EART-Earth Sciences

EART 4 Earth's Environment and the Cinema

Exploration of cinema's role in defining societal awareness of Earth sciences (underlying concepts and factual basis) for disaster and adventure movies and in more subtle presentations. Topics include evolution of life, surface environment and the planet's deep interior, natural hazards, global warming, and meteorite impacts. (Formerly course 80D, Earth Sciences and the Cinema.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Thorne Lay

General Education Code

PE-E

Quarter offered

Spring

EART 6 Concepts in Environmentalism

Learn scientific concepts required to be an informed environmentalist. Topics include urban smog; water resources and pollution; waste treatment; acid rain; global climate change; fossil fuel, nuclear, and renewable energy; overpopulation; and how an individual can minimize his or her environmental impact.

Credits

5

Instructor

Patrick Chuang

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

EART 9 Earth History and Global Change

Over the past 4.5 billion years, planet Earth has evolved in exciting ways. Environments, climates, and life forms have come and gone in fascinating combinations. Course examines changing physical, biological, and climatological conditions through geologic time, beginning with the evolution of the Earth through changes leading to the current state of the planet, and considers prospects for Earth's future.

Credits

5

General Education Code

PE-E

EART 113 Physics in the Earth Sciences

Physics applied to geological problems, including basic mechanics, stress and strain, heat transport, and fluid flow. Discussion-2 hours.

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Coe

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): EART 111 or MATH 22 or MATH 23A; and PHYS 5B or PHYS 6B.

Quarter offered

Spring

EART 114 Environmental Geophysics

Explores the shallow subsurface environment, including groundwater systems, buried faults, sedimentary basins and other environmentally significant features using the tools of geophysics. Data acquisition and interpretation focus on understanding processes and defining problems.

Credits

5

EART 115 Applied Geophysics

Introduction to field and laboratory techniques in geophysics and their application to geologic and environmental problems. Includes introduction to seismic reflection and refraction, gravity, magnetic, and electrical resistivity methods. Laboratory-6 hours.

Credits

5

EART 117 Paleomagnetism

How the fossil magnetism of rocks is used to decipher Earth's history: applications to tectonics, geochronology, stratigraphy, structural geology, geomagnetism, and archeology. Includes an overnight field trip to collect samples for a class research project.

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Coe

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): EART 5, EART 10 or EART 20; and PHYS 5C or PHYS 6C or equivalent per instructor permission; concurrent enrollment in EART 117L is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

EART 117L Paleomagnetism Laboratory

A hands-on research project in the Paleomagnetic Laboratory. Students collectively drill oriented cores in the field (one–two days), prepare and measure the samples, and analyze and interpret the data. Each student writes an individual final report based on the class results.

Credits

2

Instructor

Robert Coe

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): concurrent enrollment in EART 117 is required.

Quarter offered

Spring

EART 122 Paleoceanography

Reconstruction of the chemistry, biology, circulation, and temperature of the ocean and of climate systems throughout geologic time. Emphasis on interpretation of the marine sedimentary record and geochemical cycling. Discussion-1 hour. Will be offered in the 2006–07 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Margaret Delaney

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): EART 102 or EART 110A, or OCEA 101 (may be taken concurrently) or EART 102.

EART 123 Marine Stratigraphy

Introduction to the fundamental concepts and methods of modern marine stratigraphy. Topics covered include lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, chemostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, seismic stratigraphy, cyclestratigraphy, graphic correlation, and spectral analysis. Practical application of techniques is explored within the context of Cenozoic paleoceanography. One Saturday field exercise. Will be offered in the 2001-02 academic year.

Credits

5

EART 132 Advanced Mineralogy

Introduction to the physics and chemistry of bonding in minerals and silicate melts. Relationship of mineral and melt structures to physical properties. Application of modern analytical techniques to studying the structures, chemistry, and physical properties of Earth materials.

Credits

5

EART 147 Field Methods in Hydrology

Covers field methods used in water resources management and groundwater contamination studies, including well pumping tests, unsaturated zone monitoring, and ground-water sampling techniques.

