CHEM-Chemistry and Biochemistry

CHEM 1P Chemistry Essentials

Introduction to basic concepts required for the Chemistry 1 series. This course is for students who have little background in high school chemistry or equivalent. Covers elementary topics including units, conversions, the mole, chemical reactions, and balancing. This course is offered during Summer Session only.

Credits

3

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

CHEM 4A General Chemistry with Quantitative Analysis

A thorough introduction to the principles and practice of chemistry. Topics include chemical reactions, gas laws, equilibrium, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, elementary kinetics and thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Aspects of the theory and practice of quantitative analysis are integrated with the lectures and accompanying laboratory (courses 4L-4M). Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; discussion: 1-1/4 hours.

Credits

5

CHEM 4B General Chemistry with Quantitative Analysis

A thorough introduction to the principles and practice of chemistry. Topics include chemical reactions, gas laws, equilibrium, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, elementary kinetics and thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Aspects of the theory and practice of quantitative analysis are integrated with the lectures and accompanying laboratory (courses 4L-4M). Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; discussion: 1-1/4 hours.

Credits

5

CHEM 4L General Chemistry with Quantitative Analysis Laboratory

Laboratory sequence that covers topics taught in Chemistry 4A-4B, respectively. Experiments include qualitative and quantitative analyses, redox titrations, spectroscopy, chromatography, electrochemistry, kinetic data acquisition and analysis. Concurrent enrollment in 4A and 4B is strongly recommended. Laboratory: 4 hours; lecture: 1 hour. Students will be billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

CHEM 4M General Chemistry with Quantitative Analysis Laboratory

Laboratory sequence that covers topics taught in Chemistry 4A-4B, respectively. Experiments include qualitative and quantitative analyses, redox titrations, spectroscopy, chromatography, electrochemistry, kinetic data acquisition and analysis. Concurrent enrollment in 4A and 4B is strongly recommended. Laboratory: 4 hours; lecture: 1 hour. Students will be billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

CHEM 80A Chemistry of Nutrition: Concepts and Controversy

Description of the relevant chemical and physical properties of the main classes of foods, vitamins, and minerals. Discussion of their digestion, sources, metabolism, recommended daily allowances, deficiencies, and how to optimize an overall healthy diet using scientific methods. Prerequisite(s): High school chemistry course recommended.

Credits

5

General Education Code

SI

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

CHEM 80D An Analytical View of Wines and Wine Chemistry

An introduction to chemical aspects of wines including winemaking and appreciation. Sensory examination and comparison of California and French wines are undertaken in part by considering chemical factors which influenced quality. Principles of laboratory analysis of different types of wines are also studied. Elements from both lecture discussion topics and laboratory experiments are used to discuss the quality of commercial wines and wine made by each student in the laboratory. It is recommended that students have completed high school chemistry or equivalent; students must be 21 years of age or older.

Credits

5

CHEM 80F Chemistry and the Environment

Presents a brief introduction to chemistry, with an emphasis on those fundamentals and processes of environmental importance. Focuses on basic chemical concepts, their application to provide a better understanding of environmental actions, and their use in formulating solutions to environmental problems. Concepts and processes (rather than quantitative and analytical perspectives) are stressed, alongside environmental problem solving using the principles presented. Offered in alternate academic years.

Credits

5

CHEM 80L Introduction to Chemistry of Wines and Musts

An integrated course exploring elementary aspects of wine evaluation and modern winemaking. Topics: effects of grape varieties, vineyard locations, production techniques, aging practices on wine quality, and winemaking. Survey of commercial wine styles and lab methods of wine component analysis provide insights on how fine wines are made and analyzed. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Philip Crews

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 80H.

CHEM 112A Organic Chemistry

An integrated study of fundamental organic chemistry, including principles, descriptive chemistry, synthetic methods, reaction mechanisms, and compounds of biological interest. These courses are coordinated with 112L-M-N respectively and are to be taken concurrently with them. Students with credit in course 108A cannot receive credit for 112A. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; optional discussion section: 1-1/4 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Claude Bernasconi

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1B, CHEM 1C, and CHEM 1N. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 112L is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 112B Organic Chemistry

An integrated study of fundamental organic chemistry, including principles, descriptive chemistry, synthetic methods, reaction mechanisms, and compounds of biological interest. These courses are coordinated with 112L-M-N respectively and are to be taken concurrently with them. Students with credit in 108B cannot receive credit for 112B. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; optional discussion section: 1-1/4 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Claude Bernasconi

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112 and CHEM 112L. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 112M is required.

