Lower-Division

FMST 1 Feminist Studies: An Introduction

Introduces the core concepts underlying the interdisciplinary field-formation of feminist studies within multiple geopolitical contexts. Explores how feminist inquiry rethinks disciplinary assumptions and categories, and animates our engagement with culture, history, and society. Topics include: the social construction of gender; the gendered division of labor, production, and reproduction; intersections of gender, race, class, and ethnicity; and histories of sexuality.

Credits

5

Instructor

Anjali Arondekar

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Fall

FMST 10 Feminisms of/and the Global South

Explores feminist theories from domestic U.S. and global contexts in order to ask how interventions of women of color in the U.S. and of radical feminist movements in non-U.S. locations radically re-imagine feminist politics. Rather than focusing on feminist movements that represent different regions of the world, course examines feminist theory through multiple histories of colonialism, post-colonialism, and globalization.

Credits

5

Instructor

Anjali Arondekar

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring

FMST 12 Podcasting: Feminist Files

Introduces students to the basics of podcasting and guides students to become contributors to Feminist Files, a podcast that makes feminist scholarship and scholars accessible to the public. This course gives students the theoretical and practical framework to critique a variety of podcasts and engage in the podcast movement. Students learn how to conceptualize stories, research topics, interview guests, write scripts, host shows, records and edit audio. Students also build their collaboration skills by working in groups to produce segments.

Credits

5

Instructor

Kazem Halima

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least one other lower-division feminist studies course.

Quarter offered

Fall

FMST 13 California Indian History

California encompasses the nation's largest Native population and the state's policies create a complex political and legal structure. This course provides a history of early California in the 18th and 19th centuries and a review of the urban Indian experience in the 20th century. The first part sets the historical foundation and traces early California Indian history. The second part shifts to 20th-century urban Indian issues and the contemporary moment for California Indian peoples. Covers topics such as Indian labor exploitation, genocide, termination, relocation, and federal recognition.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

CRES 13

Instructor

Caitlin Keliiaa

General Education Code

ER

FMST 14 Popular Culture in South Asia

Popular culture enables people to make sense of their modern selves and their place in the world. Focusing on South Asia, this course explores the region's rich and variegated popular culture forms, including film, music, television, the painted and printed image, and sport. It also investigates how the popular articulates with nation and global conjunctures and how it constructs hierarchies of class, gender, caste, and sexuality.

Credits

5

Instructor

Madhavi Murty

General Education Code

IM

FMST 15 Gender, Sexuality, and Transnational Migration Across the Americas

Examines migration as a mode of inquiry into transnational practices across geographic locales and temporal zones. Analyzes migration in relation to the transnational formation of gender, race, and sexuality as well as processes of neocolonialism, the state, and globalization. Taught in conjunction with FMST 115.

Credits

5

General Education Code

ER

FMST 16 Media Histories--News and New Media

The news is a set of narratives that produce, maintain, repair, and transform reality. Using three events that brought together old and new media, this course traces how the interaction of new media with news has changed how we make sense of the world around us and our place in it.

Credits

5

Instructor

Madhavi Murty

General Education Code

IM

FMST 18 Black Feminist Ethnographies

Black feminist theoretical and methodological approaches to the dailiness of women's lives, which considers historical and contemporary Black feminist interventions and praxis that challenge ethnographic hegemony. Students revisit old and new debates to ponder questions of authority, genres, positionality, and citation politics.

Credits

5

Instructor

Gina Ulysse

General Education Code

ER

FMST 19 Black Feminisms: An Introduction

Focuses on key issues, core concepts and debates foundational to Black feminisms. With some consideration from the Black diaspora, students examine processes of self-making from resistance to a history of violence, practices and strategies of creative survivalism, and the ongoing struggle to liberation.

Credits

5

Instructor

Gina Ulysse

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Winter

FMST 20 Feminism and Social Justice

Examines, and critically analyzes, select post-World War II movements for social justice in the United States from feminist perspectives. Considers how those movements and their participants responded to issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality. A feminist, transnational, analytic framework is also developed to consider how those movements may have embraced, enhanced, or debilitated feminist formations in other parts of the world.