Credits

5

EART 167 Formation of the Solar System

The formation of asteroids, comets, moons, planets, and the samples that derive from them, with a focus on meteorites, astronomical discoveries, spacecraft mission results, and modeling. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 267.

Credits

5

Instructor

Erik Asphaug

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): MATH 11B or MATH 19B or EART 111; and PHYS 5A or PHYS 6A; and EART 160.

Quarter offered

Winter

EART 168 Reflection Seismology

Introduction to reflection seismology, presenting an overview of data acquisition, processing, and interpretation; common depth point method; velocity determinations; filtering; migration; display. Applications to seismic stratigraphy and structure of the crust and of continental margins. Laboratory: 3 hours.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): EART 111; or MATH 11A and MATH 11B; or MATH 19A and MATH 19B; or AM 15A and AM 15B.

EART 170 Global Seismology

Introduction to quantitative earthquake and global Earth structure seismology. Topics include basic elasticity, wave characteristics, seismic ray theory, wave reflection, surface waves, normal modes, seismic instrumentation, application of seismic waves to reveal Earth structure and resulting models, representation of earthquake sources such as explosions and faulting, earthquake rupture scaling, modern methods of modeling seismic recordings to study source complexity, and an introduction to seismotectonics. Laboratory-3 hours. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 270.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

EART 190A Senior Seminar

Seminar concerning a major scientific debate in the earth sciences and designed to integrate the undergraduate major. Topics vary quarterly and require synthesis of geological, geophysical, and geochemical information mostly drawn from the current research literature.

Credits

5

EART 196A Introductory Teaching Seminar

Training for undergraduates in practical teaching skills. Focus on preparation, assessment, and feedback. Classroom techniques, organizational and time management strategies, practice teaching sessions. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 203. Future participation in 196B is encouraged. Course may not be counted toward upper-division major requirements.

Credits

2

Instructor

Emily Brodsky

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to Earth sciences, Earth sciences/anthropology, and environmental studies/Earth sciences majors.

Quarter offered

Fall

EART 205 Introductory Graduate Seminar

Lecture and- seminar-style class intended to welcome new graduate students to the department and to introduce students to the research and interests of departmental faculty and researchers. Includes exercises to develop skills in reading scientific abstracts and papers and in writing abstracts and proposals. Two weekend field trips.

Credits

2

Instructor

Susan Schwartz

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to Earth sciences graduate students.

Quarter offered

Fall

EART 209 Solid Earth Geochemistry

Origin and distribution of the elements in the earth and meteorites; bulk and isotopic composition and differentiation of terrestrial planets, core, mantle, and crust; Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf-U isotopic tracers. Course designed for graduate students, but available to qualified earth sciences majors per instructor permission.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

EART 210 Overview of Stellar and Planetary Formation and Evolution

Overview of current understanding of star and planet formation and evolution. Examines our solar system in the context of the galactic planetary census. Provides a uniform introduction to astronomy and Earth science planetary students.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

EART 231 Igneous Petrology

Systematic study of the major igneous rock suites, combining petrography, experimental petrology, major and trace elements, volatiles, and isotopic characteristics. Laboratory: three hours. Course designed for graduate students but available to qualified earth sciences majors. Course 130 is recommended as preparation.

Credits

5

EART 245 Advanced Geomorphology

Rigorous presentation of major subsets of geomorphology: I. Mechanics of sediment transport. Physics of sediment transport in both air and water. II. Mechanics of hillslope processes. III. Glaciology and glacial geology. Topics vary from year to year between these three. Will be offered in the 2005–06 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Anderson

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): EART 140 and EART 113 or EART 110C. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; qualified Earth sciences majors may enroll with permission of instructor.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

EART 248 Sedimentology Field Studies

Alternates between lectures, seminars, discussions, and field trips to dune fields, beaches, and other coastal, marine, and fluvial environments. Class time focuses on selected processes and structures in sedimentology; field trips emphasize observational techniques.

