HIS-History

HIS 1 Theories of History/Theories of Society

European social thought understands society to be the product of the historical process. Readings from early-modern natural law thinkers (Hobbes, Lock, Rousseau), 19th-century theorists of the democratic and industrial revolutions (Tocqueville, Marx), and 20th-century social scientists (Weber, Braudel), explore the nature of this fertile connection.

Credits

5

General Education Code

TA

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 3 Slavery in World History

Although most teaching and research on slavery has focused on slavery in the Americas (and not always from a comparative perspective), the institution of slavery has been part of societies in nearly every part of the world. This course addresses questions such as the shape slavery took in different times and places, the bases and justification for enslavement, who could or could not be enslaved, occupational employment, possibilities for manumission, and the weaning or abolition of the institution. The last third is dedicated to slavery in the Americas. (Formerly course 36.)

Credits

5

HIS 5B Early Christianity: First to Fourth Century A.D.

Christianity from its origins as a Jewish messianic movement, its expansion in multiple forms in the Greco-Roman world and the East, to its transformation into the major religion of the Roman and Byzantine empires.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 7 Archives and Public History

Through readings on local history topics and bi-weekly field expeditions, students discover different types of archives and historical repositories, the diversity of sources that they contain, and the varied uses to which they can be put. Course also explores the range of career opportunities open to history majors (sometimes loosely grouped together under the rubric public history).

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 14 Race and Ethnicity in the U.S

An introductory course on the racial/ethnic history of the U.S. Of central concern are issues of race, ethnicity, oppression, resistance, mass migrations, city life in urban America, and power and protest in modern America. Priority enrollment to freshmen and sophomores.

Credits

5

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 43 Traditional India

A survey of the early histories of Indus Valley, Vedism, the epics, Buddhism, Jainism, with an exploration among original sources: archaeological, visual, ritual, literary, and epic texts. Thematic focus on communities, social systems, elite and popular cultures, and their mutual interaction. (Formerly Histories of Traditional India)

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 65B Europe, 1000-1500

Reviews major social, political, economic, and cultural developments in Europe from 1000 to 1500 and themes including gender, warfare, ethnicity and religion, through primary sources and secondary readings. Primary focus is Western Europe: England, France, the Iberian Peninsula, the Holy Roman Empire, the Low Countries, and Italy.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nuria Silleras-Fernandez

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 80H Class, Gender, and Community in China, 1700-Present

Examines gender, sexuality, and family across classes in late imperial China, and the transformation of all three by revolution (and vice versa). Concentrates throughout on gender as a category of historical analysis that has remained largely invisible in the construction of conventional Chinese history.

Credits

5

Instructor

Gail Hershatter

General Education Code

CC

HIS 80Q History and Public Policy

An examination of the history of public policy in the U.S. considering the changing political, racial, and gender ideologies that have informed social policies over time and led to inequality in American society. Students are required to have a field placement in addition to class time. Will be offered in the 2002–03 academic year.

Credits

5

HIS 101A The Making of the Modern World, 1400-1750

Focuses on the transformation of many different societies of Asia, Africa, and the Americas from 1400 to 1750 through case histories and the comparative study of European colonial hegemony, labor systems, global economic exchange, missions, and warfare.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 101B The Making of the Modern World, 1750-1950

The history of the world from 1750. Focuses on the liberal project (the industrial and democratic revolutions) and its impact on the world—slavery and abolition, self-strengthening movements, race and class, imperialism, colonialism, and nationalism.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 107 Religion and Modernity

Explores the impact of modernity on a variety of religious traditions. Examines the rise of secularism and the phenomenon of disenchantment; the invention of religion; and the emergence of fundamentalism in the modern period.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nathaniel Deutsch

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 108 Social Movements in Historical Perspective

Readings examine 18th- through 20th-century social movements and related phenomena in Europe/America: examples include Tulipomania; revolutionary action in France; U.S. Civil Rights movement; and the environmental and feminist movements. Lectures focus on social science frameworks used to explore the social base, tactics, success or failure, and inter-relationships of social movements as a distinctive mode of social change.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 115A U.S. Labor History to 1919

Explores the history of work, working-class people, and the labor movement in the U.S., with attention to race and gender dynamics as well as to the development of workers' organizations.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dana Frank

American History and Institutions

Yes

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Fall, Summer

HIS 115B U.S. Labor History, 1919 to the Present

Explores the history of work, working-class people, and the labor movement in the U.S. in global perspective with attention to race and gender dynamics and political-economic changes.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dana Frank

American History and Institutions

Yes

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 115C Learning from the U.S. Great Depression

Examines U.S. society, politics, and culture during the 1930s, with emphasis on the relationship between social movements and public policy, and dynamics of race, ethnicity, immigration, and gender, and dynamics between labor, business, and the state.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dana Frank

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 127 Race and the American City

History of racial and ethnic minorities in the American city in the 19th and 20th centuries. Examines the experiences of several non-white groups, with analyses of race, class, culture, gender, acculturation, and implications for social policy in the urban environment.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

American History and Institutions

Yes

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 129 History and Public Policy

Helps students better understand the various social/economic/political issues of public policy by providinga historical perspective analysis. Each student is required to participate in a public history/public service internship.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

American History and Institutions

Yes

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 132 History of the Caribbean: Colonial Period

A study of the Caribbean from the conquest to the abolition of slavery in the 19th century. Focus on the Greater Antilles, particularly the Spanish Caribbean. Emphasis on economic and social issues such as colonialism and the role of sugar production, slavery, and race/ethnicity in these multicultural societies.

Credits

5

Instructor

Maria Diaz

HIS 133 Topics in Colonial Latin American History, Early and Middle Period

Studies Pre-18th century colonial Latin America, with particular emphasis on Peru and Mexico. Topics include: strategies of colonization; cities and urban life; and knowledge, technology, and the professions (ethnographic projects, indigenous intellectuals, schools and universities, medicine and hospitals, the law and the courts).

