientific subject.

Credits

3

Quarter offered

Fall

SOCD 220 Oral History

Introduction to the theory and practice of oral history. Seminar participants read foundational texts in oral history, historical memory, public history, and social documentary. Students conduct two oral-history interviews; write synthesis essays; and complete a seminar paper.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

SOCD 291 Media Laboratory for Social Documentation

Individual training in a social documentation medium under the guidance of a faculty supervisor. Course is intended to be taken concurrently with social documentation courses requiring a laboratory course.

Credits

2

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to social documentation and digital arts and new media graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

SOCY 80B AIDS and Society: Introduction to the Epidemic

Examines the impact of AIDS on contemporary society and the social forces shaping the HIV epidemic; the experience of people affected, both gay and straight; cultural and political dimensions of the AIDS crisis; the character of scientific and medical research on AIDS; action for prevention and care, in the U.S. and globally. Special attention to the impact of race, gender, and sexuality.

Credits

5

SOCY 80F Global Islam: Modernity, Politics, and Gender

An introduction to Islamic history, societies, and cultures. Evaluates the global Islamic revival, emergence of political Islam and its interaction with the globalization of economies, societies, and cultures. Topics include Islamic modernism, nationalism, American Islam, and media representations of Islam.

Credits

5

SOCY 80M Autobiographies and Social Life

Readings from life stories of ordinary workers reveal the changes shaping European societies in age of industrialization.

Credits

5

SOCY 80X Justice and Gender

Explores gender as a social construct with deep consequences for the concept of justice in the U.S. criminal justice system. Explores law, violence, crime, punishment, and criminal justice professions with particular focus on gender differences.

Credits

5

SOCY 99F Tutorial

Directed reading and research. Petitions may be obtained from the Sociology Department Office. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Ordinarily call numbers for this course are not issued after the first week of instruction.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

SOCY 110 Violence in the Family

Examines child abuse and neglect, wife abuse, and sexual abuse in the family, using gender as a lens through which to understand domestic violence. Using a variety of sources, the course undertakes to understand the social, political, and cultural forces that contribute to abuse and to consider solutions.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

SOCY 112 Economic Sociology

Introduction to economic sociology using field visits to key sites of production and consumption to investigate sociological ideas about the modern economy.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ben Crow

SOCY 113 Political Sociology

An intensive examination of major substantive monographs representing pluralist, elite, and class theories of the state in industrialized capitalist democracies.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

SOCY 138 Symbolic Interactionism

Covers the theory of symbolic interactionism and major works in that tradition (Blumer, Goffman, and others). Also explores theoretical and applied issues in fieldwork methods, particularly participant observation and interviewing.

Credits

5

SOCY 160T Comparative Industrial Society

Considers the contradictions of state economic and social policy in the U.S. and other modern capitalist societies, with an emphasis on the post World War II period; policies of the state with regard to accumulation vs. legitimation functions; and the key role of conflicts between capital and labor.

Credits

5

SOCY 168T Newly Industrializing States in World Economy

From a global political and economic perspective, the history and consequences of new industrializing states' emergence as regional political and economic powers. Theories of state intervention and globalization of economy and society are examined in the cases of Brazil, Mexico, Korea, and others. (Formerly course 168.)

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

SOCY 175 Social History of Asian Americans

Provides a general introduction to the history of Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, Koreans, and Southeast Asians, within the context of American history. Examines the diverse processes of immigration, the formation of communities, work, and family relations of Asians and Asian Americans. Looks at how social, political, and economic changes in the larger U.S. society have affected the lives of Asians in America. Offered in alternate academic years.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

American History and Institutions

Yes

SOCY 181 A Sociology of Place: The California Coast

Examines the California coast, including important social, political, cultural, and environmental aspects of this most important place. Lectures, readings, discussion, and class assignments examine the history, development, and future of the California coast.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Quarter offered

Spring

SOCY 183M Survey Research

An introduction to the methods of social research including problem formulation, research design, instrument construction, sampling design, data collection, codification, data processing, variable building, descriptive statistical analysis, and the reporting of research and analytical results.

Credits

5

SOCY 188 Religion and Social Change

Uses historical-comparative method to explore role of religion in global and local social movements. Case studies include historical analysis of the civil rights movement, Islamic movements, liberation theology, and millenarian movements. Topics vary annually. Recommended for social science and history majors.

Credits

5

Instructor

Paul Lubeck

SOCY 189 Gender and Development: Analysis and Practice

One of the greatest social transformations of our time arises from the struggle to address the almost universal (across space and time) subordination of women. For the majority of the world's population, this struggle takes place in the context of attempts to raise living standards. Examines case studies and key analytical texts, primarily relating to the Third World.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ben Crow

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

SOCY 191 Sociology Teaching Practicum

Under the supervision of the instructor, the student works with a group of students in a lower-division course, leading discussions, explaining material, reading and marking submissions, consulting individually and/or in other ways assisting in the teaching of a course. Interview and selection by professor required. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and excellent performance in core courses in the major. Enrollment restricted to senior sociology majors.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

SOCY 192 Directed Student Teaching

Teaching of a lower-division seminar under faculty supervision. (See course 42.) Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

SOCY 210B The Political Economy of the Welfare State

A critical survey of the major theoretical and empirical works on the origins, development, and impact of western welfare states. Marxist, state-centered, and electoral approaches considered; particular emphasis on the dynamics of social class, race, and gender in the growth and development of welfare states.

Credits

5

SOCY 221 International Migration

Provides a theoretical foundation for the study of international migration from a variety of perspectives relevant to sociological concerns. Examines the historical trends of migration waves and the factors which influence these movements. Students will read a variety of texts from different disciplinary and theoretical traditions including (but not limited to) neoclassical economics, world systems, transnational, post-colonial, and diasporic studies.

Credits

5

SOCY 226 Advanced Topics in Sociological Theory

In-depth reading of one or two key contemporary theorists or theoretical trends. Choice of theorists varies. Enrollment priority given to advanced graduate students.

Credits

5

SOCY 228 The State, Capitalism, and Democracy

Examines various explanations for the existence of the Modern State, starting with its rise in conjunction with the growth of industrial capitalism. Is the Modern State intrinsically a servant of economic interests or can it be responsive to a broader set of interests? Explores how various authors have attempted to answer that question, with the goal of envisioning state instutions that are truly democratic.

Credits

5

Instructor

E Du Puis

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

SOCY 243 Politics and Ideology

Explores the relationship between consciousness, ideology, and political behaviors from voting to rebellion. Special attention is given to the lived experience and the identity interests that complicate the nexus of class position and political ideology.

Credits

5

SOCY 248 Class and Cultural Studies

Examines theoretical and historical approaches to class and culture. In particular, focuses on how historical and ethnographic studies of class structure theorize different models of culture in the context of class formation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dana Takagi

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to sociology graduate students.

SOCY 250A Classic Socio Theor

Credits

5

SOCY 251 Sexualities

Provides a theoretical foundation and overview of scholarship in the sociology of sexualities. Emphasis is on significant primary sources of the 20th century which have shaped current discourse on normative and non-normative sexualities.

Credits

5

SOCY 254 Masculinities

Examines masculinity from a feminist theoretical perspective; problems and conflicts associated with modern male identities; and variety of experiences along social axes of class, race/ethnicity, sexuality, age, region, as well as gender.

Credits

5

SOCY 266 Health, Inequality, and Politics

Course focuses on sociology of health, illness, and medicine. Sociological approaches offer vital counterpoints to reductionist biomedical approaches. Medical sociology is a diverse field whose basic premise is that the nature, distribution, and meaning of health and illness are shaped by social, cultural, political, and economic factors.

Credits

5

SOCY 267 Sociology of Ethics

Explores ethics from a sociological perspective and reflects a broader critique leveled against traditional ethics by many social scientists. Reframes ethics as a set of concrete social practices that can be captured analytically, examining the social processes and judgments underlying what comes to count as an acceptable practice.

Credits

5

SPAN 1T Topic-Oriented Spanish Language Instruction (Special Track)

Prepares students to understand, speak, and write on topics (geography, nature, society, art, history, etc.) and to provide information about themselves and their surroundings. Emphasis on the development of proficiency in all language skills and the active use of Spanish through task-oriented activities. Multiple-term course; students receive 5 credits per course and receive credit for all three courses upon completion of course 3T.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Spanish Placement Examination score of 10.

