SOCY-Sociology

SOCY 80B AIDS and Society: Introduction to the Epidemic

Examines the impact of AIDS on contemporary society and the social forces shaping the HIV epidemic; the experience of people affected, both gay and straight; cultural and political dimensions of the AIDS crisis; the character of scientific and medical research on AIDS; action for prevention and care, in the U.S. and globally. Special attention to the impact of race, gender, and sexuality.

Credits

5

SOCY 80F Global Islam: Modernity, Politics, and Gender

An introduction to Islamic history, societies, and cultures. Evaluates the global Islamic revival, emergence of political Islam and its interaction with the globalization of economies, societies, and cultures. Topics include Islamic modernism, nationalism, American Islam, and media representations of Islam.

Credits

5

SOCY 80M Autobiographies and Social Life

Readings from life stories of ordinary workers reveal the changes shaping European societies in age of industrialization.

Credits

5

SOCY 80X Justice and Gender

Explores gender as a social construct with deep consequences for the concept of justice in the U.S. criminal justice system. Explores law, violence, crime, punishment, and criminal justice professions with particular focus on gender differences.

Credits

5

SOCY 99F Tutorial

Directed reading and research. Petitions may be obtained from the Sociology Department Office. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Ordinarily call numbers for this course are not issued after the first week of instruction.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

SOCY 110 Violence in the Family

Examines child abuse and neglect, wife abuse, and sexual abuse in the family, using gender as a lens through which to understand domestic violence. Using a variety of sources, the course undertakes to understand the social, political, and cultural forces that contribute to abuse and to consider solutions.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring

SOCY 112 Economic Sociology

Introduction to economic sociology using field visits to key sites of production and consumption to investigate sociological ideas about the modern economy.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ben Crow

SOCY 113 Political Sociology

An intensive examination of major substantive monographs representing pluralist, elite, and class theories of the state in industrialized capitalist democracies.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Spring, Summer

SOCY 138 Symbolic Interactionism

Covers the theory of symbolic interactionism and major works in that tradition (Blumer, Goffman, and others). Also explores theoretical and applied issues in fieldwork methods, particularly participant observation and interviewing.

Credits

5

SOCY 160T Comparative Industrial Society

Considers the contradictions of state economic and social policy in the U.S. and other modern capitalist societies, with an emphasis on the post World War II period; policies of the state with regard to accumulation vs. legitimation functions; and the key role of conflicts between capital and labor.

Credits

5

SOCY 168T Newly Industrializing States in World Economy

From a global political and economic perspective, the history and consequences of new industrializing states' emergence as regional political and economic powers. Theories of state intervention and globalization of economy and society are examined in the cases of Brazil, Mexico, Korea, and others. (Formerly course 168.)

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Winter

SOCY 175 Social History of Asian Americans

Provides a general introduction to the history of Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, Koreans, and Southeast Asians, within the context of American history. Examines the diverse processes of immigration, the formation of communities, work, and family relations of Asians and Asian Americans. Looks at how social, political, and economic changes in the larger U.S. society have affected the lives of Asians in America. Offered in alternate academic years.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

American History and Institutions

Yes

SOCY 181 A Sociology of Place: The California Coast

Examines the California coast, including important social, political, cultural, and environmental aspects of this most important place. Lectures, readings, discussion, and class assignments examine the history, development, and future of the California coast.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Quarter offered

Spring

SOCY 183M Survey Research

An introduction to the methods of social research including problem formulation, research design, instrument construction, sampling design, data collection, codification, data processing, variable building, descriptive statistical analysis, and the reporting of research and analytical results.

Credits

5

SOCY 188 Religion and Social Change

Uses historical-comparative method to explore role of religion in global and local social movements. Case studies include historical analysis of the civil rights movement, Islamic movements, liberation theology, and millenarian movements. Topics vary annually. Recommended for social science and history majors.

Credits

5

Instructor

Paul Lubeck

SOCY 189 Gender and Development: Analysis and Practice

One of the greatest social transformations of our time arises from the struggle to address the almost universal (across space and time) subordination of women. For the majority of the world's population, this struggle takes place in the context of attempts to raise living standards. Examines case studies and key analytical texts, primarily relating to the Third World.

Credits

5

Instructor

Ben Crow

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

SOCY 191 Sociology Teaching Practicum

Under the supervision of the instructor, the student works with a group of students in a lower-division course, leading discussions, explaining material, reading and marking submissions, consulting individually and/or in other ways assisting in the teaching of a course. Interview and selection by professor required. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and excellent performance in core courses in the major. Enrollment restricted to senior sociology majors.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

SOCY 192 Directed Student Teaching

Teaching of a lower-division seminar under faculty supervision. (See course 42.) Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

SOCY 210B The Political Economy of the Welfare State

A critical survey of the major theoretical and empirical works on the origins, development, and impact of western welfare states. Marxist, state-centered, and electoral approaches considered; particular emphasis on the dynamics of social class, race, and gender in the growth and development of welfare states.

Credits

5

SOCY 221 International Migration

Provides a theoretical foundation for the study of international migration from a variety of perspectives relevant to sociological concerns. Examines the historical trends of migration waves and the factors which influence these movements. Students will read a variety of texts from different disciplinary and theoretical traditions including (but not limited to) neoclassical economics, world systems, transnational, post-colonial, and diasporic studies.

Credits

5

SOCY 226 Advanced Topics in Sociological Theory

In-depth reading of one or two key contemporary theorists or theoretical trends. Choice of theorists varies. Enrollment priority given to advanced graduate students.

Credits

5

SOCY 228 The State, Capitalism, and Democracy

Examines various explanations for the existence of the Modern State, starting with its rise in conjunction with the growth of industrial capitalism. Is the Modern State intrinsically a servant of economic interests or can it be responsive to a broader set of interests? Explores how various authors have attempted to answer that question, with the goal of envisioning state instutions that are truly democratic.

Credits

5

Instructor

E Du Puis

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

SOCY 243 Politics and Ideology

Explores the relationship between consciousness, ideology, and political behaviors from voting to rebellion. Special attention is given to the lived experience and the identity interests that complicate the nexus of class position and political ideology.

Credits

5

SOCY 248 Class and Cultural Studies

Examines theoretical and historical approaches to class and culture. In particular, focuses on how historical and ethnographic studies of class structure theorize different models of culture in the context of class formation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dana Takagi

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to sociology graduate students.

SOCY 250A Classic Socio Theor

Credits

5

SOCY 251 Sexualities

Provides a theoretical foundation and overview of scholarship in the sociology of sexualities. Emphasis is on significant primary sources of the 20th century which have shaped current discourse on normative and non-normative sexualities.

Credits

5

SOCY 254 Masculinities

Examines masculinity from a feminist theoretical perspective; problems and conflicts associated with modern male identities; and variety of experiences along social axes of class, race/ethnicity, sexuality, age, region, as well as gender.

Credits

5

SOCY 266 Health, Inequality, and Politics

Course focuses on sociology of health, illness, and medicine. Sociological approaches offer vital counterpoints to reductionist biomedical approaches. Medical sociology is a diverse field whose basic premise is that the nature, distribution, and meaning of health and illness are shaped by social, cultural, political, and economic factors.

Credits

5

SOCY 267 Sociology of Ethics

Explores ethics from a sociological perspective and reflects a broader critique leveled against traditional ethics by many social scientists. Reframes ethics as a set of concrete social practices that can be captured analytically, examining the social processes and judgments underlying what comes to count as an acceptable practice.

Credits

5