Credits

5

Instructor

Jenny Kelly

General Education Code

ER

Quarter offered

Winter

FMST 21 Religion in American Politics and Culture

Introduces dominant discourses about Christianity and Islam in the American public sphere, with particular attention paid to race, gender, sexuality, and class in thinking about religion. Visual and textual media, political commentary, and popular ethnographies are analyzed.

Credits

5

Instructor

Neda Atanasoski

General Education Code

IM

FMST 30 Feminism and Science

Explores questions of science and justice. Examines the nature of scientific practice, the culture of science, and the possibilities for the responsible practice of science. Rather than focusing on feminist critiques of science, the course examines how science and technology are changing our world and the workings of power.

Credits

5

Instructor

Neel Ahuja

General Education Code

PE-T

FMST 31 Disability Studies

Introduces students to the key critical concepts, debates, and questions of practice in the emerging field of disability studies, with a focus on feminist and critical race approaches to disability.

Credits

5

Instructor

Neel Ahuja

General Education Code

PE-H

FMST 40 Sexuality and Globalization

Examines the relationship between sexuality and the contemporary term globalization as a dense entanglement of processes that emerges from a history of U.S. empire. Sexuality cannot be separated from power struggles over the classification of bodies, territories, and questions of temporality. Examines how sexualized contact zones produce new knowledge, commerce, inequalities, possibilities, and identities.

Credits

5

General Education Code

CC

FMST 41 Trans Gender Bodies

Draws from representations of transgender/transsexual people in popular, biomedical, and political contexts. Examines the impact of transgender lives on concepts of gender, identity, and technology. Engages with biological and sexological frameworks of sex/gender, trans experience, and social movements and theories.

Credits

5

Instructor

Marcia Ochoa

Cross-listed courses that are managed by another department are listed at the bottom.

Cross-listed Courses

ANTH 110Q Queer Sexuality in Black Popular Culture

From Janet Mock to Young M.A., queerness has become hypervisible in Black popular culture--but at what cost? Using music, television, and social media as central texts, students investigate the intersections of sexuality, gender, and race in public life.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

CRES 110Q, FMST 110Q

Instructor

Savannah Shange-Binion

General Education Code

IM

Quarter offered

Spring

ANTH 148 Gender and Global Development

Uses the critical tools of feminist theory and cultural anthropology to look at how global development discourses and institutions mobilize, reinforce, and challenge systems of gender-based inequality. Topics include non-governmental organizations (NGOs), development practice, microcredit, and technocrat cultures. (Formerly Gender and Development.)

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 148

Instructor

Megan Moodie

ARTG 138 Feminist Games

Feminist games including intersectional feminist games, transfeminist games and queer feminist games, will be created by students in this course. Students will study the existing history and present of these genres of games, including game mods, personal experience games, narrative games, alternate reality, augmented reality and electronic literature. Students will work individually to create games as art and activism building on critical theories of race, gender, sexuality and algorithms.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 138

Instructor

The Staff

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): Two courses from the following: ARTG 80G, ARTG 80H, or ARTG 80I.

CRES 190A Critical Race Feminisms

Focuses on key learning outcomes of humanistic research and writing: developing a method for critical race feminist analysis, identifying objects and fields of study, formulating an appropriately narrow topic and thesis, identifying and critiquing sources, and completing well-structured written argumentation. Readings offer key theoretical models in critical race and ethnic studies, feminist studies, and queer theory.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 194S

Instructor

Neel Ahuja

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): CRES 10 and CRES 100; and satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment is restricted to critical race and ethnic studies majors.

FMST 119 Indigenous Feminisms

Explores issues central to Indigenous women's life experiences and Native feminist thought. Students consider the concerns and methodologies of Native feminisms—theories and actions that highlight how settler colonialism is a fundamentally gendered process. Engages in foundational discussions of Native feminisms, settler colonial theory, and feminist methodologies. Course content focuses on communities in settler states currently known as the U.S. and Canada. Covers topics such as reproductive justice, gendered violence, cultural reclamation, and rematriation.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

CRES 119

Instructor

Katie Keliiaa

General Education Code

ER

HAVC 245 Race and Representation

Explores how human subjects come to be visually defined and marked by race discourse. Covers diverse theoretical literatures on the topic, primarily in visual studies, but also in cultural studies, post-colonial studies, and psychoanalysis.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