Quarter offered

Fall

SPAN 1U Laboratory to Topic-Oriented Spanish Language Instruction

Consists of individualized instruction which allows students to work at their own pace developing their oral comprehension, reading comprehension, speaking and writing skills. Provides the supplementary exposure and practice students need in the acquisition of the target language. Multiple-term course; students receive credit for all three courses upon completion of course 3U. Prerequisite(s): interview only; Spanish Placement Examination score of 10.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Fall

SPAN 2T Topic-Oriented Spanish Language Instruction (Special Track)

Prepares students to understand, speak, and write on topics (geography, nature, society, art, history, etc.) and to provide information about themselves and their surroundings. Emphasis on the development of proficiency in all language skills and the active use of Spanish through task-oriented activities. Multiple-term course; students receive 5 credits per course and receive credit for all three courses upon completion of course 3T.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 1T.

Quarter offered

Winter

SPAN 2U Laboratory to Topic-Oriented Spanish Language Instruction

Consists of individualized instruction which allows students to work at their own pace developing their oral comprehension, reading comprehension, speaking and writing skills. Provides the supplementary exposure and practice students need in the acquisition of the target language. Multiple-term course; students receive credit for all three courses upon completion of course 3U. Prerequisite(s): interview only; course 1U.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Winter

SPAN 3T Topic-Oriented Spanish Language Instruction (Special Track)

Prepares students to understand, speak, and write on topics (geography, nature, society, art, history, etc.) and to provide information about themselves and their surroundings. Emphasis on the development of proficiency in all language skills and the active use of Spanish through task-oriented activities. Multiple-term course; students receive 5 credits per course and receive credit for all three courses upon completion of course 3T.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 2T.

Quarter offered

Spring

SPAN 3U Laboratory to Topic-Oriented Spanish Language Instruction

Consists of individualized instruction which allows students to work at their own pace developing their oral comprehension, reading comprehension, speaking and writing skills. Provides the supplementary exposure and practice students need in the acquisition of the target language. Multiple-term course; students receive credit for all three courses upon completion of course 3U. Prerequisite(s): interview only; course 2U.

Credits

2

Quarter offered

Spring

SPAN 156B The New Latin American Song

Latin American troubadours, and the relationship between music, ideology, and politics; folkloric music and popular song, song as oral history and chronicle, censorship, and other related topics. Songs from Violeta Parra, Victor Jara, Alfredo Zitarrosa, Chico Buarque, Silvio Rodriguez, and Atahualpa Yupanqui, and other participants or precursors of the movement are studied. Works are analyzed for their sociopolitical and cultural contexts.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Maria Gonzalez Pagani

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 6 or SPAN 56 or SPHS 6 or placement into Spanish 156B via the online Spanish Placement Examination.

Quarter offered

Spring

SPAN 156C Latin American Women's Voices

Overview of Latin American women's struggles to preserve their voice and of their active involvement in all aspects of contemporary life in Latin America. Deals with women's roles in the private and public spheres and touches on topics such a family, education, health, social class, ethnicity, religion, politics, legislation, labor force, and intellectual and artistic background from current research in these fields. Readings and discussion are in Spanish and supplemented with audio-visual material.

Credits

5

SPAN 156G Spanish for the Professions

Taught in Spanish. Students learn vocabulary and expressions as well as pertinent cultural background to understand, speak, read, and write about business and professional situations in connection with the Latino experience. Legal, educational, medical, and business topics are covered.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 6 or SPHS 6 or placement into Spanish 156G via the online Spanish Placement Examination.

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Spring

SPAN 195F Senior Essay

Concurrent enrollment in an approved upper-division Spanish, languages, or Spanish literature concentration course not used for core or concentration credit satisfies the capstone requirement. Students work with a faculty adviser to complete the senior capstone essay in addition to course requirements for the upper-division course. Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment restricted to Spanish studies majors only.

Credits

2

Instructor

The Staff

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

STAT 109 Generalized Linear Models

Reviews and extends ideas of multiple regression analysis to a wider class of models—Generalized Linear Models (GLMs)—involving the relationship between a response and one or more explanatory variables. Models for the analysis of quantitative and qualitative responses, including multiple regression, analysis of variance, covariance models, binomial models for binary responses (including logistic regression and probit models), and Poisson models for count data. Case studies drawn from social, engineering, and life sciences. (Formerly AMS 174.)

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): one of the following courses: STAT 5, STAT 7, STAT 131, STAT 108, CSE 107, or ECON 113.

Quarter offered

Winter

STAT 162 Design and Analysis of Computer Simulation Experiments

Methods for the design and analysis of computer simulation experiments: random number generation; estimation of sample size necessary to achieve desired precision goals; antithetic variables and other devices for increasing simulation efficiency; analysis of the output of large deterministic computer programs, exploring the sensitivity of outputs to changes in the inputs. Applications drawn mainly from engineering and environmental sciences. (Formerly AMS 162.)

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff, Herbert Lee

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): STAT 5 or STAT 7 or STAT 131 or CSE 107 or permission of instructor.

STEV 11A Experiential Leadership Program Core Course: Tools for Leadership and Conflict Resolution

Experiential Leadership Program certificate course where students gain skills and confidence to lead groups; develop a leadership mindset; build tools for communication, conflict resolution, and receiving feedback; cultivate an inclusive and welcoming environment. Course includes one-day high ropes adventure team-building field activity. Students are billed for a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Miranda Allen-Brower

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Fall

STEV 11B ELP Core Course: Leadership From the Inside Out, Networking and Professionalism

Skilled leadership isn't just what you do, it is who you are Explore temperament, character, and tools for self-reflection. Includes tools for networking, professionalism, goal-setting, and taking action. This Experiential Leadership Program Certificate course includes the Skyline to Sea team-building adventure hike. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Miranda Allen-Brower

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

STEV 11C ELP Core Course: Tone-Setting and Leading with Cultural/Emotional Intelligence

Gain tools to lead with awareness and the capacity to relate to and work across cultures, and to set structure, feelings, and purpose that support groups and teams. Experiential Leadership Program Certification course. Includes a one-day kayak field activity. No kayaking experience is necessary. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Miranda Allen-Brower

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Spring

STEV 12 ELP Elective Course: Risk Management and Social Justice Through the Lens of Outdoor Leadership

Gain leadership skills, confidence, and competence. Focus is on leading and teaching in a wilderness setting, wilderness risk management, exploring social justice in outdoor education, and cultivating a safe, inclusive environment. This Experiential Leadership Program Certificate course includes a weekend backpack trip. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Miranda Allen-Brower

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

STEV 13 Leadership Spring Break Intensive: Backpacking the Canyons of Southern Utah

This 10-day expedition through red rock canyons at Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument focuses on working effectively in teams, cultivating an inclusive environment, leadership development, good expedition behavior, Leave-No-Trace practices, and best-practices in backpacking skills. Students are billed a materials fee. Enrollment is by instructor permission.

Credits

2

Instructor

Miranda Allen-Brower

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Winter

THEA 9 Puppets, Masks, Performing Objects

Explores the theory, construction, and manipulation of performing objects. Lectures give background on current innovations, their links to older traditions of visual theater, and future directions of this medium. Students construct puppets, masks, etc., and work on their performance possibilities in a workshop format.

Credits

5

THEA 11 Fundamentals of 3-D Design

An exploration of the relationships of forms in space through the construction of 3-dimensional abstract models using various methods and materials. Emphasizes the development of an understanding of primary structures and spatial composition and their specific use in designing for stage, film, and video.

Credits

5

THEA 21B Acting Studio 1B, Actors' Physicality

Uses a rigorous physical approach to acting (rather than the text-based approach of course 21A). Provides an outside-in starting point for theatrical creation and study, balancing and countering the inside-out approach of Stanislavski-based actor training. Emphasis on physical characterization, ensemble theater, mask work, and object performance. May involve practices, theories, and readings of Jerzy Grotowski, Eugenio Barba, Jacques Lecoq, and/or Tadashi Suzuki. Enrollment by interview only.

Credits

5

Instructor

Patricia Gallagher

Quarter offered

Fall

THEA 31P Postmodern Dance I

Introduction to postmodern dance theory and technique. Focus on performance practices of historically significant postmodern dance choreographers in the U.S. and worldwide.