Quarter offered

Winter

CHEM 112C Organic Chemistry

An integrated study of fundamental organic chemistry, including principles, descriptive chemistry, synthetic methods, reaction mechanisms, and compounds of biological interest. These courses are coordinated with 112L-M-N respectively and are to be taken concurrently with them. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; optional discussion section: 1-1/4 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Lokey

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112B and CHEM 112M. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 112N is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 112L Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory experience in organic chemistry and associated principles. Experiments involve the preparation, purification, characterization, and identification of organic compounds and make use of modern as well as classical techniques. Lecture: 1-1/2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Daniel Palleros

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1C and CHEM 1N. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 112A is required.

Quarter offered

Fall

CHEM 112M Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory experience in organic chemistry and associated principles. Experiments involve the preparation, purification, characterization, and identification of organic compounds and make use of modern as well as classical techniques. Lecture: 1-1/2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Daniel Palleros

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112A and CHEM 112L. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 112B is required.

Quarter offered

Winter

CHEM 112N Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory experience in organic chemistry and associated principles. Experiments involve the preparation, purification, characterization, and identification of organic compounds and make use of modern as well as classical techniques. Lecture: 1-1/4 hours. Laboratory: 8 hours. Students are billed a materials fee.

Credits

2

Instructor

Daniel Palleros

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112B and CHEM 112M. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 112C is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 137 Teaching Science in the University

Readings and seminar considering why students are taking science, what science curricula are appropriate under present-day conditions, the relation of values to science, modern approaches to the teaching of knowledge and skills, modern approaches to enriching human interaction in university education. Each student serves as facilitator for a study group in course 1.

Credits

5

CHEM 138 Advanced Science Teaching

Readings and seminars on teaching science. Each student serves as facilitator for a study group in course 1, observes at meetings of the study groups, and moderates a course 137/8 seminar. Final projects or reports are required.

Credits

5

CHEM 146D Advanced Laboratory in Computational Chemistry

Designed to give experience in advanced computational chemistry through open-ended research-type problem solving. Covers molecular graphics, molecular mechanics, semi-empirical and abinitio calculations applied to conformational analysis, reaction predictions, and drug design.

Credits

2

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 108B or CHEM 112C.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 165 Physical Chemistry Topics

Introduction to modern special topics in physical chemistry. Topics may include macromolecules, spectroscopy, and solid-state materials. Lecture-3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

CHEM 191A Beginning

Students lead one 3L or 8L laboratory section, under the direct supervision of a teaching assistant (T.A.), hold office hours, and attend the T.A. meetings for the course.

Credits

5

CHEM 191B Intermediate

Students lead one 3L or 8L laboratory section, hold office hours, and attend a T.A. meeting for the course.

Credits

5

CHEM 191C Advanced

Students lead one 3M or 8M laboratory section, hold office hours, and attend a T.A. meeting for the course.

Credits

5

CHEM 220 Biochemical Toxicology

Presents an in-depth treatment of the biochemical and physiological mechanisms underlying toxicity and detoxication. Topics include chemical-biological interactions, receptor dynamics, multicompartment kinetics, chemical activation and detoxication, induction and inhibition, and the toxic biochemical and physiological mechanisms of both natural and anthropogenic toxins.

Credits

5

CHEM 240D Computational Organic Chemistry

Current computational methods used to predict reaction products, evaluate conformational energies, and correlate NMR spectra with conformations are examined. Molecular mechanics treatments are compared to semiempirical AM1 calculations.

Credits

3

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 245 Synthetic Organic Chemistry

An advanced study of the strategy and reactions used in organic synthesis, with an emphasis on selectivity in organic transformations.

Credits

5

CHEM 246A Organic Reactions and Molecular Orbital Theory

Qualitative molecular orbital concepts, especially concerning aromaticity, orbital symmetry, and perturbation theory, and their application toward interpretation of reactivity and mechanism. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 273 and CHEM 240A.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 246B Marine Organic Chemistry

A survey of organic natural products from marine sources. Organic chemical structural families unique to marine organisms are outlined. Pathways of their synthesis and interconversions; their role in the marine environment; approaches to their analysis; the distribution of organics in seawater. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Philip Crews

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 8B and CHEM 8M.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 246C Computers and Information Processing in Chemistry

An introduction to digital computers and their applications in chemistry. Includes Monte Carlo, artificial intelligence, pattern recognition, modeling, simulation, and optimization problem-solving methods. Applications to include structural analysis, spectroscopy, organic synthesis, and kinetics. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours; laboratory: 1-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 246F Organoboranes in Organic Synthesis

An introduction to organoborane chemistry and its applications to synthetic organic chemistry, including principles, synthetic methods, reaction mechanisms, and asymmetric synthesis. A variety of topics including allylboration, boron-enolates, and asymmetric reductions are discussed.