Credits

5

Instructor

Maria Diaz

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 135A Brazil to 1889

Exploration of the social history of colonial and imperial Brazil. Material progresses chronologically and thematically from the pre-contact indigenous societies that were encountered in South America to the colonization of Brazil through independence to the 19th-Century empire that ended in 1889.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 135B Brazil Since 1889

Exploration of the social history of the Brazilian republic. Course passes chronologically and thematically from the end of the Empire in 1889 to present-day Brazilian films, texts, and lectures.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 140A History of China

China to 1644. Examines the origins and development of the Chinese political and cultural order, including intellectual and religious systems, the imperial state, village and urban life, the family system, gender hierarchy, economic transformation, millenarianism and rebellion. (Formerly course 150A.)

Credits

5

HIS 140F Modern China

Explores aspects of Chinese history from the 16th to the 21st Century. Analyzes modernization movements, nationalism, the party-state regime, gender and family, minority policies, human rights, the Chinese legal system, national identity, and the Chinese diaspora.

Credits

5

Instructor

The Staff

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 148 Cinema and History: Film Author Satyajit Ray

Satyajit Ray is widely acclaimed as a master of world cinema. Course considers his work to examine authorship at multiple levels: the cultural, historical, social, and familial contexts and the relationship of his film to fiction, the politics and poetics of his vision, and its relationship to colonial, nationalist, and postcolonial India. Also studies the question of gender and the underclass.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 153 Mediterranean Empire, 1100–1500

Political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Crown of Aragon, a major medieval Mediterranean power which failed to survive the transition to the modern world. Emphasis on interaction between diverse ethnic/religious groups within and outside of the Crown.

Credits

5

Instructor

Brian Catlos

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): HIS 32, HIS 33, or HIS 163.

HIS 154A Classic Islamic Civilization

The civilization of Islam to 1258 A.D. Origins and early florescence, an international civilization, the coming of the steppe peoples. (Formerly course 161.)

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 154B Islam in the Modern World, 1500 to the Present

Surveys the history of modern Islamic societies from the emergence of the regional gunpowder empires (Ottoman Turkish, Safevi Persian, Mughal Indian) in the 16th century to their subsequent transformations in the new global context of Western hegemony and the world market. (Formerly course 162.)

Credits

5

HIS 160B Greek Art and Archaeology

An introduction to the physical manifestations of ancient Greece, with emphasis on the various interpretative strategies for deciphering the cultural meanings of the material object. The specific topic of the course rotates among the following: Aegean Bronze Age; Dark Ages and Archaic Period; Classical Greece; the Hellenistic World. (Formerly course 102.)

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

HIS 162 Canaan, Israel, and Palestine from Polytheism to Monotheism

This social and cultural history of Israel begins with the rise of the Israelite monarchy and ends in the early Roman period. Economy, political organization, and religious practices and beliefs such as polytheism and monotheism are compared with those of neighboring peoples. Priority given to history majors.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 163A A History of Sin

Ancient and modern conceptions of sin, and remedies offered for it. Course is not a theology of sin and redemption, but an invitation to reflect on ways sin and fault have been imagined and formulated. (Formerly course 163.)

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 165 The Power of Writing: Books and Libraries 600-1500

Surveys how books were made and used in Europe from 600-1500. Focuses on the relationship between book production and the development of libraries. Meets in Special Collections, McHenry Library. Exhibition as class project.

Credits

5

Instructor

Elisabeth Remak-Honnef

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 168 Rise of the Dutch Republic

Focuses on the origin of the Republic in the revolt against Spanish overlordship, and its political, social, and economic development in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 178D Russian Intellectual History

Focus on the emergence in 19th-century Russia of a westernized intelligentsia; its effort both to assimilate western ideas and to define the destinies of Russia; the shaping of the Russian revolutionary movement. Readings in Dostoyevsky, Turgenev, Herzen, and representative Russian Slavophils, Populists, and Nihilists.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall

HIS 180B English History

Considers how Britain became the pacemaker of modernity in the 18th and 19th centuries; how national, regional, class, and gender identities formed and altered; and how Britain coped with loss of global power in the 20th century.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 185H Women, Gender, and Jewish Modernity (1800-Present)

Explores the impact of modernization upon women and the concepts of gender, both feminine and masculine, in Jewish societies across Europe, the Middle East, and India.

Credits

5

Instructor

Nathaniel Deutsch

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 190S Women and Social Movements in the U.S

Examines history of women and social movements in the U.S., such as abolitionism, anti-lynching, Chinese and Jewish garment workers, Chicana farm labor activism, the American Indian Movement, the Ku Klux Klan, and the Civil Rights movement.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dana Frank

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements, two upper-division history courses, or permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior history majors.

Quarter offered

Spring

HIS 194X The Cold War in the Mediterranean, 1942-1991

Writing-intensive course on the Mediterranean. Topics include: U.S. relations with the region (including direct and indirect intervention), local responses, and cultural transformations. Students pursue advanced research using primary and secondary sources.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements and two upper-division history courses. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior history majors.

Quarter offered

Winter

HIS 204D Race, Gender, and Colonialism Research Seminar

Reading and research seminar for graduate students interested in gender, colonialism, nationalism, and race. Topics include theories and methods employed in different chronological and national contexts. (Formerly course 225.)

Credits

5

HIS 210C Readings in U.S. History

Introduction to major themes and controversies in the interpretation of U.S. history. Readings cover both chronological eras and topical subjects, often in a comparative context: 20th century.

Credits

5

Instructor

Matthew Lasar

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate history majors.

Quarter offered

Winter