Credits

3

Instructor

David Rubin

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

EART 250 Marine Micropaleontology

Introduces students to the biology, paleontology, and biostratigraphy of marine microfossils. Included are planktonic and benthic foraminifera, calcareous nannoplankton, diatoms, radiolaria and ostracodes. Focus is on microscope identification of Cenozoic microfossils in a weekly laboratory.

Credits

5

EART 251 Photogrammetry

Introduces photogrammetry 's basic principles of imaging systems and digital-image processing for both terrestrial and planetary data, leading to the application of photogrammetry techniques to a final project of the student's choosing.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students or by permission of instructor.

Quarter offered

Fall

EART 256 Paleoclimate Modeling: Methods and Applications

Addresses methods of paleoclimate modeling on global and regional scales, from both surface and atmospheric perspectives. Applications of models to current significant paleoclimate problems will be examined. Includes both lecture and seminar formats.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students; undergraduates by permission of instructor only.

EART 261 Astrobiology

Study of the evolution and diversification of life on this planet; and factors affecting habitability of other bodies in this solar system and elsewhere.

Credits

5

Instructor

Paul Koch, Walter Nimmo

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students in Earth sciences, physics, biology, or chemistry.

EART 263L Planetary Field Course

Field class in comparative planetology. Three- to four -day field trip plus planning and debriefing sessions.

Credits

2

Instructor

Erik Asphaug

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

EART 267 Formation of the Solar System

The formation of asteroids, comets, moons, planets, and the samples that derive from them, with a focus of meteorites, astronomical discoveries, spacecraft mission results, and modeling. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 167.

Credits

5

Instructor

Erik Asphaug

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Winter

EART 269 Advanced Marine Stratigraphy: Techniques and Applications

Explores concepts and methods of correlating marine sedimentary sequences. Emphasis on the integration of techniques and development of the Cenozoic stratigraphic record. One 2-hour laboratory each week. Upper-division students who have completed course 120 may enroll in this course.

Credits

5

Instructor

James Zachos

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

Quarter offered

Spring

EART 276 Geology of the Peopling of the Americas

Using a multidisciplinary approach, examines physical geology, paleoenvironment, human biology, linguistics, and culture history of Americas at end of last Ice Age. Particular emphasis on reconstructing timing, routes, and context of first peopling of the American continents. Taught in conjunction with Anthropology 276D. Students cannot receive credit for both courses.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Paul Koch

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

EART 278B Advanced Seismology

Special topics in wave propagation in heterogeneous, three-dimensional media, applications for determination of Earth's structure, kinematics and dynamics of the seismic source, near field phenomena, engineering applications, current problems.

Credits

5

Requirements

Course is designed for graduate students but available to qualified Earth sciences majors. PHYS 110B and PHYS 116B are recommended as preparation. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

EART 278C Advanced Seismology

Special topics of interest in current research by the seismology group. Discussion of new developments in earthquake mechanics, wave propagation, tectonics, earthquake prediction.

Credits

5

Requirements

Course is designed for graduate students but available to qualified Earth sciences majors. PHYS 110B and PHYS 116B are recommended as preparation. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

EART 279 Interpretive Data Processing

Rigorous statistical treatment of geophysical data involving: Bayesian inference; stochastic processes and fields; information theory; non-linear and non-assumptive error analysis; cluster analysis; regional variables; correlograms and kriging. Develops the theoretical framework of linear geostatistics and geophysical inverse theory. Designed for graduate students but available to qualified Earth sciences majors.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

EART 280C Contaminants and Ecosystems: Topics

A graduate discussion course considering geochemical, biological, and ecological aspects of contaminants and ecosystems. The interdisciplinary nature of the this subject is emphasized through critical readings and discussion. Each student explores a topic in detail by preparing a written review and leading a class discussion.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

EART 290J Topics in Geomorphology and Quaternary History

Selected topics in Earth surface processes and Quaternary history are treated in detail. Emphasis is placed on recent advances, both in theory and in field and dating techniques. Course designed for graduate students but available to qualified Earth sciences majors. Will be offered in the 2005-06 academic year.

Credits

5

Instructor

Robert Anderson

Repeatable for credit

Yes