Credits

5

Instructor

Edward Warburton

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

IM

THEA 32 Introduction to Ballet

Introduction to ballet basics such as healthy alignment, anatomically sound articulation of hips and feet, balance control, moving through space harmoniously, and development of technical strength and combinative capacity in a classical, but fluid, aesthetic. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Instructor

Edward Warburton

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Fall

THEA 35 Introduction to Tap Dance

Intensive instruction in developing the dancer's physical instrument combined with basic movement theory.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-C

THEA 70 Working in Theater and the Performing Arts

Creative artists, technicians, and designers discuss the theory and practice of their art. Presentations include discussion of the nature of their artistic work and reflection on the path that brought them to their present work with attention to the creativity and constraint that they experience in their profession.

Credits

2

Instructor

Paul Whitworth

THEA 80E Stand-Up Comedy

American comedy from Mark Twain to present, including popular humor, history, and politics, using comedy from the '20s through the women's gay and civil rights movements. Discussions are based on readings and videos of a wide variety of artists. Students present performances weekly.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

THEA 80F Pacific Rim Performance: Pacific Roots, American Flowerings

The theater, dance, and film of the Pacific Rim region (Asia, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia) in the 20th century, with attention to cultural adaptations of traditional performing arts by Asian Americans, Southeast Asians, and Pacific Islanders who have migrated to California. Lectures on indigenous traditions are illustrated with slides, videotapes, and performance demonstrations. Traditional roots and current manifestations in the California performance are compared and contrasted.

Credits

5

THEA 80G Creative Process/Dance

Introductory dance, with participation in a wide range of movement classes taught by the instructor and guest artists. Students develop their movement experiences through further viewing of world dance, discussion, reading, and writing.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

THEA 80W The Way Things Work and the Theater

Explores basics of mechanics and movement as applied to theatrical and non-theatrical realms. Utilizes textual materials as well as interaction with technology. Topics include structural elements, motion, energy, sound/light, their physical properties and how they interface with pre- and post-modern theater.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

THEA 100L Performance and Conquest

Looks at use of theater/performance in the U.S. and Latin America by the state, oppositional groups, and theater and performance practitioners to solidify or challenge structures of power beginning with pre-Colombian indigenous civilizations, 16th-century Spanish/European conquest, national independence movements, to the U.S. Latino diaspora.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

THEA 107 Design Studio: Masks and Makeup

Advanced work in the design and techniques of stage make-up and masks. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): THEA 10. Enrollment is restricted to theater arts majors; open at the end of priority enrollment if space permits.

THEA 110 Advanced Stage Technology

An investigation into the intricacies of production, focusing on structural, spatial, and visual concepts, creation and execution of scenic units, drafting, and related areas of technology. Designed to facilitate in-depth studies of specific production problems. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): THEA 10.

THEA 125 Shakespeare Off the Page

Offers non-actors, as well as actors, an enhanced understanding of Shakespeare and provides the ability to speak with greater clarity and vividness through reading aloud selected plays and sonnets. Explores work meanings, scansion, phrasing, breathing, tone, articulation, vowels, and consonants.

Credits

5

THEA 129 Advanced Ballet

Continued study of classical ballet technique as a serious, expressive art form. Work includes longer combinations, air work, and style study in a regular class routine. Audition at first class meeting. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

THEA 130 Intermediate Dance Theory and Technique

A progression from the simple phrasing and articulation of beginning technique class to more complex material requiring more acute perceptive skills and richer dynamic range. Emphasis is on both alignment and maintaining the kinetic integrity of the body while moving through space. Students are billed a materials fee. (Formerly Intermediate Modern Dance Theory and Technique.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Gerald Casel

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): THEA 30 or THEA 31 or permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Winter

THEA 131 Advanced Dance Theory and Technique

Advanced instruction in developing the dancer's mind/body, combined with contemporary movement theory and practice. Students are billed a materials fee. (Formerly Advanced Modern Dance Theory and Technique.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Edward Warburton

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): THEA 30 or THEA 31 or permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Spring

THEA 131P Postmodern Dance II

Continued study of postmodern dance theory and technique. Focus on advanced compositional practice, theatrical applications, and critical analysis of contemporary postmodern dance choreographers in the U.S. and worldwide. Audition at first class meeting.

Credits

5

Instructor

Edward Warburton

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

IM

THEA 156 Play Development Workshop

Hands on study and exploration of the process of developing a new script from the perspective of the playwright, the actor, and the director. Students enrolling in this course as playwrights are selected on the basis of submissions turned in the previous quarter. Students taking the course as directors are required to obtain consent of the instructor. Other students may enroll as usual.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-C

THEA 161B Classical Comedy and Its Theater

Examination of selected plays of Euripides, Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, Terence, with workshop presentation of scenes from the plays.