Credits

5

Instructor

Bakthan Singaram

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to seniors and graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 246G Heterocyclic Chemistry

Advanced study of synthesis and reactions of heterocyclic organic compounds; particular emphasis on structures with important medicinal value from natural products or pharmaceutical research.

Credits

5

Instructor

Joseph Konopelski

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 143 or approval of instructor.

CHEM 246H Organic Free Radical Chemistry

Covers a range of topics including radical stabilization, rates of fundamental radical reactions, methods of radical generation, synthetic applications of free radicals, persistent radicals, and some aspects of free radicals in biology.

Credits

5

Instructor

Rebecca Braslau

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 143 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 246I Advanced Mechanistic Chemistry and Solution Kinetics

Kinetic approach to selected topics in mechanistic chemistry with emphasis on structure-reactivity relationships in organic as well as inorganic and biochemical systems. Discussion of significance and treatment of kinetic data illustrated with examples from various branches of chemistry. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

Credits

5

Instructor

Claude Bernasconi

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 264 Quantum Theory of Atoms and Molecules

Application of quantum mechanical techniques to the study of the electronic structure and properties of atoms and molecules. Topics include methods used to calculate the atomic and molecular wave functions, molecular symmetry, semiclassical radiation theory, magnetic interactions, and the utilization of approximate wave functions in interpreting molecular properties. Lecture-3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

CHEM 266B Gas Phase Kinetics

A discussion of rate processes in gases. Descriptions of experimental and theoretical work on unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions and energy transfer processes. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 262.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 273 Applications of Symmetry and Quantum Mechanics

Group theory and quantum mechanics are applied to problems of the electronic structure and spectra of molecules. A variety of topics including molecular orbital theory, reactivity, electronic structure calculations, and spectroscopy are discussed. Lecture: 3-1/2 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Eugene Switkes

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 163A.

Quarter offered

Spring

CHEM 283 Proseminar in Physical Organic Chemistry

Weekly meetings devoted to the study of physical and mechanistic organic chemistry. Topics drawn from the current literature and the research experiences of the participants.

Credits

5

Instructor

Claude Bernasconi

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 287 Proseminar in Protein Aggregation and Protein Deposition Diseases

A detailed study of various aspects of protein structure, folding, and aggregation in the context of the molecular mechanism of protein deposition diseases, with particular emphasis on Parkinson's disease and amyloidosis and the techniques involved in elucidating these mechanisms.

Credits

5

Instructor

Anthony Fink

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 289 Proseminar: Biophysical Chemistry

Weekly meetings devoted to a detailed study of the theory and applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging and related spectroscopic techniques to problems in biophysical chemistry. Topics are drawn from the current research literature and the research experiences of the participants.

Credits

5

Instructor

Thomas Schleich

Repeatable for credit

Yes

CHEM 290 Proseminar in Computational Chemistry

Weekly meetings devoted to the study of computational chemistry. Topics include molecular modeling, synthesis planning, drug design, and others from current literature and research interests of the participants.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 291A Organic Chemistry Research Seminar

Open to chemistry graduate students interested in organic chemistry. Weekly meetings are held to hear both local and external speakers discuss their work.

Credits

5

Instructor

Rebecca Braslau, Philip Crews, Roger Linington

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 291B Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Research Seminar

A weekly seminar series covering topics on the frontiers of biochemistry and molecular biology. The speakers include experts in these fields from other institutions.

Credits

5

Instructor

William Scott, Glenn Millhauser, Michael Stone

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 291C Inorganic Chemistry Research Seminar

For those interested in following the recent developments in the various areas of inorganic chemistry. External speakers; weekly discussion based on personal research or recent literature, led by the inorganic chemistry faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and students.

Credits

5

Instructor

Theodore Holman, Pradip Mascharak, Scott Oliver

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

CHEM 291D Physical Chemistry Research Seminar

A weekly seminar series covering topics of current research in physical chemistry. Weekly meetings are held to hear both local and external speakers discuss their work.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ilan Benjamin, Yat Li, Jin Zhang

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring