Upper-Division

COWL 107 Trust Rules: How to Tell the Good People from the Bad

Students learn practical tools and techniques for assessing trustworthiness, including your own, and applying these tools in a variety of situations. Integrating insights from practical experience, philosophy, and psychology, this course teaches us how to pay attention to red flags in relationships and ultimately develop a network of trustworthy people that will help us succeed in work and in our personal lives.

Credits

2

Instructor

Linda Stroh

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to college members or by permission of instructor.

COWL 110 Introduction to Mock Trial

Introduces Mock Trial, which is open to all students. Covers the basics of argumentation, cross and direct examinations, permissible evidence, witness testimony, and courtroom protocol. Special emphasis is on public speaking. Students write speeches for opening and closing arguments and create questions for witnesses. Students must read the Mock Trial handbook for examples and strategies. Each student has an opportunity for public speaking and creating a coherent legal argument.

Credits

2

Instructor

Dena Robertson

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to college members.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

COWL 111 Mock Trial Workshop

Offers opportunities to improve students’ public speaking and communication skills through weekly exercises which challenge a student’s ability to think quickly, organize information effectively and speak persuasively. Students also learn and practice courtroom procedures and legal argument styles. Each week students learn about a facet of mock trial. Students focus on different speaking skills weekly. Speakers of all skill levels are welcome and receive constructive criticism both from peers and the teachers and participate in debates within a small team.

Credits

2

Instructor

Caitlin Stinneford

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

COWL 118B Words & Music: Poetry, Musical Theater, Opera

Study of significant texts enhanced by music for performance. Topics vary annually. Course compares original texts in English translation with their adaptation to musical theater (My Fair Lady, Oklahoma, etc.) and opera (Carmen, etc.)

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

COWL 118C Musical Theater in America

Investigates the early years of musical theater by focusing on the arrival and spread of opera across the continental United States. Explores popular genres, media reception, discourses on race and art, and the way that opera transformed the American landscape. Students read important social, cultural and political histories of American opera, listen to recorded versions and watch several films. Class also features collaboration with the UCSC Opera Program to examine questions of performance.

Credits

5

General Education Code

IM

COWL 122 United Nations Contemporary Issues

Introduces the Model United Nations through discussion of contemporary issues. Students learn parliamentary procedures and U.N. protocols, as well as how to work collaboratively to research and to present position papers. Students learn resolution writing, alliance building, and persuasive speech.

Credits

2

Cross Listed Courses

CRSN 122

Instructor

Caitlin Stinneford

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-E

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

COWL 126 Trajectories of Justice: Standing Rock, Climate Change, and Trump's Potential Impeachment

Enables students to become expert on the potential impeachment of Donald Trump in the context of progressive American history, emphasizing his Neglect of Duty regarding global climate change through the lens of The Native Uprising against the Dakota Access Pipeline. (Formerly The Trajectory of Justice in America.)

Credits

5

Instructor

Daniel Sheehan

Repeatable for credit

Yes

COWL 138A The Place of Higher Education in a Democratic Society

Centers around interviews of alumni and involves a reflective term paper on a specific topic having to do with the role of higher education in a democratic society. Teaches students how to conduct interviews.

Credits

5

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): COWL 80A or COWL 80B.

General Education Code

PE-H

COWL 138B Life Development

Visits from alumni form the centerpiece of this course. In teams, students study the lives and the issues of the visitors. The aim is to reflect on the meaning of education in adult development.

Credits

2

Instructor

Faye Crosby

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): COWL 80A or COWL 80B. Enrollment is restricted to sophomore, junior, and senior Cowell College members

COWL 156M Medical Ethics and Justice in Literature and Film

Course approaches literature and literary devices in their capacity to address the patient's experience of illness, medical education and practice, and medical ethics and to understand and assess how considerations of justice impact these themes in medicine. Particular issues raised by a variety of topics are examined and discussed in the context of case examples as presented in literature and film, e.g., informed consent, the doctor-patient relation, withdrawing vs. withholding life-sustaining treatment, organ transplantation, health care reform, rationing/social justice, etc.

Credits

5

Instructor

Dawson Schultz

Repeatable for credit

Yes

COWL 158A Special Topics: Oral History

Introduction to the theory, practice, technology, and ethics of conducting oral history. Readings and expert guest speakers offer both theoretical and practical insights. Students plan and implement oral history projects in accordance with professional standards.

Credits

5

Requirements

Enrollment restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

General Education Code

PR-C

Quarter offered

Fall

COWL 161A Bards to Bloggers: Literature and Technology in Transhistorical Focus

Through study of ancient and contemporary forms (epics to e-literature), students study the connections that have tied literary reading and writing to specific technologies, including memory, the alphabet, pens, printing, radio, computing, the Internet, and handheld devices.

Credits

5

Instructor

Deanna Shemek

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior college members.

COWL 165 Fundraising Practicum

Covers the fundamental skills, ethics, and practices of crowd-sourced fundraising in the liberal arts. Students build a project portfolio that includes mission statement, donor-cultivation tools, and action reports. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor. Meet with the instructor to verify enrollment in a Giving Day campaign with liberal arts focus.