Credits

5

THEA 161G The Development of Modern Drama: Post-World War I European Drama

An examination of the drama of continental Europe from 1918 to the present from an explicitly theatrical viewpoint, involving scene study, investigation of staging techniques, and relevant dramatic criticism. Selected plays from Antonin Artaud, Beckett, Brecht, Camus, Genet, Frisch, de Ghelderode, Gombrowicz, Ionesco, Mrozek, Pirandello, Sartre are read.

Credits

5

THEA 163D O'Neill in the American Theater

Selected plays of Eugene O'Neill studied in the context of the artistic, social, and political ferment in the American theater during the period in which he worked (1913-1953).

Credits

5

THEA 163F Brecht's Theater (in translation)

A study of three basic periods of Brecht's theater, poetry, and prose: 1918-1934 Munich and Berlin; 1933-1947 Exile; 1948-1956 Return to Berlin. Emphasis is on Brecht as theater theorist and stage director. Scene work and papers are required.

Credits

5

WRIT 10A Subject A Tutorial (2 credits per quarter)

A tutorial designed to help students improve their ability to write coherent, accurate prose and to pass the Subject A examination. Counts for academic standing and financial aid purposes, but does not apply toward degree requirements.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

WRIT 10B Subject A Tutorial (2 credits per quarter)

A tutorial designed to help students improve their ability to write coherent, accurate prose and to pass the Subject A examination. Counts for academic standing and financial aid purposes, but does not apply toward degree requirements.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

WRIT 10C Subject A Tutorial (2 credits per quarter)

A tutorial designed to help students improve their ability to write coherent, accurate prose and to pass the Subject A examination. Counts for academic standing and financial aid purposes, but does not apply toward degree requirements.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

WRIT 20 The Nature of Written Discourse

Explores the dynamics of written language: its relationships to speech, thought, and culture; its uses in different personal, academic, professional, and public contexts; its abuses in jargon and propaganda. Course work includes extensive practice in different kinds of writing.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to students who have not passed the Entry Level Writing Requirement. Open to others by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Winter, Summer

WRIT 21 Meaning and Style: The Sentence in Context

Explores, via cross-cultural readings, the nature, uses, and abuses of language. Course work includes extensive writing, both take-home and in-class. Emphasis on revising for power of expression and for variety and accuracy at the sentence level.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to students who have not passed the Entry Level Writing Requirement. Open to others by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

WRIT 22A Grammar and Editing Workshop

Offers instruction on selected topics in grammar and conventions of written English as needed to strengthen the writing skills of students whose primary language is not standard English. Provides students practice in applying these concepts to editing their own writing. Designed for entering first-year students.

Credits

3

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to first-year students.

WRIT 22B Grammar and Editing Workshop

Offers instruction on selected topics in grammar and conventions of written English as needed to strengthen the writing skills of students whose primary language is not standard English. Provides students practice in applying these concepts to editing their own writing. Designed for continuing students who have already taken course 20 and/or 21.

Credits

3

WRIT 24 Writing for Academic Purposes

Addresses reading college-level materials and writing college-level paragraphs and short essays. Enrollment is by interview only. Enrollment is restricted to incoming frosh of whom the TOEFL is required for entrance to UCSC.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

WRIT 61 Intermediate Writing: Research Techniques

Offering practice in writing expository, argumentative, and analytical prose, this course emphasizes the composition of lengthy essays and the techniques of research as well as its politics and ethics. One major research paper and several other essays are required. (61A: A special section designed specifically for re-entry women. The Staff; B: A special section designed specifically for re-entry men. The Staff.)

Credits

5

WRIT 61A Res Tech Reent Wom

Res Tech Reent Wom

Credits

5

WRIT 61B Res Tech Reent Men

Res Tech Reent Men

Credits

5

WRIT 63 Expository Writing

Expository Writing

Credits

5

WRIT 121 Advanced Workshop in Grammar and Style

For students who have mastered basic writing skills and wish to increase their proficiency in written English, expand their awareness of grammar as it relates to writing style, and practice techniques for editing their own writing. Designed for students who are bilingual or non-native speakers of English.

Credits

3

Repeatable for credit

Yes