HISC 245, FMST 245

Instructor

Jennifer Gonzalez

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

HISC 264 The Idea of Africa

Examines the position of Africa in cultural studies and the simultaneous processes of over- and under-representation of the continent that mark enunciations of the global and the local. Themes include defining diaspora, the West as philosophy, and Africa in the global economy.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 264

Instructor

Gina Dent

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

LALS 240 Culture and Politics of Human Rights

Examines cultural, philosophical, and political foundations for human rights and provides students with critical grounding in the major theoretical debates over conceptualizations of human rights in the Americas. Addresses the role of feminist activism and jurisprudence in the expansion of human rights since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Addresses challenges of accommodating gender rights, collective rights, and social and economic rights within international human rights framework.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 240

Instructor

Sylvanna Falcon

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

MUSC 80S Women in Music

An exploration of the sociological position of women as composers and performers in Western and non-Western musics, with a focus on both ethnographic and historical sources.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 80S

Instructor

Tanya Merchant, Madison Heyin

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Fall

OAKS 160 Cuir Américas

Advanced seminar on the politics of knowledge production and translation in queer theory across the Américas, considering the meaning and construction of queer/cuir in three languages. Students develop bibliographies of academic and activist work addressing the lives of queer/trans people throughout the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking Américas, including U.S. Latinx communities. Examines gaps in translation in this field, and students practice translation of work specific to sexual minority communities based on their language training and proficiency. Class works from the language and community expertise of students in the course inspired by bilingual poetics. Final projects produce a translation of a significant article or chapter-length work in queer theory from Spanish, Portuguese, or English to another one of these languages.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 160

Requirements

Prerequisites: SPAN 6, SPHS 6, or PORT 65B; or submission of a writing sample in either Spanish or Portuguese for instructor approval. Course requires language and composition proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese.

General Education Code

CC

Quarter offered

Spring

PHIL 147 Topics in Feminist Philosophy

Topics in feminist philosophy, which may include: the nature of feminist philosophy, feminist approaches to philosophical issues, social and political philosophy, theories of knowledge, ethics, aesthetics, and science, technology, and medicine studies. Presupposes some familiarity with philosophy or feminist scholarship.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 168

Instructor

Hande Tuna

Requirements

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or BME 80G/PHIL 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

Quarter offered

Fall

PHIL 17 Feminist Philosophy

Introduction to feminist philosophy. The topics may include (but are not limited to) oppression, normalization, discrimination, objectification, misogyny, androcentrism, patriarchy, the sex-gender distinction, sexed embodiment, gendered labor, and the relationships between sexism, racism, homophobia, and transphobia.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 17

Instructor

Emine Tuna

General Education Code

PE-H

Quarter offered

Fall, Winter, Spring

PSYC 251 Feminist Theory and Social Psychology

Course bridges feminist theory and social psychological research to explore connections between theory covered and empirical studies on various topics in social psychology. Seminar format allows students opportunity for extensive discussion.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 251

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

SOCD 204 Ethnographic Writing and Social Documentation

Graduate-level advanced seminar explores ways that seeing, hearing, and knowing are influenced by culture, power, race, and other factors. Readings emphasize how documentary subjects are constituted and known, addressing questions of epistemology, social constructivism, objectivity, and method.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 204

Instructor

Megan Moodie

Requirements

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

SOCY 268A Science and Justice: Experiments in Collaboration

Considers the practical and epistemological necessity of collaborative research in the development of new sciences and technologies that are attentive to questions of ethics and justice. Enrollment is by permission of instructor. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

BME 268A, FMST 268A, ANTH 267A

Instructor

James Doucet-Battle

SOCY 268B Science and Justice Research Seminar

Provides in-depth instruction in conducting collaborative interdisciplinary research. Students produce a final research project that explores how this training might generate research that is more responsive to the links between questions of knowledge and questions of justice. Prerequisite(s): SOCY 268A, BME 268A, FMST 268A, or ANTH 267A. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students and by permission of the instructor.

Credits

5

Cross Listed Courses

FMST 268B, BME 268B, ANTH 267B

Instructor

Julie Bettie, Rebecca London, Hiroshi Fukurai