Credits

3

Cross Listed Courses

HUMN 165

Instructor

Alan Christy

COWL 168 Social Change

How do you change the world, working alone and in concert with others? To find out students spend the quarter learning about how one non-profit organization of their choosing creates change in their community. Students research an agency, focusing on who is served, how funding works and how real change is created.

Credits

2

Instructor

Caitlin Stinneford

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to college members.

Repeatable for credit

Yes

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

COWL 174 Global Leadership

Students learn about leadership styles, how leaders work with constituent groups, build cooperation, and develop implementation plans. Students learn to consider how decision making is done, and what is best practice for best working in a variety of communities and cultures. Enrollment is restricted to those participating in Virtual Global Internships.

Credits

3

Instructor

Caitlin Stinneford

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Summer

COWL 175A Imagination

Examines contemporary perspectives on the theme of imagination. Course readings include philosophical treatments of imagination, Indigenous imaginative cultural formations, and Black radical imaginations for socio-spatial liberation. Addresses the following questions: To what extent is imagination tied to our particular position, culture, and time period? What are some ways to expand our imaginations and when are these approaches limited? And how can imagination help us advance radical social change? Explores imagination as an inherently cross-cultural topic and teaches students to present, analyze, and critically discuss philosophical and sociological arguments about imagination. Students cannot receive credit for this course and PHIL 136A, PRTR 175A/PHIL 136B, or STEV 136/PHIL 136C

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

PHIL 136A

COWL 184A Leadership and Institution Building

Through lectures by senior administrators and student consensus-and-recommendation teams, students learn how leaders work with constituent groups, build cooperation, and develop implementation plans in an institution such as the University of California, specifically, UC Santa Cruz. Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates accepted in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Internship Program. Students submit applications winter quarter for the following academic year.

Credits

2

Instructor

Caitlin Stinneford, Cindy Larive

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Fall

COWL 184B Leadership and Institution Building

Through lectures by senior administrators and student consensus-and-recommendation teams, students learn how leaders work with constituent groups, build cooperation, and develop implementation plans in an institution such as the University of California, specifically, UC Santa Cruz. Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates accepted in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Internship Program. Students submit applications winter quarter for the following academic year.

Credits

2

Instructor

Caitlin Stinneford, Cindy Larive

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Winter

COWL 184C Leadership and Institution Building

Through lectures by senior administrators and student consensus-and-recommendation teams, students learn how leaders work with constituent groups, build cooperation, and develop implementation plans in an institution such as the University of California, specifically, UC Santa Cruz. Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates accepted in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Internship Program. Students submit applications winter quarter for the following academic year.

Credits

2

Instructor

Caitlin Stinneford, Cindy Larive

General Education Code

PR-S

Quarter offered

Spring

COWL 192 Directed Student Teaching

Teaching of a lower-division seminar under faculty supervision. (See COWL 42.) Upper-division standing required and a proposal supported by a faculty member willing to supervise.

Credits

5

COWL 193 Field Study

Program of study arranged between a group of students and an instructor, which may involve work with an off-campus or non-departmental agency (e.g., internship or field work). Interview only; prior arrangement with instructor. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

COWL 193F Field Study

Program of study arranged between a group of students and an instructor, which may involve work with an off-campus or non-departmental agency (e.g., internship or field work). Interview only; prior arrangement with instructor. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

COWL 194 Group Tutorial

A program of independent study arranged between a group of students and an instructor. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Instructor

Shelly Grabe

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

COWL 194F Group Tutorial

A program of independent study arranged between a group of students and an instructor. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency. Enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors.

Credits

2

Instructor

Shelly Grabe

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

COWL 195 Senior Thesis

Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

COWL 198 Independent Field Study

Provides for college-sponsored individual study programs off campus, for which faculty supervision is not in person (e.g., supervision is by correspondence.) Up to three such courses may be taken for credit in any one quarter. Approval of student's adviser, certification of adequate preparation, and approval by provost required.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

COWL 199 Tutorial

Various topics to be arranged. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

5

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

COWL 199F Tutorial

Various topics to be arranged. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.

Credits

2

Repeatable for credit

Yes

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

Cross-listed courses that are managed by another department are listed at the bottom.

Cross-listed Courses

LALS 194F Digital Investigations and Human Rights Witnessing

Explores the emerging field of digital investigations and the concept of human rights witnessing. Within the context of the impact of social media and digital technologies, course explores how ethics, power, and social inequalities affect everyday life in the digital realm, including its use to share stories of injustice and the ways access to social media and other technology is a reflection of societal inequalities. In what ways has the digital divide become more evident due to the COVID-19 pandemic? And finally, in what ways does repeatedly viewing traumatic posts online affect our well-being?

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

COWL 161E

Instructor

Sylvanna Falcon

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): LALS 100, and LALS 100A, and previous or concurrent enrollment in LALS 100B. Enrollment is restricted to junior and senior Latin American and Latino studies majors and combined majors.

General Education Code

PE-T

THEA 161Y Modern Ancient Drama

Studies 20th- and 21st-century productions and adaptations of ancient Greek and Roman drama in theater, dance, music, and film, including Stravinsky, Graham, Pasolini, and Taymor. Discusses artists' goals, the sociopolitical context, ideas of authenticity and audience response.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

COWL 161Y

Instructor

The Staff